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What is military science?

loydchase

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i have a west point pamphlet and it says, "military science" as a major. what is that exactly. if possible can you provide a link to a good website for it
 

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i have a west point pamphlet and it says, "military science" as a major. what is that exactly. if possible can you provide a link to a good website for it

You study leadership, military history, staff functions, command structure, training, etc. Every college with an ROTC program has military science classes as well. You don't have to major in them to be an officer, but you do have to take them, as well as meet many other requirements.

Here's a link to the courses at my alma mater (click on the boxes at the bottom)...

https://www.uccs.edu/armyrotc/courses
 

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Military science aims to generate military knowledge and best practices that provide security to a nation. Military science degrees aim to offer an in-depth expertise of several fields like engineering, psychology, strategic methods and technology, all applied to create solutions for military needs and issues. Typical topics covered by military science are: military history, tactics or military logistics, negotiation, human behaviour, electronics and biochemistry.
(Source)

I didn't know military science is a discipline in which one can major/focus....

It's clearly multidisciplinary, as are business degrees, and that makes them pretty cool for that quality makes them fine entryways for obtaining a very broad base of knowledge....Seems like a good "jack of all" kind of degree/find.

Glad you asked a question for which I had no idea of what was the answer. I learned something new.
 
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Tangmo

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This gives an idea of what basic military science subjects are. Rotc military science is about operations, small unit tactics and weapons while leadership has a strong focus. West Point military science focuses on operations, small unit tactics and weapons, leadership, order, discipline. OCS which accepts college graduates only focuses on small unit operations, weapons, tactics (platoon & company). In addition to military science, all cadets at all academic institutions must earn a degree in a civilian major subject field.


Military Science Courses

The ROTC program is comprised of the Basic Course (Freshman/ Sophomore: Year I and Year II) and the Advanced Course (Junior/Senior Year III and Year IV). The Basic Course is designed to introduce students to military leadership, develop basic leadership skills, and present individual challenges. The Advanced Course is focused on preparing students to serve as leaders in the United States Army.


All Basic and Advanced courses include both classroom work and a weekly afternoon lab. Weekend activities are also occasionally required for enrolled students. In addition to the classroom instruction, you will be required to attend the following: weekly physical fitness training; leadership lab once per week; field training exercises taking place at United States Military Installations.

FrontLowerRight.jpg

Army Rotc Paul Revere Battalion MIT, Harvard, Tufts, Wellesley, Leslie, Gordon, Conwell, Salem State.

Basic Course (100/200 Level)

MS 101. Military Leadership (2cr). This course is an introduction to universal leadership skills with emphasis on practical work. Activities in this course may include rappelling, water safety, first aid, physical fitness, and communication.

MS 102. Military Leadership (2cr). This course continues MIL 101 and may include practical field skills, marksmanship, and leadership techniques.

MS 201. Military Leadership (2cr). Theoretical and practical instruction in leadership including written and oral communication, effective listening, assertiveness, personality, motivation, and organizational culture and change. Case studies in leadership and problem solving.

MS 202. Military Leadership (2cr). Examines national and Army values. Apply principles of ethical decision making. Examine the legal and historical foundations, duties, and functions of officers. Introduces basic U.S. Army tactical principles.

MS 204. Rangers (3cr). This course continues the development of cadet competencies and confidence through the study of intermediate leadership, technical, and tactical instruction. To enhance the cadet's historical knowledge of planning and executing small unit, combat missions. To teach and develop combat arms related functional skills relevant to fighting the close combat, direct fire battle.


(continued)
 

Tangmo

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Advanced Course (300/400 Level)

cordell%20in%20flight%202.jpg



MS 301. Military Leadership (3cr). This course addresses principles, objectives, and techniques for leadership. Cadets will apply the functions of a leader and examine special problems in leadership. Cadets will also master the military operations order as related to small unit tactics in the offense and defense. This course emphasizes problem analysis and decision making, delegation and control, planning and organizing, and interpersonal skills for effective leadership.

