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Let's Talk About Violence: What is going on?

blackjack50

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This is a discussion of VIOLENCE. NOT gun control. This about violence in general and what the problem is here in America vs other nations that have similar socioeconomics. What is done differently?

I have been pondering this question and with the most recent shooting I truly feel we have a plethora of evidence to discuss this topic at length, and we don't have to continually blame "guns" for general violence problems. Any time an incident of terror or a serial killer or a even down to domestic violence or rape...there is often a very real common trait:

Borderline Personality Disorder - Personality Disorders

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084627.htm

The terrorist with antisocial personality disorder

Personality disorders--Axis II gets short shrift

Personality disorders. It is technically a mental illness. But it isn't the same. It is completely different. It isn't like Down syndrome. These people appear normal, they feel normal, but they suffer from something like deep rage and antipathy. They may not even see humans as anything more than speed bumps between them and their goals.

So with all this evidence: does it make sense that we should try and treat these? Our insurance industry here in America is a major handicap in dealing with mental health. As the final article states: they have put up major roadblocks because of difficulty of treatment. It is a numerical bottom line. A liability concern. They are covering their own ass. And their profit.

So if you wonder why people may seem more well adjusted in another nation? Start to wonder about that. What kind of health care do you get if you have a deep rage control issue due to a past experience? How hard is it for you to get psychotherapy covered? Can you go talk to a psychologist or a psychiatrist? Is that even financially viable?

Is it possible for us to have a good discussion on this without being distracted by the buzz words "Islamic terrorist" or "gun control?" What do you think? Should we be looking at the deeper concern on violence? Are we even trying? Or do you think we are clouded by the media and politicians and the buzz words and this is just pissing in the wind?
 

blackjack50

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Pissing in the wind I guess.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

faithful_servant

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This is a discussion of VIOLENCE. NOT gun control. This about violence in general and what the problem is here in America vs other nations that have similar socioeconomics. What is done differently?

I have been pondering this question and with the most recent shooting I truly feel we have a plethora of evidence to discuss this topic at length, and we don't have to continually blame "guns" for general violence problems. Any time an incident of terror or a serial killer or a even down to domestic violence or rape...there is often a very real common trait:

Borderline Personality Disorder - Personality Disorders

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084627.htm

The terrorist with antisocial personality disorder

Personality disorders--Axis II gets short shrift

Personality disorders. It is technically a mental illness. But it isn't the same. It is completely different. It isn't like Down syndrome. These people appear normal, they feel normal, but they suffer from something like deep rage and antipathy. They may not even see humans as anything more than speed bumps between them and their goals.

So with all this evidence: does it make sense that we should try and treat these? Our insurance industry here in America is a major handicap in dealing with mental health. As the final article states: they have put up major roadblocks because of difficulty of treatment. It is a numerical bottom line. A liability concern. They are covering their own ass. And their profit.

So if you wonder why people may seem more well adjusted in another nation? Start to wonder about that. What kind of health care do you get if you have a deep rage control issue due to a past experience? How hard is it for you to get psychotherapy covered? Can you go talk to a psychologist or a psychiatrist? Is that even financially viable?

Is it possible for us to have a good discussion on this without being distracted by the buzz words "Islamic terrorist" or "gun control?" What do you think? Should we be looking at the deeper concern on violence? Are we even trying? Or do you think we are clouded by the media and politicians and the buzz words and this is just pissing in the wind?

Keep in mind that a lot of what is being seen as an increase in violence is merely an increase in the reporting and tracking of violence. In the past, there wasn't a consistent approach to tracking acts of violence, whereas today we have some pretty decent methods for doing so. We also are seeing a rash of over-reporting of acts of violence. Between the two we being given the perception vastly increased violence, when the truth is it's most likely a minor increase.
 

DamnYankee

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This about violence in general and what the problem is here in America vs other nations that have similar socioeconomics. What is done differently?

I believe its a combination of factors. Most notably is the destruction of the family at the hands of liberalism. The state has in essence replaced fathers. Not to mention there is a systematic attack by the left on fatherhood.
 

katzgar

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I believe its a combination of factors. Most notably is the destruction of the family at the hands of liberalism. The state has in essence replaced fathers. Not to mention there is a systematic attack by the left on fatherhood.


what a pile of crap
 

DamnYankee

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what a pile of crap

Perhaps the second notable cause would be the left has cheapened life by unhindered abortions that have killed millions of Americans over the years.
 

blaxshep

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Nothing has changed this is normal human behavior.
 

DamnYankee

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And then, of course, the left attacks Americans by leading them to believe they are too stupid to succeed without big gov't intrusion into their lives.
 

Ontologuy

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As a counselor, I can attest that without my charitable sliding scale, few could afford my services.

