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Good cops...

Bodi

Just waiting for my set...
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These guys do a good job.

 
So familiar... drunk drivers are apparently no different anywhere.
 
These guys do a good job.


Unfortunately, this is the kind of crap police officers across the country have to deal with every day. I don't care if they offered me half a million a year, I would never join law enforcement the way things are today.

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Until I saw videos like this, I never understood why I’d so frequently see one car pulled over and three cop cars surrounding it. I always assumed, “Wow, that person must be a big deal criminal.” Then I saw a video where one guy just refused to be pulled out of his car (sov citizen, no license, no registration, no insurance…the usual sov citizen stuff), and it was extremely easy to hold on to the steering wheel and stay put when it was just the one cop trying to extract him. Here, three cops removed this woman like she was a rag doll, no taser or unusual force necessary.
 
Yup…they handled that well. Of course, they knew they were on camera in a very public way. I’m much more comfortable labeling them as “good cops” if I knew they acted that way when they aren’t in the spotlight…

A good measure of a whether a cop is truly a “good cop”, IMO, is if she is willing to do the right thing even if it means going against the blue line code…
 
Until I saw videos like this, I never understood why I’d so frequently see one car pulled over and three cop cars surrounding it. I always assumed, “Wow, that person must be a big deal criminal.” Then I saw a video where one guy just refused to be pulled out of his car (sov citizen, no license, no registration, no insurance…the usual sov citizen stuff), and it was extremely easy to hold on to the steering wheel and stay put when it was just the one cop trying to extract him. Here, three cops removed this woman like she was a rag doll, no taser or unusual force necessary.
Well, the one cop did have the taser pointed at her face from two feet away... but at least he did not fire.
 
Well, the one cop did have the taser pointed at her face from two feet away... but at least he did not fire.
With multiple cops on site, it certainly doesn't appear to have gotten even close to him needing to fire it at her. But if had been just the one cop trying to extract her? At that point it definitely would have been taser-o-clock
 
With multiple cops on site, it certainly doesn't appear to have gotten even close to him needing to fire it at her. But if had been just the one cop trying to extract her? At that point it definitely would have been taser-o-clock
The cop should try to get the key before using a taser. Once she can not drive off who cares if it takes extra time to get her out non-violently?
 
The cop should try to get the key before using a taser. Once she can not drive off who cares if it takes extra time to get her out non-violently?
So I've seen plenty of videos in which the police go hands on waayyyy too prematurely, and I think that's likely an American quality since we've started to see the increased militarization of the institution as a whole.

That said, I can put myself in the shoes of police when it comes to this type of situation. As a regular part of your policing day, drunks probably make up the vast majority of unpleasant encounters. And if there's one thing I hear over and over and over again, drunks are just the worst. You have no idea what kind of drunk each person is going to be. Door A is sleepy, harmless drunk. Door B is passive-resistant, kind of annoying drunk. Door C is homicidal maniac drunk, one who starts swinging fists at best and possibly has access to a gun you didn't see at worst. Which drunk did you get on this stop? Roll the dice and find out!

So if I was a cop, and I knew that my day could easily consist of a dozen or so drunk encounters per day, I know my face and my body are only going to win the lottery so many times before I finally open Door C. Therefore, if I encounter a drunk, I'm gonna make sure my ass has backup.
 
So I've seen plenty of videos in which the police go hands on waayyyy too prematurely, and I think that's likely an American quality since we've started to see the increased militarization of the institution as a whole.

That said, I can put myself in the shoes of police when it comes to this type of situation. As a regular part of your policing day, drunks probably make up the vast majority of unpleasant encounters. And if there's one thing I hear over and over and over again, drunks are just the worst. You have no idea what kind of drunk each person is going to be. Door A is sleepy, harmless drunk. Door B is passive-resistant, kind of annoying drunk. Door C is homicidal maniac drunk, one who starts swinging fists at best and possibly has access to a gun you didn't see at worst. Which drunk did you get on this stop? Roll the dice and find out!

So if I was a cop, and I knew that my day could easily consist of a dozen or so drunk encounters per day, I know my face and my body are only going to win the lottery so many times before I finally open Door C. Therefore, if I encounter a drunk, I'm gonna make sure my ass has backup.
Have the back-up for sure... just try to be patient and non-violent as long as possible. US cops go hands on too fast. Kiwi and British cops (seen tons of their videos to) just keep chatting with the perp.

And I was in food and wine industry for 15 years, very nice places, restaurants and high end catering, and I had to deal with a lot of drunk people.
 
Where did you get that stat? Source?
From the same place that poster gets everything, its either 99% or zomg you hate cops anarchy raaaagh!
 
Well, the one cop did have the taser pointed at her face from two feet away... but at least he did not fire.
Pretty sure that was pepper spray, not a taser. He even said something close to he would "spray".
 


Worth the time to watch.
 
Have the back-up for sure... just try to be patient and non-violent as long as possible. US cops go hands on too fast. Kiwi and British cops (seen tons of their videos to) just keep chatting with the perp.

And I was in food and wine industry for 15 years, very nice places, restaurants and high end catering, and I had to deal with a lot of drunk people.
There are a lot of people who will bolt even for drunk driving. It isn't uncommon at all for drunk drivers to bolt, which means driving, which is dangerous if they are drunk.
 


Worth the time to watch.


Few notes from watching this video.
1. It really does train cops to view all citizens as threats.
2. It trains cops to ask leading questions or tactics that will help incriminate citizens by not remaining silent. Pause to see if they will try to justify themselves for the accusation of a traffic infraction, asking if the information on the DL is current, asking about having anything dangerous on their person or in the glove compartment (BTW, I keep my documents in a plastic envelope attached to my visor)
3. 80 tickets per week and trying to justify it based on "we are concerned for your safety"? :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes: Zeus have mercy.

Having said that, I generally like the guy's approach. Too many cops don't identify themselves. Too many cops try to play games with why they are pulling someone over to try to get people to incriminate themselves (and thereby creating arguments) by saying things like, "do you know why I pulled you over?" Too many cops use a bogus stop to fish for something else (like the tag lights are "bright enough" to fish to see if they can find drugs).
 
Few notes from watching this video.
1. It really does train cops to view all citizens as threats.
2. It trains cops to ask leading questions or tactics that will help incriminate citizens by not remaining silent. Pause to see if they will try to justify themselves for the accusation of a traffic infraction, asking if the information on the DL is current, asking about having anything dangerous on their person or in the glove compartment (BTW, I keep my documents in a plastic envelope attached to my visor)
3. 80 tickets per week and trying to justify it based on "we are concerned for your safety"? :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes: Zeus have mercy.

Having said that, I generally like the guy's approach. Too many cops don't identify themselves. Too many cops try to play games with why they are pulling someone over to try to get people to incriminate themselves (and thereby creating arguments) by saying things like, "do you know why I pulled you over?" Too many cops use a bogus stop to fish for something else (like the tag lights are "bright enough" to fish to see if they can find drugs).
I like his step in the right direction. Most cops do not identify themselves... many won't even do it when requested.
 
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