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Sheriffs Want Access to Prescription Database

Cold Highway

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The state sheriff's association proposed the idea Tuesday to a legislative health care committee, The News & Observer of Raleigh reported. The sheriffs said they want access to state computer records identifying anyone with prescriptions for powerful painkillers and other controlled substances.
Oh yea, nothing fascist about this. :roll:

Sheriffs Want Access to Prescription Database - BlackListed News
 

MaggieD

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The way to enforce this is through doctors who prescribe them -- not the patients who take them. Sheriffs are capable of deciding who uses too much pain killer? Give me a break. Pharmacies already have to track controlled substance prescriptions by doctor. Let them have access to that and save countless doc-made-drug-addicts by putting those creeps out of business.
 

Councilman

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This is another slippery slope that needs to be nipped in the bud. Since the passage of the Patriots Acts one and two and some other laws on the books we face The Big Brother World we were warned about by George Orwell in 1984.

Those who stand for nothing fall for anything
 

Coronado

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Tell ya what, I'll let you snoop through my medical records if you let me snoop through the medical records of all the employees of the Sheriff's Department. What's good for the goose, right?
 

digsbe

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With a warrant I think they should be able to do this. Trust me, working in a pharmacy there are tons of drug addicts and narcotics abusers. The police should have access to their info if they are to be tried or suspected. However, I only support this with a judge issued warrant.
 

Caine

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With a warrant I think they should be able to do this. Trust me, working in a pharmacy there are tons of drug addicts and narcotics abusers. The police should have access to their info if they are to be tried or suspected. However, I only support this with a judge issued warrant.
I don't blame them......

Apparently the doctors and phramacies are supposed to be the ones who keep track of drug dependent doc shoppers?
You know... the people who make the profit off of their visit to get their bull**** prescription from the doc... and then have it filled at the pharmacy.....

Is it no wonder that only 20/10% of the doctors/pharmacies have bothered to sign up??

Non-Emergency Medicine is nothing more than being a legal professional drug dealer....Why do you think you can't walk into a doctor's office without seeing at least 10+ pharmaceutical company advertisements...


So.. I can see why the Sheriff's would want access... someone has to actually do something about this crap... it certainly isn't going to be the folks who are making the profits off of it. So why not the guys who have to play clean-up from the **** that it causes?
 

Harry Guerrilla

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I don't blame them......

Apparently the doctors and phramacies are supposed to be the ones who keep track of drug dependent doc shoppers?
You know... the people who make the profit off of their visit to get their bull**** prescription from the doc... and then have it filled at the pharmacy.....

Is it no wonder that only 20/10% of the doctors/pharmacies have bothered to sign up??

Non-Emergency Medicine is nothing more than being a legal professional drug dealer....Why do you think you can't walk into a doctor's office without seeing at least 10+ pharmaceutical company advertisements...


So.. I can see why the Sheriff's would want access... someone has to actually do something about this crap... it certainly isn't going to be the folks who are making the profits off of it. So why not the guys who have to play clean-up from the **** that it causes?
I see your point but you wouldn't have to deal with it, if it were legal over the counter.
 

Caine

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I see your point but you wouldn't have to deal with it, if it were legal over the counter.
Ummmm... Yes.. Actually, Law Enforcement would have to deal with it.

Overdose calls... thats us.
Assault with a Deadly Weapon while fighting over the pills or because of the pills.... thats us.
Child Abuse/Neglect because parents are too ****ing stoned out of their worthless minds to take care of the children..... that us.
Fatal Traffic Crash because someone was high on pills..... that us.
Teenagers running away from home because their parents are emotionally missing from abusing narcotic pills....... thats us.

Prescription Pill Abuse causes more problems then just the violation of controlled substance laws.

And while these things I listed already happen, I have a good feeling that the call volume for this type of **** would be significantly higher if they were avaliable over the counter.
 

Harry Guerrilla

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Ummmm... Yes.. Actually, Law Enforcement would have to deal with it.

Overdose calls... thats us.
Assault with a Deadly Weapon while fighting over the pills or because of the pills.... thats us.
Child Abuse/Neglect because parents are too ****ing stoned out of their worthless minds to take care of the children..... that us.
Fatal Traffic Crash because someone was high on pills..... that us.
Teenagers running away from home because their parents are emotionally missing from abusing narcotic pills....... thats us.

Prescription Pill Abuse causes more problems then just the violation of controlled substance laws.

And while these things I listed already happen, I have a good feeling that the call volume for this type of **** would be significantly higher if they were avaliable over the counter.
I don't believe that it would be more likely, some things may be less likely.
The fighting over pills, in the event that they become cheaper as OTC medicines.

I know pretty well how people shop doctors for these things, my family is full of these type of people.
It's despicable but it's also a waste on doctors resources to see people, when instead they can buy it without all the bs.
 

MaggieD

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I don't blame them......

Apparently the doctors and phramacies are supposed to be the ones who keep track of drug dependent doc shoppers?
You know... the people who make the profit off of their visit to get their bull**** prescription from the doc... and then have it filled at the pharmacy.....