MS 302. Military Leadership (3cr). The cadet will learn techniques of directing and coordinating individual and team tactics through practical exercises in the local training area. They will apply the principles of leadership as well as develop their potential by planning, preparing, and presenting practical instruction.

MS 327. American Military History (3cr). This is a survey course of American Military History from Pre-Revolutionary War days to the present. We will discuss the evolution of our Armed Forces with a primary emphasis on the U.S. Army.

MS 401. Military Leadership (3cr). Advanced instruction on functions of the US Army officer focusing on skills required for meeting management, subordinate career counseling, Army training management, junior officers and battlefield ethics.

MS 402. Military Leadership (3cr). Study legal aspects of US Army decision making and leadership, Army tactical and strategic organizations, and administrative and logistical management.

https://www.uab.edu/armyrotc/ed-training



INSTRUCTOR, MILITARY SCIENCE

Job Description:
Teaches military subjects, such as employment and deployment of weapons systems, military aspects of geopolitics, and defense concepts. Specializes in teaching subjects concerned with particular branches of military tactics.


For anyone interested there's much more detail on military science coursework and field training application exercises at the link below. For example, the "What now loo-tenant?" nightmare course and field training exercises conceived by the devil himself and that comes straight from his unholy hell :doh

MSL.402 Leadership in a Complex World

Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in
the Contemporary Operating Environment. Students examine differences in customs and
courtesies, military law, principles of war, rules of engagement, international terrorism.
Students also explore aspects of interacting with nongovernmental
organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places
significant emphasis on preparing cadets for their first unit of assignment as Army Second
Lieutenants. Uses case studies, scenarios, and "What now, Lieutenant?" exercises to prepare
cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned
officers in the United States Army, Army Reserves or Army National Guard.

https://army-rotc.mit.edu/sites/default/files/documents/Paul Revere Cadet Handbook 29 JAN 2011.pdf


CHAOS: "Captain has another outstanding idea." :lamo
 

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Command of units larger than a platoon and company requires field grade rank, which is major, lt-col. col, and requires starting with major completing master degree and higher programs at one or more of Army War College, National Defense University, Army Command and Staff College, or the equivalent in Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force. This is true of all junior officers (lt, capt) regardless of whether they graduated Rotc, a government service academy, OCS. In Rotc and at a service academy, you must have a civilian major also. West Point btw is a liberal arts college; OCS requires a college degree on applying.

It's also common for a field grade officer to obtain a master degree from a regular civilian college or university in a field such as national security and strategic studies, international relations, national and global security studies, and the like.

If a colonel wants to be on a possible eligibility track to general officer promotion s/he for sure needs a degree from one or more of the institutions in the paragraph above, or from one of the other services such as Naval War College even though you are in the Army. The Rotc grad Col. James Mattis to name but one earned a master degree in international security and strategy studies from the NDU Institute of International Security Studies -- without such a degree Mattis would not have been eligible for general officer rank/grade.

It's also the case that in each branch of service a potential general officer can be identified for watching or developing early on. This can begin at the officer's rank of captain (O-3). By the time you're colonel and have responded successfully to all the right duty assignments, academic programs, field or functional commands, you know (as do others). In Rotc, a given cadet will know by the middle of his second year that he or another cadet will be it come the beginning of Year IV, i.e., battalion commander of all cadets. In high school jrotc it was going to be me or one of two other cadets. One became my btn executive officer, cadet ltc, the other became S-3 Ops and Training Officer on staff. Indeed, because S-3 ops&trng encompasses everything, it made him senior cadet major on the four member btn staff. However, he didn't like that at all, feeling he should have been number one instead of myself, much less number three which is what S-3 staff officer is ex officio: btn cmdr, btn xo, S-3.

