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I can't drive a manual.

Jerry

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand.

No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure. I have no problem at all just jumping into something and learning as I go, but don't then **** on me when something brakes due to my lack of knowledge.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual and be ready to buy a new clutch. Maybe that, and YouTube, is the best way to learn.

****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?
 
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ttwtt78640

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand. No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual because evidently that's the only way I'm going to learn.
Try a cheap used birt bike. Hand operated clutch/throttle and foot opertated shifter, but the basic operations are the same. You can learn many new skills on that very inexpensive vehicle. ;)

Another option is taking a basic motorcycle safety course which is very inexpensive (I used to teach it). You will learn clutch operation and brush up on your defensive driving skills too.
 
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Helix

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i've only driven a manual car a couple times; i'm less than good at it. a manual motorcycle, though? that was completely intuitive for me, and i actually kind of prefer it.
 

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand.

No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure. I have no problem at all just jumping into something and learning as I go, but don't then **** on me when something brakes due to my lack of knowledge.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual and be ready to buy a new clutch. Maybe that, and YouTube, is the best way to learn.

****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?

Get a driving instructor.

I can't drive a manual, either - and my husband bought one. But when I brought up the fact that I can't drive it, he just shrugged it off saying, "That's no big deal, it's my car, you won't need to learn how to drive it." - However, countless times he's taken my van and left me his car, while I'm home with the kids. Thus - leaving me without transportation.

I'm so sick of it - I'm going to a driving instructor. I know it won't take long for me to learn, I just need to be taught by someone who is capable of teaching so I don't ruin the dang thing.
 

MaggieD

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand.

No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure. I have no problem at all just jumping into something and learning as I go, but don't then **** on me when something brakes due to my lack of knowledge.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual and be ready to buy a new clutch. Maybe that, and YouTube, is the best way to learn.

****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?
I learned in ten minutes. It was a car, though. Then I hadn't driven one for 15 years and drove a little Spyder convertible; like riding a bike; one never forgets. Then drove Tommy Boy's truck.

If you'd have broken it, you'd have known it, in my opinion. Much grinding of gears. And gnashing of teeth. I doubt it was you. I'd follow up with maintenance when they diagnose the problem.
 

Lord Tammerlain

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I learned in drivers Ed

Driving a Nissan Micra

The I did not drive one until I bought a very used BMW, it took a it took few days of driving to get back into it. The only real problem is on hill starts. Other then that just ensure you give it enough gas not to bog the engine and it generally is not a problem
(provided you are using the clutch
 

spud_meister

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I learnt to drive in a manual, but have driven auto's ever since.
 

Goshin

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand.

No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure. I have no problem at all just jumping into something and learning as I go, but don't then **** on me when something brakes due to my lack of knowledge.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual and be ready to buy a new clutch. Maybe that, and YouTube, is the best way to learn.

****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?


Wow, I guess it isn't common anymore. Come to think of it I haven't seen a manual transmission vehicle in a long time.

When I was growing up it was about 50/50, and my Dad made me learn on a manual. The clutch, of course, is the tricky bit... and it is just something you have to learn by feel, the hard way. There are tricks and tips sure but mostly it is just learning to feel when it is time to shift, and how to ride easy on the clutch.

One thing you don't do is keep your foot ON the clutch while driving BTW... that slight pressure lifts the clutch plate out of alignment and wears it out after a while.

One of the things back-in-the-day you had to learn about EACH new vehicle was "how sensitive is the clutch'.... it's like mastering the trigger pull on different pistols...
 

Lutherf

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Huh...I haven't owned an automatic since I got rid of my '78 Caprice in the late 80's.

Jerry, doesn't the Army still have 2 1/2 ton 6wd trucks? Those were all standard and I can't imagine not having them.
 

tacomancer

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I prefer manuals. I have also taught three people to operate them. It's not terribly hard. Goshin is right. You just have to do it enough to get the feel of it. Id teach you if I could.
 

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand.

No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure. I have no problem at all just jumping into something and learning as I go, but don't then **** on me when something brakes due to my lack of knowledge.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual and be ready to buy a new clutch. Maybe that, and YouTube, is the best way to learn.

****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?
My boyfriend had a '67 Camaro. I think we just sat in front of his house and started off. I had watched him and my parents drive enough to get the mechanics and aside from giving the clutch a bit of a toasting the first time out, it let out high, I was on my way. Slid my toe off the brake, the rest of my foot on the gas. Give it some light gas, ease the clutch til the gear grabs and then more gas.