Is it no wonder that only 20/10% of the doctors/pharmacies have bothered to sign up??

Non-Emergency Medicine is nothing more than being a legal professional drug dealer....Why do you think you can't walk into a doctor's office without seeing at least 10+ pharmaceutical company advertisements...


So.. I can see why the Sheriff's would want access... someone has to actually do something about this crap... it certainly isn't going to be the folks who are making the profits off of it. So why not the guys who have to play clean-up from the **** that it causes?
Why do we keep making the same mistake? Going after the small-fry-user? I think it's wrong to violate a person's right to privacy so that the sheriff's office can correlate and count how many pills someone is using. They're hooked. Their drug dealer is their doctor(s). He gets $125 a script. The office visit. I'm all for law enforcement having access to the doctor database that shows how many narcotics a doctor is prescribing out of his office. But I don't think law enforcement should be knockin' on somebody's door and asking why they take so many pills.
 

Caine

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Why do we keep making the same mistake? Going after the small-fry-user? I think it's wrong to violate a person's right to privacy so that the sheriff's office can correlate and count how many pills someone is using. They're hooked. Their drug dealer is their doctor(s). He gets $125 a script. The office visit. I'm all for law enforcement having access to the doctor database that shows how many narcotics a doctor is prescribing out of his office. But I don't think law enforcement should be knockin' on somebody's door and asking why they take so many pills.
Thats the thing........
One might think a doc shopper is just a really bad junkie.... but they aren't......
They are the front man... the doctor/pharmacy is the middle man.

Individual doc shops to fill a bunch of prescriptions.
Then he sells the individual pills on the street for 10, 20, 30 bucks a pill.........

That isn't the small fry user you were talking about is it?
 

MaggieD

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Thats the thing........
One might think a doc shopper is just a really bad junkie.... but they aren't......
They are the front man... the doctor/pharmacy is the middle man.

Individual doc shops to fill a bunch of prescriptions.
Then he sells the individual pills on the street for 10, 20, 30 bucks a pill.........

That isn't the small fry user you were talking about is it?
I get it nowww. Yeah, that makes sense. Skuze me while I shift my paradigm. ;-)
 

d0gbreath

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HIPAA just passed a ruling last July that states that you do not have to give your prescription drug information to your employer. I'm sure they'll be all over this in a matter of time.

The privacy is to insure that your data doesn't get sold to insurance companies, or can be looked up by prospective employers.

Why does law enforcement always have to be at the expense of the law abiding citizens?
 

Aunt Spiker

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More people in their counties die of accidental overdoses than from homicides, the sheriffs said.
That definitely doesn't make it right.

I've never seen an addiction as a reason for the police to be involved - and addiction is psychological, physical, emotional . . . all things that the police *don't* have experience in.

What can the police do? Throw you in jail - that's all.
What is that going to *fix* though? We're talking about parents, teachers - people who have others that depend on them to make it through their day. If wrong and ineffective action is taken against them we're just screwing people over.

Haven't we learned that there's more to these types of issues than "get them off the streets?" 3 strikes your out isn't working - nor are other blunt approaches to the problem.

But it's proven that when someone takes the time to learn, understand and be supportive the person struggling with their problems sees more success in getting past it.
 
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Caine

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HIPAA just passed a ruling last July that states that you do not have to give your prescription drug information to your employer. I'm sure they'll be all over this in a matter of time.

The privacy is to insure that your data doesn't get sold to insurance companies, or can be looked up by prospective employers.

Why does law enforcement always have to be at the expense of the law abiding citizens?
I'll ask like I often do in these scenarios.

What is it costing you?
 

Caine

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That definitely doesn't make it right.

I've never seen an addiction as a reason for the police to be involved - and addiction is psychological, physical, emotional . . . all things that the police *don't* have experience in.

What can the police do? Throw you in jail - that's all.
What is that going to *fix* though? We're talking about parents, teachers - people who have others that depend on them to make it through their day. If wrong and ineffective action is taken against them we're just screwing people over.

Haven't we learned that there's more to these types of issues than "get them off the streets?" 3 strikes your out isn't working - nor are other blunt approaches to the problem.

But it's proven that when someone takes the time to learn, understand and be supportive the person struggling with their problems sees more success in getting past it.
You've proven just how little you know about what law enforcement does.........

It isn't our job to just throw people in jail.

We are problem solvers who fill a great number of roles other than just tossing people in jail.
 

liblady

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The way to enforce this is through doctors who prescribe them -- not the patients who take them. Sheriffs are capable of deciding who uses too much pain killer? Give me a break. Pharmacies already have to track controlled substance prescriptions by doctor. Let them have access to that and save countless doc-made-drug-addicts by putting those creeps out of business.
nope. i believe they can get access with a warrant, however, which is the way it should be.
 

MaggieD

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nope. i believe they can get access with a warrant, however, which is the way it should be.
I've actually changed my opinion on this after reading Caine's post at #12.
 

