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Is this "security measure" legit? Where do you draw the line?

radcen

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I went to purchase some tickets for a local minor league baseball game on the team's website. I detest "convenience fees", but was willing to suck it up and pay it this time. Then I went to the next step, and I had to either log-in to my account or create an account. (I normally buy tickets at the gate) Many businesses will still sell you their product without creating an account. Not this one.

So, I backed out and sent a polite email asking about this, and if I could purchase tickets online without creating an account. This is the response I received back...

"You must create an account to purchase tickets online. It’s a necessary security measure required by the <team> and our 3rd party ticketing system."

Is this "security measure" legit? Maybe I'm too cynical, but it's a friggin' baseball game, not a high-security sensitive piece of technology. Plus, as I mentioned, other businesses have no objection to selling their product without an account, so I don't even buy that it's about my financial security. I call BS on the "security measure". Really, I feel like it's just so the 3rd party ticketing system wants to collect information so they can make more money by selling and reselling it.

I don't necessarily begrudge anyone making money, but I'm a pretty simple guy... I just want to buy a ticket and go to a game. Without jumping through a bunch of dumb-ass hoops in the process.

Where do you draw the line? I'm sure some are reading this and are chomping at the bit to make some enlightening comment such as, "If you don't like their policies, don't buy their product.", but that's just brain dead arrogance. Everybody has some point where they're no longer willing to mindlessly go along and protest publicly about it. Where's that line for you?
 

PirateMk1

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I went to purchase some tickets for a local minor league baseball game on the team's website. I detest "convenience fees", but was willing to suck it up and pay it this time. Then I went to the next step, and I had to either log-in to my account or create an account. (I normally buy tickets at the gate) Many businesses will still sell you their product without creating an account. Not this one.

So, I backed out and sent a polite email asking about this, and if I could purchase tickets online without creating an account. This is the response I received back...

"You must create an account to purchase tickets online. It’s a necessary security measure required by the <team> and our 3rd party ticketing system."

Is this "security measure" legit? Maybe I'm too cynical, but it's a friggin' baseball game, not a high-security sensitive piece of technology. Plus, as I mentioned, other businesses have no objection to selling their product without an account, so I don't even buy that it's about my financial security. I call BS on the "security measure". Really, I feel like it's just so the 3rd party ticketing system wants to collect information so they can make more money by selling and reselling it.

I don't necessarily begrudge anyone making money, but I'm a pretty simple guy... I just want to buy a ticket and go to a game. Without jumping through a bunch of dumb-ass hoops in the process.

Where do you draw the line? I'm sure some are reading this and are chomping at the bit to make some enlightening comment such as, "If you don't like their policies, don't buy their product.", but that's just brain dead arrogance. Everybody has some point where they're no longer willing to mindlessly go along and protest publicly about it. Where's that line for you?

I would just go to the box office at the park. Yes by the way it is bogus as a security measure.
 

Cephus

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Their game, their rules. Don't like their rules, don't go to their game.
 

Deuce

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I went to purchase some tickets for a local minor league baseball game on the team's website. I detest "convenience fees", but was willing to suck it up and pay it this time. Then I went to the next step, and I had to either log-in to my account or create an account. (I normally buy tickets at the gate) Many businesses will still sell you their product without creating an account. Not this one.

So, I backed out and sent a polite email asking about this, and if I could purchase tickets online without creating an account. This is the response I received back...

"You must create an account to purchase tickets online. It’s a necessary security measure required by the <team> and our 3rd party ticketing system."

Is this "security measure" legit? Maybe I'm too cynical, but it's a friggin' baseball game, not a high-security sensitive piece of technology. Plus, as I mentioned, other businesses have no objection to selling their product without an account, so I don't even buy that it's about my financial security. I call BS on the "security measure". Really, I feel like it's just so the 3rd party ticketing system wants to collect information so they can make more money by selling and reselling it.

I don't necessarily begrudge anyone making money, but I'm a pretty simple guy... I just want to buy a ticket and go to a game. Without jumping through a bunch of dumb-ass hoops in the process.

Where do you draw the line? I'm sure some are reading this and are chomping at the bit to make some enlightening comment such as, "If you don't like their policies, don't buy their product.", but that's just brain dead arrogance. Everybody has some point where they're no longer willing to mindlessly go along and protest publicly about it. Where's that line for you?

"A person with this name and address likes baseball" isn't exactly valuable marketing data. Nobody is paying some pissant minor league baseball team for that data.

Did the purchase involve a credit card? Then yes, actually, it is a high-security sensitive piece of technology.
 

USViking

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No-fly got you all worked up?

Maybe counter-terror ops is in the process of setting up a "No-buy" for sporting events, and this online hassle is just the first step onto a slippery slope. ID at the gate is coming soon.