I taught my son in a 1987 Jeep. It was brutal. Real stiff clutch that let out really high and could scrape a shin pretty good. We went to the parking lot of the local market and drove around and around. Stop/start/stop/start.

I tried teaching my daughter last year in a Kia Rio. OMG! What a weird clutch. It let out low and you have to give it a lot of gas. I was close to yacking by the time she gave up each of the three times we tried. She still can't drive a stick.

If you are learning on work trucks, chances are the clutches have some kind of a quirk. The manual trucks I've driven all had some trick to them.

It's a good skill to have. Once I got to drive one of those cars they used in the first Fast and Furious. It was amazing.

Good luck Jerry. I hope you stick with it.
 

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Drive a manual? How the hell am I supposed to steer, text and shift at the same time?
 

Jerry

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Every car or truck I've owned has been manual. I miss it after just 10 minutes in a rental with automatic transmission.

It's the lag in an auto that's the worst part. You want to change gears now but you sit there waiting for the auto to do it maybe seconds later (and then roughly if you really boot it.). They're only good for me in bumper to bumper peak hour city traffic - something I avoid like the plague anyway.

Edit: as to why I learned in a manual originally: it was harder and gave me more options. Same reason I did my heavy vehicle training/license in an old 60's coach with a crash box (no synchro mesh - you can only change gears at certain revs) even though I've never come across another since.
 
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Occam's Razor

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand.

No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure. I have no problem at all just jumping into something and learning as I go, but don't then **** on me when something brakes due to my lack of knowledge.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual and be ready to buy a new clutch. Maybe that, and YouTube, is the best way to learn.

****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?
If you're serious about mastering this for your job, here is my advice....

Find someone that has driven a truck and willing to ride with you. Rent a 20ft box truck and specify you want a manual. Then spend the day practicing.

I'd driven manual cars a lot, but when I started driving a truck, it was a different beast all together. After about two weeks, I only needed the clutch for first gear and occasionally for downshifting. It's all about the rpms. You get an ear for it.
 

Jerry

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I prefer manuals. I have also taught three people to operate them. It's not terribly hard. Goshin is right. You just have to do it enough to get the feel of it. Id teach you if I could.
My biggest thing right now is trying to get the damn thing to go into gear. That drives me mad. I get the theory and I'm trying to do it but a lot of times it's like the sifter just won't go into gear and I don't know why. I'll yell at the truck JUST ****ING DO IT!

And split gears. I get when to use them, but I keep fingering the damn switch and try to start moving in 7th when I think I'm in 1st lol. Then of course everyone notices me stall, sometimes 2 or 3 times in a row before I pull my head out of my ass and see what I did...then the comments come rolling in and I want to murder everyone lol.
 

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****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?
I learned from my stepdad. It took me a couple of hours to get the basics down, and about a week for me to feel comfortable on my own in high traffic areas. It ain't rocket science. The key is to hit the clutch sweetspot. Once you've gotten a sense of where it is, it becomes intuitive fairly quickly. It's actually a much more fun and responsive way to drive once you get used to it.

Youtube is not the best way to learn. This is one of those things that you kind of have to feel for it to make sense. You must have some friends who drive manual. Get one of them to spend a few hours giving you the rundown, and offer to pay for any resultant maintenance.
 

TheGirlNextDoor

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand.

No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure. I have no problem at all just jumping into something and learning as I go, but don't then **** on me when something brakes due to my lack of knowledge.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual and be ready to buy a new clutch. Maybe that, and YouTube, is the best way to learn.

****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?
I learned to drive a stick back when I was 19. My then husband took me out to a hill-y parking lot and yelled at me continuously to "feather the clutch". Finally I got tired of his constant yammer... I pulled over and said, "get out!". He did and I finally figured it out on my own.

I now prefer to drive manual transmissions. Too bad the kind of vehicle I have doesn't come in anything but an automatic.
 

Jerry

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You must have some friends who drive manual.
See...no...I don't, not for their personal cars...and it's a touch frustrating to me that you would assume I did. In 35 years, I've only ever known 1 person who owned a manual. I'm all about learning new things, but you shouldn't make assumptions. And YouTube was a fall-back to no one else being free to lend a hand. I'm not going to site there and act like a needy little bitch, I had to do something now because I was going right back to driving manual the next day and the only thing I knew to do was YouTube. I'm in another state, I didn't know anyone, I barley knew my foreman's name.