Orion

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I don't think doctors should be monitored either. If a doctor's script writing is monitored then he will be less likely to prescribe certain drugs, in order to remain off the radar. In the end that only hurts the patient. It wouldn't happen anyway because that would put negative pressure on drug sales, and the pharmaceutical industry would step in to make sure it gets stopped. That's why the Sherrifs propose monitoring individual users, instead of examining the entire drug chain from manufacturing to dispensing; it is the patient/user who has the least amount of power to do anything about it so they will suffer the privacy invasion first.

IMO the entire pharmaceutical drug system needs to be re-evaluated from the ground up. Abuse of the narcotics is just a symptom of a bigger problem. There are few genuine cases where someone needs to be on high level pain killers, sleep aids, etc. for the long-term, and there are many, many complementary therapies available to deal with pain. The fact that I can visit my MD today and make up some story about pain or trouble sleeping and get a fairly dangerous narcotic within minutes is rather disturbing. People who come in with those complaints should receive testing and evaluation.

Years ago I was in a car accident and in the year that followed I had severe back pain. My family doctor pushed pain killers immediately, saying it was a soft tissue injury. I had to push him to order x-rays. He did, and nothing came back as being broken, according to him. I later went to another MD for a second opinion -- again, pain killers were pushed. It took three years and some digging before I figured out that maybe something called a chiropractor could help me. Turns out my spine was severely misaligned in one place, and he fixed the problem with a few weeks of manual manipulation.

I am frustrated with MDs. They are increasingly being trained to not actively seek solutions, but to be salespeople for narcotics. Where is the real healing in that?
 

Caine

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I don't think doctors should be monitored either. If a doctor's script writing is monitored then he will be less likely to prescribe certain drugs, in order to remain off the radar. In the end that only hurts the patient. It wouldn't happen anyway because that would put negative pressure on drug sales, and the pharmaceutical industry would step in to make sure it gets stopped. That's why the Sherrifs propose monitoring individual users, instead of examining the entire drug chain from manufacturing to dispensing; it is the patient/user who has the least amount of power to do anything about it so they will suffer the privacy invasion first.

IMO the entire pharmaceutical drug system needs to be re-evaluated from the ground up. Abuse of the narcotics is just a symptom of a bigger problem. There are few genuine cases where someone needs to be on high level pain killers, sleep aids, etc. for the long-term, and there are many, many complementary therapies available to deal with pain. The fact that I can visit my MD today and make up some story about pain or trouble sleeping and get a fairly dangerous narcotic within minutes is rather disturbing. People who come in with those complaints should receive testing and evaluation.

Years ago I was in a car accident and in the year that followed I had severe back pain. My family doctor pushed pain killers immediately, saying it was a soft tissue injury. I had to push him to order x-rays. He did, and nothing came back as being broken, according to him. I later went to another MD for a second opinion -- again, pain killers were pushed. It took three years and some digging before I figured out that maybe something called a chiropractor could help me. Turns out my spine was severely misaligned in one place, and he fixed the problem with a few weeks of manual manipulation.

I am frustrated with MDs. They are increasingly being trained to not actively seek solutions, but to be salespeople for narcotics. Where is the real healing in that?
I don't think I can thank you enough for this post.....

When I got my vascectomy last year, I was given a script for a bottle of Hydrocodone or something like that with like 40 pills in it, and two refills? Seriously? The original bottle is still sitting in my cabinet with only about 3 missing. I took them for the first day and then took regular OTC pain killers the next two days... as needed (maybe one/two dosages per day).

I don't even want to mention the stockpile I was given last september when I had my gallbladder taken out.....I got three different narcotic pain relievers, all with refills. They gave me these Vicodin where it recommended taking two at once..... Ugh.... I still have all that **** up there too.
 

Aunt Spiker

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I don't think I can thank you enough for this post.....

When I got my vascectomy last year, I was given a script for a bottle of Hydrocodone or something like that with like 40 pills in it, and two refills? Seriously? The original bottle is still sitting in my cabinet with only about 3 missing. I took them for the first day and then took regular OTC pain killers the next two days... as needed (maybe one/two dosages per day).

I don't even want to mention the stockpile I was given last september when I had my gallbladder taken out.....I got three different narcotic pain relievers, all with refills. They gave me these Vicodin where it recommended taking two at once..... Ugh.... I still have all that **** up there too.
My husband's in that pot - he had bottles and bottles of pills - a bunch of them - that he's been prescribed and never actually used.

Recently my state had a pill-drop - monitored collection boxes were set up and the # of pills that people dropped off to be collected and properly discarded was ridiculous.

Made me wonder just how much money was tossed away - insurance and out of pocket alike, if we don't use that many then we're very *very* wasteful of something that so many people could only dream of affording.
 

Caine

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My husband's in that pot - he had bottles and bottles of pills - a bunch of them - that he's been prescribed and never actually used.

Recently my state had a pill-drop - monitored collection boxes were set up and the # of pills that people dropped off to be collected and properly discarded was ridiculous.

Made me wonder just how much money was tossed away - insurance and out of pocket alike, if we don't use that many then we're very *very* wasteful of something that so many people could only dream of affording.
But hey.... the pharmaceutical companies got theirs..... thats the important part.
....

Right?

:roll:
 
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