So the cadet major S-3 soon became very much a no-show. Can't have that of course. The regular Army captain in charge of Rotc at the public high school and his nco regulars -- all of 'em on a three year regular Army duty assignment tour -- called in both myself and the cadet btn xo ltc. These Army regulars are the guys who appointed everyone to everything, as they do each year. Yet it wuz the classic punt of What now cadet commander? What's your decisive course of action as the commander of cadets? All five companies of 'em, 273 in all. :doh

Bust the cadet major to captain, remove him from S-3; reassign him as a company commander. Because as a company commander he'd have lock his heels in front of a bunch of cadets looking 'em in the eye and command 'em; lead 'em. Perform his duties in front of cadets assigned to him and before everyone instead of hiding away from a klatch of us in the offices. Promote the cadet captain commanding the company - A company -- to major cause he could do anything he was asked to do. Accordingly, put the new major as S-2 in charge of the MP platoon and the weapons and facilities security where the cadet MP msg knew the ropes and could do everything for him (a position I once had besides). Move the S-2 major to S-3 cause he's one of our best cadets anyway. Presto. Murphy's Law was foiled for the first time in history as it worked perfectly for the rest of the year. :cool:

At uni senior Rotc my single competitor and I became best buddies early on so he was cheerfully my xo cadet ltc throughout Year IV. No hard feelings whatsoever, only good times together all the time in everything. He and I were in fact the only guys on graduation and commissioning to accept the invitation to try out for the Old Guard at Ft. Myer. After a week looking over TOG my buddy volunteered for Vietnam; he got through it just fine. It made me think however that someone would rather go to VN than be in TOG. Turned out neither of us had any regrets about any of it.
 

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i have a west point pamphlet and it says, "military science" as a major. what is that exactly. if possible can you provide a link to a good website for it

'Military Science' is like every other social 'science'. That is not an actual science at all, but a collection of fads and tendentious opinions, subject to change as whims dictate.
 

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What role does deception play in military science?
 

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Command of units larger than a platoon and company requires field grade rank, which is major, lt-col. col, and requires starting with major completing master degree and higher programs at one or more of Army War College, National Defense University, Army Command and Staff College, or the equivalent in Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force. This is true of all junior officers (lt, capt) regardless of whether they graduated Rotc, a government service academy, OCS. In Rotc and at a service academy, you must have a civilian major also. West Point btw is a liberal arts college; OCS requires a college degree on applying.

It's also common for a field grade officer to obtain a master degree from a regular civilian college or university in a field such as national security and strategic studies, international relations, national and global security studies, and the like.

If a colonel wants to be on a possible eligibility track to general officer promotion s/he for sure needs a degree from one or more of the institutions in the paragraph above, or from one of the other services such as Naval War College even though you are in the Army. The Rotc grad Col. James Mattis to name but one earned a master degree in international security and strategy studies from the NDU Institute of International Security Studies -- without such a degree Mattis would not have been eligible for general officer rank/grade.

It's also the case that in each branch of service a potential general officer can be identified for watching or developing early on. This can begin at the officer's rank of captain (O-3). By the time you're colonel and have responded successfully to all the right duty assignments, academic programs, field or functional commands, you know (as do others). In Rotc, a given cadet will know by the middle of his second year that he or another cadet will be it come the beginning of Year IV, i.e., battalion commander of all cadets. In high school jrotc it was going to be me or one of two other cadets. One became my btn executive officer, cadet ltc, the other became S-3 Ops and Training Officer on staff. Indeed, because S-3 ops&trng encompasses everything, it made him senior cadet major on the four member btn staff. However, he didn't like that at all, feeling he should have been number one instead of myself, much less number three which is what S-3 staff officer is ex officio: btn cmdr, btn xo, S-3.