I may just take a manual U-Hall for a drive tomorrow if I can find one around here.
 

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See...no...I don't, not for their personal cars...and it's a touch frustrating to me that you would assume I did. In 35 years, I've only ever known 1 person who owned a manual. I'm all about learning new things, but you shouldn't make assumptions. And YouTube was a fall-back to no one else being free to lend a hand. I'm not going to site there and act like a needy little bitch, I had to do something now because I was going right back to driving manual the next day and the only thing I knew to do was YouTube. I'm in another state, I didn't know anyone, I barley knew my foreman's name.

I may just take a manual U-Hall for a drive tomorrow if I can find one around here.

Dude, I'm also 35, and I don't know anyone who doesn't know how to drive a manual. :shrug:

I understand if you're in a difficult position, but seriously it's not that hard. It's just a matter of practice. I'm sure you'll pick it up if you can find some way to get some practice time.
 
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lizzie

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I love driving a stick-shift, but they are so difficult to find anymore. When I was a teenager, my dad tried to teach me how to drive a manual in an OLD Dodge Dart, and it was a disaster. When I was around 18, I bought a Toyota Corolla that had a manual transmission, and it was a piece of cake to learn. I loved it.
 

joko104

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It's not something most people learn anymore.

In my 35 years I never ever had to once operate anything with a manual transmission. Everything in the Army is automatic, even the tractor trucks. Not one employer ever had a manual company vehicle. Everything I've ever owned has been automatic. In fact I've turned down a few good deals on personal cars because I didn't know how to drive a manual. Until recently I only knew one person in my whole life who even owned a manual truck. I asked him to teach me and he wanted the cost for a new clutch up-front.

So I start a new job last month...all but one of their company trucks are manual. I told my foreman up-front that I was willing to learn but didn't know how to drive a manual. He looked at me and said "you were born on Earth, right?". I get a lot of comments like that, but I laugh it off with them instead of getting frustrated and but-hurt in the hopes that someone would lend a hand.

No one wanted to help me learn, not because they're jerks but because we're busy.

Most of the trucks that I use are kept out on the right-of-way, so I rarely need to go above 2nd gear. I'm thinking "this is good practice for a newbie to manuals like me". And it was, imo. I got past a lot of newbie habits real quick, like riding the clutch or releasing the service brake to soon while facing up-hill.

Then the inevitable happened: I had to drive my truck on a freeway 40 miles back to the yard. There was no one else available who could drive it for me, or drive with me. I really don't understand what I did during those 40 miles that now caused the truck to refuse to go into 1st gear, and the clutch grinds constantly in and out of gear. Most of he crew thinks this one asshole broke it and blamed it on me, but it doesn't matter since the Super also thinks it's my fault and now I'm not allowed to operate anything.

I guess what I'm frustrated about is I told my foreman up front that I didn't know how to drive a manual and he put me on a manual anyway with no help. In a way I feel I was set up for failure. I have no problem at all just jumping into something and learning as I go, but don't then **** on me when something brakes due to my lack of knowledge.

When I trade in my car I may just buy a manual and be ready to buy a new clutch. Maybe that, and YouTube, is the best way to learn.

****
How did you learn to drive a manual? Do they even teach that in Driver's Training anymore?
It's the easiest thing in the world. Push in the clutch, start it, put it in 1st gear, rev it up quite a bit and slowly let out the clutch. Do that 10 times and you got it. From there it's just shifting thru the numbers on the shifter using the same procedure. That's all there is to it. Just do it. No one can teach you. You learn by doing it.
 

joko104

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Wow, I guess it isn't common anymore. Come to think of it I haven't seen a manual transmission vehicle in a long time.

When I was growing up it was about 50/50, and my Dad made me learn on a manual. The clutch, of course, is the tricky bit... and it is just something you have to learn by feel, the hard way. There are tricks and tips sure but mostly it is just learning to feel when it is time to shift, and how to ride easy on the clutch.

One thing you don't do is keep your foot ON the clutch while driving BTW... that slight pressure lifts the clutch plate out of alignment and wears it out after a while.

One of the things back-in-the-day you had to learn about EACH new vehicle was "how sensitive is the clutch'.... it's like mastering the trigger pull on different pistols...
Riding the clutch also can wear out the throwout bearing.
 
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