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Laptop Error On Start Up

Old 'N Chill

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Recently I started getting a blue screen upon start up, the error is 90B, cooling fan issue. The laptop is around 2 years old, very lightly used, maybe an hour a day, and kept very clean, I still use the cloth cover over the keyboard before closing it after use.

It's an HP 17.3 inch screen laptop. I vacuumed the vents (no dust was evident), then followed with canned air. I've been looking at HP support sites, and can't find what to do. I can hit the Enter key when this happens and still use the computer, although they don't recommend that. I don't know much about computers at all, but I would like an easy fix, or I'll probably take the chance to just keep using it this way.

I did go into Device Manager and try to update driver, the result after the automatic search was that the driver I have is the one that is best recommended for device, so no update. I don't have anybody around who knows computers to help when I have a problem, so I do hesitate to make any changes on my computers that may cause an issue. I tried to use the chat feature on HP support, but I didn't get a human and just got stuck in a loop, answering the same questions over and over, and being presented with list choices of what my problem is, none fit the cooling fan error.

Anyone ever have this issue on such a new computer that really had no dust issues involved? I'm shy about doing anything with the computer that I don't understand, but hoping for an easy and safe fix. If I'm not comfortable making some changes, I may just let it ride and keep my fingers crossed.
 

calamity

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Recently I started getting a blue screen upon start up, the error is 90B, cooling fan issue. The laptop is around 2 years old, very lightly used, maybe an hour a day, and kept very clean, I still use the cloth cover over the keyboard before closing it after use.

It's an HP 17.3 inch screen laptop. I vacuumed the vents (no dust was evident), then followed with canned air. I've been looking at HP support sites, and can't find what to do. I can hit the Enter key when this happens and still use the computer, although they don't recommend that. I don't know much about computers at all, but I would like an easy fix, or I'll probably take the chance to just keep using it this way.

I did go into Device Manager and try to update driver, the result after the automatic search was that the driver I have is the one that is best recommended for device, so no update. I don't have anybody around who knows computers to help when I have a problem, so I do hesitate to make any changes on my computers that may cause an issue. I tried to use the chat feature on HP support, but I didn't get a human and just got stuck in a loop, answering the same questions over and over, and being presented with list choices of what my problem is, none fit the cooling fan error.

Anyone ever have this issue on such a new computer that really had no dust issues involved? I'm shy about doing anything with the computer that I don't understand, but hoping for an easy and safe fix. If I'm not comfortable making some changes, I may just let it ride and keep my fingers crossed.
You have a fan issue. Either the fan is defective or the guts of your machine is generating too much heat and the fan cannot keep up. Since it happens at start up, my guess is your fan isn't operating correctly.

Here's some info.
 

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Slyfox696

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Recently I started getting a blue screen upon start up, the error is 90B, cooling fan issue. The laptop is around 2 years old, very lightly used, maybe an hour a day, and kept very clean, I still use the cloth cover over the keyboard before closing it after use.

It's an HP 17.3 inch screen laptop. I vacuumed the vents (no dust was evident), then followed with canned air. I've been looking at HP support sites, and can't find what to do. I can hit the Enter key when this happens and still use the computer, although they don't recommend that. I don't know much about computers at all, but I would like an easy fix, or I'll probably take the chance to just keep using it this way.

I did go into Device Manager and try to update driver, the result after the automatic search was that the driver I have is the one that is best recommended for device, so no update. I don't have anybody around who knows computers to help when I have a problem, so I do hesitate to make any changes on my computers that may cause an issue. I tried to use the chat feature on HP support, but I didn't get a human and just got stuck in a loop, answering the same questions over and over, and being presented with list choices of what my problem is, none fit the cooling fan error.

Anyone ever have this issue on such a new computer that really had no dust issues involved? I'm shy about doing anything with the computer that I don't understand, but hoping for an easy and safe fix. If I'm not comfortable making some changes, I may just let it ride and keep my fingers crossed.
Short answer first: Take it to a computer repair shop and let them fix it.

My guess is that the fan which helps cool the CPU is either not working or is not working well. It COULD be other things (as listed in the link provided by calamity), but it is likely your CPU cooling system. You do NOT want to cross your fingers and hope for the best. At best, your laptop may randomly shut down, causing you to lose work. At worst, your computer could suffer enough damage you would want/need to buy a new one.