Unresolved damage inculcated in childhood is a factor in most social tragedies.

Our population has doubled in the past 60 years, and with currently over 323 million people, many crammed like rats in large cities with substandard wages, psychopathologies are exacerbated.

There is no solution short-term, so problems will likely get worse.

I know people who have health insurance, but their insurance doesn't cover necessary therapeutic remedies. Certainly Obamacare policies don't cover this.

Some whose health insurance covers such, they pay very high premiums.

Scarce resources (hospitable land, breathable air, water, road space, living wage jobs, classrooms, etc.) cause high stress for parents which spills over to the children creating childhood neuropsychological damage in the children which they in turn carry into their adult relationships if they don't receive treatment for recovery.

Ultimately, a reduction in population will increase the resource to population ratio, improving family dynamics and reducing childhood damage in family-of-origin.

Economies of scale currently make therapeutic treatment for all who currently suffer unlikely, so prevention into the future is our best hope.

It's a challenge.

Regarding the Orlando tragedy, Mateen, from various accounts suffered from bipolar disorder and was gay himself, though closeted to his family. Couple that with his father's fundamentalist religion's "stone them" attitude toward gays, which inculcated self-loathing in Omar, and his second wife's similar agitation for him to do the "right thing" by his faith .. and this tragedy would have been hard to stop whether he used a gun, fertilizer in a truck out front, C4 strapped to himself, C4 in a fancy package set on a table, nitroglycerin, or some other mass explosive.

There are a number of factors aside from just mental disorders/instability required for a tragedy. Considering the prevalence of mental illness in this country, we'd otherwise have many, many more tragedies than we do.

But the greater the population, the more we'll have. Population reduction is simply the long-term solution to this and many other problems.

Our economy is less controlled with respect to raw capitalism than other industrial nations. We have a neurotically competitive dog-eat-dog win-lose business spirit that's rather intense, and that's not the healthiest environment psychologically, to say the least.

If, however, we had the population of 1955, meaning more resources per capita, we'd have more of a team attitude than an every man for himself attitude. It's the current lack of feeling connected, that everyone is a competitor for scare resources, that causes a lot of problems for parents.

Having 22 million illegal aliens and a "let anyone in as fast as possible to work cheaply" stupid immigration policy exacerbates the problem.

Then we have politicians who are too busy climbing the money-power pyramid to really care about what's happening, and they no longer uphold the Constitutional directive to promote the general welfare and provide for the common defense of American citizens.

In this regard, we have to find a way to compel politicians to work for us American citizens again. This is the best hope in that regard that I've found: Powerful American Political Alliance .
 

BitterPill

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This is a discussion of VIOLENCE. NOT gun control. This about violence in general and what the problem is here in America vs other nations that have similar socioeconomics. What is done differently?

I think violence, at least in this country, is on the wane.
 

DamnYankee

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you dont listen

You don't learn. The left has for decades kept the American family under assault, especially black families, which the left has succeeded in all but destroying.
 

Dragonfly

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This is a discussion of VIOLENCE. NOT gun control. This about violence in general and what the problem is here in America vs other nations that have similar socioeconomics. What is done differently?

I have been pondering this question and with the most recent shooting I truly feel we have a plethora of evidence to discuss this topic at length, and we don't have to continually blame "guns" for general violence problems. Any time an incident of terror or a serial killer or a even down to domestic violence or rape...there is often a very real common trait:

Borderline Personality Disorder - Personality Disorders

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084627.htm

The terrorist with antisocial personality disorder

Personality disorders--Axis II gets short shrift

Personality disorders. It is technically a mental illness. But it isn't the same. It is completely different. It isn't like Down syndrome. These people appear normal, they feel normal, but they suffer from something like deep rage and antipathy. They may not even see humans as anything more than speed bumps between them and their goals.

So with all this evidence: does it make sense that we should try and treat these? Our insurance industry here in America is a major handicap in dealing with mental health. As the final article states: they have put up major roadblocks because of difficulty of treatment. It is a numerical bottom line. A liability concern. They are covering their own ass. And their profit.

So if you wonder why people may seem more well adjusted in another nation? Start to wonder about that. What kind of health care do you get if you have a deep rage control issue due to a past experience? How hard is it for you to get psychotherapy covered? Can you go talk to a psychologist or a psychiatrist? Is that even financially viable?

Is it possible for us to have a good discussion on this without being distracted by the buzz words "Islamic terrorist" or "gun control?" What do you think? Should we be looking at the deeper concern on violence? Are we even trying? Or do you think we are clouded by the media and politicians and the buzz words and this is just pissing in the wind?

How has the media, Hollywood, and gaming industry treated violence over the last few decades?

