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Dimming the sun: The answer to global warming?

azgreg

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https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/23/heal...3T15:40:04&utm_source=twCNN&utm_medium=social

(CNN)Scientists are proposing an ingenious but as-yet-unproven way to tackle climate change: spraying sun-dimming chemicals into the Earth's atmosphere.

The research by scientists at Harvard and Yale universities, published in the journal Environmental Research Letters, proposes using a technique known as stratospheric aerosol injection, which they say could cut the rate of global warming in half.
The technique would involve spraying large amounts of sulfate particles into the Earth's lower stratosphere at altitudes as high as 12 miles. The scientists propose delivering the sulfates with specially designed high-altitude aircraft, balloons or large naval-style guns.

The letter: Stratospheric aerosol injection tactics and costs in the first 15 years of deployment - IOPscience

Didn't these folks see the movie Snowpiercer?
 

Jack Hays

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Somehow I don't think so.

Geoengineering
Could an anti-global warming atmospheric spraying program really work?

What could possibly go wrong~ctm From Eurekalert Public Release: 22-Nov-2018 IOP Publishing A program to reduce Earth’s heat capture by injecting aerosols into the atmosphere from high-altitude aircraft is possible, but unreasonably costly with current technology, and would be unlikely to remain secret. Those are the key findings of new research published today in Environmental…
 

Rexedgar

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Earth is past the tipping point; if your not old, your future is ..............you know!
 

Bum

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I am no engineer, but perhaps orbital solar shades would have the same effect?

I'm sure such an idea brings complications of its own, but I imagine the shades could be made of very light weight material that could unfold to a very large surface area ( mylar type material?)
 

azgreg

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I am no engineer, but perhaps orbital solar shades would have the same effect?

I'm sure such an idea brings complications of its own, but I imagine the shades could be made of very light weight material that could unfold to a very large surface area ( mylar type material?)

Harbor Freight might have enough tarps laying around.
 

Kal'Stang

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Environmental effects

Sulfates occur as microscopic particles (aerosols) resulting from fossil fuel and biomass combustion. They increase the acidity of the atmosphere and form acid rain. The anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and D. vulgaris can remove the black sulfate crust that often tarnishes buildings.[9]
Main effects on climate
An oval map of earth which uses colors to indicate different quantities
Sulfate aerosol optical thickness 2005 to 2007 average

The main direct effect of sulfates on the climate involves the scattering of light, effectively increasing the Earth's albedo. This effect is moderately well understood and leads to a cooling from the negative radiative forcing of about 0.4 W/m2 relative to pre-industrial values,[10] partially offsetting the larger (about 2.4 W/m2) warming effect of greenhouse gases. The effect is strongly spatially non-uniform, being largest downstream of large industrial areas.[11]

The first indirect effect is also known as the Twomey effect. Sulfate aerosols can act as cloud condensation nuclei and this leads to greater numbers of smaller droplets of water. Lots of smaller droplets can diffuse light more efficiently than just a few larger droplets. The second indirect effect is the further knock-on effects of having more cloud condensation nuclei. It is proposed that these include the suppression of drizzle, increased cloud height,[12][full citation needed] to facilitate cloud formation at low humidities and longer cloud lifetime.[13][full citation needed] Sulfate may also result in changes in the particle size distribution, which can affect the clouds radiative properties in ways that are not fully understood. Chemical effects such as the dissolution of soluble gases and slightly soluble substances, surface tension depression by organic substances and accommodation coefficient changes are also included in the second indirect effect.[14]

The indirect effects probably have a cooling effect, perhaps up to 2 W/m2, although the uncertainty is very large.[15][full citation needed] Sulfates are therefore implicated in global dimming. Sulfate is also the major contributor to stratospheric aerosol formed by oxidation of sulfur dioxide injected into the stratosphere by impulsive volcanoes such as the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines. This aerosol exerts a cooling effect on climate during its 1-2 year lifetime in the stratosphere.

Sulfate

Yeah...sounds really safe.....
 