[content deleted for character limit reason]

Red:
Some observations:
  • The military's career development models are quite similar to those in the corporate world, differing, it seems from discussions with my NROTC son, in that the military is somewhat more rigid about the "boxes" one must tick, particularly early in one's career, to pursue a given path.
  • There's a "roadmap;" follow it and one is quite likely to end up at the "C-level." Don't, and one, more likely than not, won't. A nice feature of pursuing the military, rather than civilian path, is that the paths are slightly more clearly defined at the junior to middle levels. Of course, at the top (EVP and higher; generals/admirals), there are no "instructions," just broad guidelines and knowing what one wants to do and doesn't want to do.
  • At the end of the day, success comes down to being a high performer who consistently meets and exceeds expectations.
  • Though there is only one "number one," only one "number two," and so on, so long as one is performing at and consistently obtaining top levels, be it #1 or #6 or even #50 or #100, one's going to do just fine because one's being compared overall against literally tens of thousands of others.
  • Military officers (the high performing ones) aren't, IMO, paid nearly enough, given the nature and extent of professional responsibilities and expectations they obtain at, compared to the corporate world, very early stages in their careers. To wit, in my field, management consulting, we start them at ~$80K, but no recent undergrad is going to be given management/leadership responsibilities for at least five years, and six or seven is typical. In contrast a second lieutenant (2nd LT)will earn ~$60K, lead a platoon, which may consist of ~15- ~50 people. The benefits are roughly comparable -- no (or very low) food, utility, housing and health insurance costs; excellent paid continuing education opportunities, etc. -- yet high performing (top 8% of one's peer group) 2nd LTs (my former firm hires only high performing undergrads) will nonetheless be ~$20K behind in terms of personal wealth development, and that gap does nothing but expand as the years go by.
 

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You make your usual exceptional contribution supported also and no doubt by the able counsel of your NRotc son.


Red:
Some observations:
  • The military's career development models are quite similar to those in the corporate world, differing, it seems from discussions with my NROTC son, in that the military is somewhat more rigid about the "boxes" one must tick, particularly early in one's career, to pursue a given path.


  • If early in one's career means as I'd meant, i.e., Lt and Capt, which I'd assume safely you reference, then there aren't many boxes to check to identify a potential flag officer so far out on the road ahead. At that level it's more who you are. We had a junior officer in The Old Guard who was a ptn leader then cpy cmdr that everyone knew was going to be a flag officer. We all knew it because of who he was, i.e., his leadership qualities in general, his consistency and his attitude which in shorthand I'd describe as gung ho while being likable by everyone too. The grad of Citadel lived army and he breathed army. Moreover, he led by example always out there doing it to show the way to his officers and men -- he was everywhere. We knew this would take him through his field officer years right to the stars.




    [*]There's a "roadmap;" follow it and one is quite likely to end up at the "C-level." Don't, and one, more likely than not, won't. A nice feature of pursuing the military, rather than civilian path, is that the paths are slightly more clearly defined at the junior to middle levels. Of course, at the top (EVP and higher; generals/admirals), there are no "instructions," just broad guidelines and knowing what one wants to do and doesn't want to do.

    I added to your junior and middle levels assessment in the comment above. The rank nomenclature of "general officer" meant you could command anything, which was true for the longest time. Generalist of the highest command level it was. You could go from commanding a corps of infantry one week to commanding an artillery regiment the next week then to command a division of cavalry the week after. Then you could be quartermaster and so on. Now it's more specialized within your own field but the title of general officer is embedded. It remains true, yes, that a general/admiral has much latitude in his command position. The reason is that generals and admirals report to other generals and admirals, so they are attentive to leaving one another to his own command style, manner, authority. The JCS in contrast are cheerlessly bound to civilian authority in the CinC, SecDef and service secretary, while field or function generals/admirals are masters of their own realm.




    [*]At the end of the day, success comes down to being a high performer who consistently meets and exceeds expectations.

    Yes plus the inspiring and magnetism factors of who you are that I'd mentioned. Think Washington, Lee, Sheridan, Teddy Roosevelt, Pershing, MacArthur, Patton, Halsey, Scwartzkopft. Then think Eisenhower, Bradley, Nimitz among many others who were overachievers but gray.