Has it:

1) glorified it
2) ignored it
3) made it a modern culture phenomena
4) turned it into a money making venture
5) done anything to prevent future violence


Look at what's on TV. In the movies. The top video games. On the news.

Violence makes some people/corporations loads of money.

The modern American culture has embraced violence in so many unhealthy ways it's very difficult to NOT understand why we are where we are today.
 

Skeptic Bob

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What is happening with violent crime is that it has been on a general, slow decline over the past few decades. I am not sure why that is.

However, I think it is obvious why the perception of crime has been on the rise. First it was the advent of 24 hr news cycle, then the wide spread use of the internet, and then the popularity of social media. Before all of that, we just didn't hear about it as much.
 

Howler63

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This is a discussion of VIOLENCE. NOT gun control. This about violence in general and what the problem is here in America vs other nations that have similar socioeconomics. What is done differently?

I have been pondering this question and with the most recent shooting I truly feel we have a plethora of evidence to discuss this topic at length, and we don't have to continually blame "guns" for general violence problems. Any time an incident of terror or a serial killer or a even down to domestic violence or rape...there is often a very real common trait:

Borderline Personality Disorder - Personality Disorders

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084627.htm

The terrorist with antisocial personality disorder

Personality disorders--Axis II gets short shrift

Personality disorders. It is technically a mental illness. But it isn't the same. It is completely different. It isn't like Down syndrome. These people appear normal, they feel normal, but they suffer from something like deep rage and antipathy. They may not even see humans as anything more than speed bumps between them and their goals.

So with all this evidence: does it make sense that we should try and treat these? Our insurance industry here in America is a major handicap in dealing with mental health. As the final article states: they have put up major roadblocks because of difficulty of treatment. It is a numerical bottom line. A liability concern. They are covering their own ass. And their profit.

So if you wonder why people may seem more well adjusted in another nation? Start to wonder about that. What kind of health care do you get if you have a deep rage control issue due to a past experience? How hard is it for you to get psychotherapy covered? Can you go talk to a psychologist or a psychiatrist? Is that even financially viable?

Is it possible for us to have a good discussion on this without being distracted by the buzz words "Islamic terrorist" or "gun control?" What do you think? Should we be looking at the deeper concern on violence? Are we even trying? Or do you think we are clouded by the media and politicians and the buzz words and this is just pissing in the wind?



Actually violent crime AND gun crime are both dropping.

Violent Crime Rates -- US Statistics | National Review Online
 

HenryChinaski

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I've lived in Chicago my whole life. I came on the Chicago public school system in the 70s and 80s. You could get a good education then. The local economy was strong and they were manufacturing jobs aplenty. The south and west side neighborhoods that are now plagued by violence were stable, people had stability and opportunities. Around the time Reagan came along all those factory jobs started closing up shop. Peoples livelihoods just disappeared. These neighborhoods now have no infrastructure there's no investment in them. They're wastelands. So people become desperate and resort to crime, have children then wind up in prison. The children grow up having no positive role model's, no positive reinforcement and the gangs becomes their family. Violence just becomes normal. These crime ridden neighborhoods need infrastructure and opportunities brought into them. That's the way to begin stopping the cycle of violence.
 

blaxshep

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I've lived in Chicago my whole life. I came on the Chicago public school system in the 70s and 80s. You could get a good education then. The local economy was strong and they were manufacturing jobs aplenty. The south and west side neighborhoods that are now plagued by violence were stable, people had stability and opportunities. Around the time Reagan came along all those factory jobs started closing up shop. Peoples livelihoods just disappeared. These neighborhoods now have no infrastructure there's no investment in them. They're wastelands. So people become desperate and resort to crime, have children then wind up in prison. The children grow up having no positive role model's, no positive reinforcement and the gangs becomes their family. Violence just becomes normal. These crime ridden neighborhoods need infrastructure and opportunities brought into them. That's the way to begin stopping the cycle of violence.

Here's why:

Toxic Government by Democrats: Chicago | Frontpage Mag
 

Tanngrisnir

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I believe its a combination of factors. Most notably is the destruction of the family at the hands of liberalism. The state has in essence replaced fathers. Not to mention there is a systematic attack by the left on fatherhood.

I think that the OP meant things based in reality, not your imagination.
 

HenryChinaski

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Blaming a particular political party is naïve and overly simplistic. The same pattern has happened in every major American city and the corrosion started around the same time with the disappearance of manufacturing jobs. All the investments and opportunities happening in my city now are in the white yuppie neighborhoods. Those little micro economies are doing great, very little crime in Lincoln park or Wicker Park. The same kind of changes needs to be brought to the south and west side communities. Not to mention that crime rates in Republican run cities are in the same ballpark.
 
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