Quaestio

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Climate Hacking Is Barking Mad -Professor Raymond T Pierrehumbert

(Raymond T. Pierrehumbert is the Halley Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford. Previously, he was Louis Block Professor in Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago)

"the idea of “fixing” the climate by hacking the Earth’s reflection of sunlight is wildly, utterly, howlingly barking mad"

"You can’t fix the Earth with these geoengineering proposals, but you can sure make it worse."

https://slate.com/technology/2015/0...ate-hacking-is-dangerous-and-barking-mad.html
 

KevinKohler

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Solar filaments is the best option, but it would get punched full of holes in space, and not be able to hold orbit inside of the atmospheric protection.

Spraying chemicals? Sure. Sounds fantastic. What could go wrong?
 

Bum

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Solar filaments is the best option, but it would get punched full of holes in space, and not be able to hold orbit inside of the atmospheric protection.

Spraying chemicals? Sure. Sounds fantastic. What could go wrong?

If I have been reading correctly....it would not have to be in a low orbit, but rather, at a Lagrange point; I think that would be far enough out to avoid a few issue.


As for the rest, its above my pay grade....I'm not techie smart.
 

Quag

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misleading thread title. I thought they were going to actually make the sun dimmer not just put up some drapes to make it appear dimmer to us
 

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Nope. The stratosphere can radiate heat to the earth. It would be like throwing an extra electric blanket on the bed.

In any case, we should probably be sure that government climate scientists can make accurate long term predictions about the climate before we make plans like this. That they can correctly predict what will happen has by no means been proven.
 

Deuce

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Nope. The stratosphere can radiate heat to the earth. It would be like throwing an extra electric blanket on the bed.

In any case, we should probably be sure that government climate scientists can make accurate long term predictions about the climate before we make plans like this. That they can correctly predict what will happen has by no means been proven.

It's utterly hilarious to see right-wingers suggest geoengineering is a bad idea because we don't understand the potential ramifications adequately.
 

LowDown

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It's utterly hilarious to see right-wingers suggest geoengineering is a bad idea because we don't understand the potential ramifications adequately.

Sure, monkey around with the atmosphere without knowing what the effects will be. That'll work.

"Hilarious"? No, the word I'd use is "pathetic".
 

Deuce

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Sure, monkey around with the atmosphere without knowing what the effects will be. That'll work.

And what, pray tell, is it that you think we're doing now?
 

Lord of Planar

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Lord of Planar

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Earth is past the tipping point; if your not old, your future is ..............you know!

Prove it.

The earth will wobble back as the obliquity has a normal, natural cycle.
 

Lord of Planar

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I am no engineer, but perhaps orbital solar shades would have the same effect?

I'm sure such an idea brings complications of its own, but I imagine the shades could be made of very light weight material that could unfold to a very large surface area ( mylar type material?)

It would take about 492,400 square kilometers in the L1 orbit to affect the earths incoming solar radiation by 1%.

Any idea how expensive that would be?
 

Deuce

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Deuce

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It would take about 492,400 square kilometers in the L1 orbit to affect the earths incoming solar radiation by 1%.

Any idea how expensive that would be?

At least twenty bucks
 

Lord of Planar

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He doesn't mean literal tipping over on its axis.

LOL...

I know. Don't you know a pun when you see it?

I wanted to see if he know anything about obliquity and precession.
 

Bum

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It would take about 492,400 square kilometers in the L1 orbit to affect the earths incoming solar radiation by 1%.

Any idea how expensive that would be?

According to the sources in wiki, it would be a bit pricey.

One proposed sunshade would be composed of 16 trillion small disks at the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrangian point, 1.5 million kilometers above Earth. Each disk is proposed to have a 0.6-meter diameter and a thickness of about 5 micrometers. The mass of each disk would be about a gram, adding up to a total of almost 20 million tonnes.[3] Such a group of small sunshades that blocks 2% of the sunlight, deflecting it off into space, would be enough to halt global warming, giving us ample time to cut our emissions back on earth.[4]
Creating this sunshade in space was estimated to cost in excess of US$5 trillion with an estimated lifetime of 50 years.[8]


But, still a bargain I guess when some folks place the cost of combating global warming in the area of $100 Trillion.


:shrug:
https://www.wnd.com/2017/01/climate-change-fight-bill-100000000000000/
 
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