Long answer: At the bottom of your laptop will be the model of the laptop (for example, the model of laptops we currently use at work are Probook X360 11 G5 EE). If you google the model of your HP laptop, along with the words "maintenance and service guide", you should be able to find on HP's website the repair manual. Once you find the manual, you can follow the instructions to take your laptop apart. Depending on the laptop, this could be any number of steps, though it'll most likely require removing the screws from the back and there's a good chance it will require removing the keyboard (which can be a real PITA to hook back up). If you want to provide the entire model number of your HP laptop, I could even make sure you get the correct manual and direct you to the page you need.

What will likely happen when you open the laptop is, unless you've kept in a dusty/dirty shop, the inside of the laptop will be relatively clean. You could blow in the direction of the fan and see if you get dust, but you probably won't get enough to have caused a problem. At that point, you will likely need to replace the cooling system on the laptop. This is not OVERLY hard, but if you're shy about doing it, I would take it to a repair shop. That way they would make sure you get the right replacement part and install it correctly. And, as someone who has taken many computers and many laptops apart for various reasons at work, while it may be interesting the first time, I can promise you it's not interesting enough to spend hours working on.


No, I never have that problem on any of my 3 laptops.


Here is an easy fix.

Yes, because Apple products never have hardware issues... :rolleyes:
 
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Mycroft

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Recently I started getting a blue screen upon start up, the error is 90B, cooling fan issue. The laptop is around 2 years old, very lightly used, maybe an hour a day, and kept very clean, I still use the cloth cover over the keyboard before closing it after use.

It's an HP 17.3 inch screen laptop. I vacuumed the vents (no dust was evident), then followed with canned air. I've been looking at HP support sites, and can't find what to do. I can hit the Enter key when this happens and still use the computer, although they don't recommend that. I don't know much about computers at all, but I would like an easy fix, or I'll probably take the chance to just keep using it this way.

I did go into Device Manager and try to update driver, the result after the automatic search was that the driver I have is the one that is best recommended for device, so no update. I don't have anybody around who knows computers to help when I have a problem, so I do hesitate to make any changes on my computers that may cause an issue. I tried to use the chat feature on HP support, but I didn't get a human and just got stuck in a loop, answering the same questions over and over, and being presented with list choices of what my problem is, none fit the cooling fan error.

Anyone ever have this issue on such a new computer that really had no dust issues involved? I'm shy about doing anything with the computer that I don't understand, but hoping for an easy and safe fix. If I'm not comfortable making some changes, I may just let it ride and keep my fingers crossed.
What Slyfox696 said...

My son had a cooling problem with his laptop, except besides overheating, it made noises, too. I took it apart and identified which of the two fans made the noise, he ordered a new fan and I put it in. Fixed the problem...for about a month. Then the new fan started making noises and the laptop started overheating again.

My son said **** it...and bought a new laptop.
 

Court Jester

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I was joking of course.

Replacing the fans is easy to do. There many youtube videos on how to do it. Good luck!
 

Checkerboard Strangler

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Yes, because Apple products never have hardware issues... :rolleyes:
They don't!
By the time they would, Apple convinces the majority of buyers to just get a new one, and then they start breaking legacy software so that it doesn't work on older models to catch the rest of the holdouts, or they sunset the legacy stuff altogether.
That's what they do.
And hey, Apple makes EXCELLENT HARDWARE, no question about it.
But I know about 250 film editors, SFX guys, and colorists who still carry grudges about what Apple has done to them.
One friend invested almost 150-200 thousand dollars of his own money in Apple Color gear for his SFX conforming shop.
Two years later Apple sunsetted Apple Color and integrated it into a version of Final Cut Pro, which was great for straight editors but it rendered all his outboard Apple Color hardware worthless the moment the next OS came out because the next OS wasn't compatible with all his Apple Color hardware, and he had a humming little operation, which suffered huge setbacks.

But it still boils down to your personality type more than anything else, so Old and Chill, who confesses to not being real brave when it comes to tackling techie-geeky stuff, may wind up LOVING Apple machines.

Now, in response to the OP, I wish I had better advice other than "don't use laptops unless you're somewhere outside home and absolutely have to."

I/we do HAVE a couple of laptops here, and the wife absolutely adores her Microsoft Surface, which is in addition the other two, one an older MacBook and the other an old HP.
But really, only her Surface gets regular use. The other two only get fired up on the road.