If you don't like it tell it to the judge!
 

ttwtt78640

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"A person with this name and address likes baseball" isn't exactly valuable marketing data. Nobody is paying some pissant minor league baseball team for that data.

Did the purchase involve a credit card? Then yes, actually, it is a high-security sensitive piece of technology.

Folks that will pay an online premium for a locally available product/service (and have a credit card) may be more marketable than you think. ;)
 

Deuce

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Folks that will pay an online premium for a locally available product/service (and have a credit card) may be more marketable than you think. ;)

Google and Facebook have that information, and also know what you like to eat for breakfast. Have you ever looked at your own google profile?
 

Captain Adverse

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I don't use membership cards, and I don't create accounts.

I prefer to buy at the source, and I don't give any personal information when I do. I mean, why does a barber shop need your phone number, zip code, etc., just to cut your hair???

I find it annoying that so many businesses push a requirement to be a member in order to get "sales prices," or ask for all sorts of personal information before providing a service.

IMO it is not a sale if only "members" can get it, because they are actually buying information about you from you. They would not do that if it did not make them a greater profit somehow.

About a month ago I went to a Dental service (Aspen) for an exam. They only cost $19.00 but I had to fill out all this personal information. Thinking it would be private like any other medical service I filled it out.

Over the next three months I began getting all these random sales calls from numbers all over the country! I am on the do not call list which I update regularly, and Aspen was the ONLY place I have given my number to for any reason in the last 2 years.

There is NO REASON to have to "create an account" for sales or services other than for those organizations to track your usage and profit from the information.

I'm with you. Just suck it up and buy the tickets at the window.
 
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ttwtt78640

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Google and Facebook have that information, and also know what you like to eat for breakfast. Have you ever looked at your own google profile?

No, but I have noticed targetted pop up ads based on some recent searches. I often use the internet (via Google) to find product information for both business and personal use.
 

Cephus

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Google and Facebook have that information, and also know what you like to eat for breakfast. Have you ever looked at your own google profile?

They only know what you eat for breakfast if you post that information online or purchase your groceries online. Otherwise, Facebook and Google haven't got the slightest clue.
 

Mycroft

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I went to purchase some tickets for a local minor league baseball game on the team's website. I detest "convenience fees", but was willing to suck it up and pay it this time. Then I went to the next step, and I had to either log-in to my account or create an account. (I normally buy tickets at the gate) Many businesses will still sell you their product without creating an account. Not this one.

So, I backed out and sent a polite email asking about this, and if I could purchase tickets online without creating an account. This is the response I received back...

"You must create an account to purchase tickets online. It’s a necessary security measure required by the <team> and our 3rd party ticketing system."

Is this "security measure" legit? Maybe I'm too cynical, but it's a friggin' baseball game, not a high-security sensitive piece of technology. Plus, as I mentioned, other businesses have no objection to selling their product without an account, so I don't even buy that it's about my financial security. I call BS on the "security measure". Really, I feel like it's just so the 3rd party ticketing system wants to collect information so they can make more money by selling and reselling it.

I don't necessarily begrudge anyone making money, but I'm a pretty simple guy... I just want to buy a ticket and go to a game. Without jumping through a bunch of dumb-ass hoops in the process.

Where do you draw the line? I'm sure some are reading this and are chomping at the bit to make some enlightening comment such as, "If you don't like their policies, don't buy their product.", but that's just brain dead arrogance. Everybody has some point where they're no longer willing to mindlessly go along and protest publicly about it. Where's that line for you?

You need to learn defensive practices when you do stuff online...including buying products.
 

Cephus

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You need to learn defensive practices when you do stuff online...including buying products.

Okay, weird coincidence. Last night I saw this 1970s PSA warning people about bunco artists and I spent the whole time going "nobody is that stupid! Why are these people falling for any of this?"

I say the same thing about anyone who falls for Nigerian scams and any of that.

 

Mycroft

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Okay, weird coincidence. Last night I saw this 1970s PSA warning people about bunco artists and I spent the whole time going "nobody is that stupid! Why are these people falling for any of this?"

I say the same thing about anyone who falls for Nigerian scams and any of that.


For sure, people need to watch out for scams...online and offline...but that's not what I was talking about.

I'm talking about defensive measures against stuff that happens from normal browsing and legit transactions. Such as, set up a separate email for online purchasing...maybe even more than one. That way, the inevitable spam doesn't clog your family or business email accounts. Or, use adblockers with your browser so the ads you get that are caused by your browsing habits never get seen. And using tracking blocking extensions with your browser so the places you visit don't report your activity to an advertising organization in the first place.

If you take these and other defensive measures you'll greatly reduce the effects of your online activities...including online shopping.
 
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