I confess that I am more a fan of the Big Iron, desktop machines.
I hate using underpowered laptops.
I just don't understand their appeal beyond convenience and basic use profiles.
I would never attempt to edit film on one, Gawd please spare me.

And by the way, I personally do NOT hold a grudge against Apple for doing what they do, and how they do it, and the reason is painfully simple:

Those "250 film editors, SFX guys, and colorists who still carry grudges?"
They hate hearing this but the truth is, they are a very very VERY TINY part of the Apple user base.
They just seem to THINK that they are the cornerstone of it but it's simply not the case and Apple should not be under ANY obligation to force their entire ecosystem to cater to a group which MIGHT be ten percent of their base at the very most.

I don't mean to say that there's only 250 of them.
I'm saying that the entire film community of Apple users is almost microscopic compared to the larger Apple user base altogether.
They are overly convinced of their own importance! 😂

And don't call them out on it, tends to make them quite hostile! 🤣
 

Slyfox696

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They don't!
By the time they would, Apple convinces the majority of buyers to just get a new one, and then they start breaking legacy software so that it doesn't work on older models to catch the rest of the holdouts, or they sunset the legacy stuff altogether.
That's what they do.
Apple was literally fined and admitted to deliberately slowing down their own hardware. :) Though you are definitely right about why they did it.

Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-51413724
 

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Apple was literally fined and admitted to deliberately slowing down their own hardware. :) Though you are definitely right about why they did it.

Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-51413724
If you're old enough to remember when the phone system largely consisted of "Ma Bell" then the Apple business model should look very familiar. In the days of "The Telephone Company" you weren't allowed to modify equipment, or connect anything else to the network, or modify the infrastructure in any way whatsoever. Ma Bell even owned the telephone instruments.
Apple does not go that far but they do operate a walled garden and outside tweaking is looked down upon because if it is not Apple approved, it ain't going inside a Mac, and no one else MAKES Macs except for Apple and they've successfully sued plenty of outfits that tried making their own Macs. They can't catch them all but they caught enough of them.

You know the old Leon Russell saying:
"Stray dogs that live on the highway walk on three legs....cause they learn too slow to get the message....give up and win is all I have to say....we haven't really won....til all the fightin's done....and there are no more ballads for a soldier"

But Apple gets credit because one of the reasons "It just WORKS" is because Apple guarantees that everything is specced strictly to Apple BY Apple and the Apple quality goes in the box before the Apple logo goes on the outside.
And that's how Ma Bell guaranteed that if you picked up the handset, you got a dial tone and your call was guaranteed to go through.

In the early days of non-Apple film editing platforms, of which there were many, other manufacturers also followed the Apple model too. If you wanted a Pinnacle Systems setup you had to buy ALL your hardware FROM or THROUGH a Pinnacle dealer and it was guaranteed to perform to Pinnacle specs. Same with AVID, there were no third party AVID systems back in the old days. The software wouldn't even RUN on anything that wasn't AVID built and specced top to bottom.

There was no such thing as a third party hardware profile for professional post production gear.
The very last company to stick to this model was Sony with their Xpri system, of which Oprah and Harpo Studios was a huge fan in the old days.
 

Old 'N Chill

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Thanks to everyone for your advice. :) @calamity, thanks for the link, I was on that page, but didn't explore everything there. They mentioned HP Cool Sense and Command Center (thermal profile), I'll check the laptop and see if I have those. I usually use my desktop, which I'm on right now, also an HP, but older than the laptop, haven't had any issues with it (yet). ;)
 

grip

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Thanks to everyone for your advice. :) @calamity, thanks for the link, I was on that page, but didn't explore everything there. They mentioned HP Cool Sense and Command Center (thermal profile), I'll check the laptop and see if I have those. I usually use my desktop, which I'm on right now, also an HP, but older than the laptop, haven't had any issues with it (yet). ;)
I don't know if this would help a hardware issue but you could run the sfc /scannow command. It will scan all protected system files, and replace corrupted files with a cached copy that is located in a compressed folder at %WinDir%\System32\dllcache. Below is a simple tutorial.

 

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+1 for slyfox696's advice. It's worth taking it to a repair shop for cooling issues. Insufficient cooling could ruin the computer.
 
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