    (continued due to word count)
 

Tangmo

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(continued from scrolling immediately above)


[*]Though there is only one "number one," only one "number two," and so on, so long as one is performing at and consistently obtaining top levels, be it #1 or #6 or even #50 or #100, one's going to do just fine because one's being compared overall against literally tens of thousands of others.

I learned in jrotc and senior rotc that you're only and always being compared to two or three other guys in your immediate environment. That's true in the Army/armed forces too. Your colonel is looking at you and when he looks at you he immediately thinks of two other guys like you. When he sends the one name up to the two-star commanding, you want it to be you so you make certain it is you. Three killer guys competing to be it is tougher by light years than having a thousand of 'em out there. Because and in contrast, the guy in the regiment who comes up short when the colonel thinks of him comes up short because the colonel also thinks of a couple of dozen other guys like him, so he gets lost in the crowd he can see and count right there before and surrounding him.






[*]Military officers (the high performing ones) aren't, IMO, paid nearly enough, given the nature and extent of professional responsibilities and expectations they obtain at, compared to the corporate world, very early stages in their careers. To wit, in my field, management consulting, we start them at ~$80K, but no recent undergrad is going to be given management/leadership responsibilities for at least five years, and six or seven is typical. In contrast a second lieutenant (2nd LT)will earn ~$60K, lead a platoon, which may consist of ~15- ~50 people. The benefits are roughly comparable -- no (or very low) food, utility, housing and health insurance costs; excellent paid continuing education opportunities, etc. -- yet high performing (top 8% of one's peer group) 2nd LTs (my former firm hires only high performing undergrads) will nonetheless be ~$20K behind in terms of personal wealth development, and that gap does nothing but expand as the years go by.
[/LIST]

Colonels and flag officers cash in in the private sector on retirement, to include academia and think tanks etc; so do a number of ltc on retirement. Retired NCO often have a college degree on retirement or get one after separation to get teaching positions or other positions in the private or government sectors. During active duty, officer and nco pay can be tight but you just don't worry about a roof over your head, a shirt on your back or where your next meal is coming from. That you might need food stamps is just a fact of the matter. It's all in the nature of the beast career personnel and their families commit to.
 

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You make your usual exceptional contribution supported also and no doubt by the able counsel of your NRotc son.
TY on my and my son's behalf. His input, along with others, has indeed contributed to my comprehension of the nature of military career paths.
 

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i have a west point pamphlet and it says, "military science" as a major. what is that exactly. if possible can you provide a link to a good website for it

It's figuring out how to kill people in cooler and cooler ways.
 

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i have a west point pamphlet and it says, "military science" as a major. what is that exactly. if possible can you provide a link to a good website for it

It's basic training without the yelling.
 

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Army and Marines get a lot of attention always so let's take a look at Naval Rotc at a couple of colleges and universities.


NC State Naval Rotc Freshman Meet Gunny


No mic required for New Cadet Orientation. Then Gunny starts giving 'em orders rapid fire.

:2rofll:







Washington State University Army Rotc FTX

[4:54] Field Training Exercises








University of Arizona Naval ROTC -- New Student Orientation Week 2017


VG rock and metal music.

New cadets who don't know right from left yet get to carry a large stone in their left hand -- all day.

Build your own boat, get in for the watertight test, then get the sucker the length of the pool on your own. Included is the rapid evacuate ship drill out the hatch.

We rarely see the USN Dizzy Izzy test and it's here too. Afraid of heights? Well, too bad also.

Best Rotc Orientation video available anywhere. UAZ Rotc of Army, Navy AF is a stellar program. As with all Senior Rotc cadets everywhere, the new Midshipmen take the oath of enlistment in the reserve.
 

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What role does deception play in military science?

In many ways deception is critical in warfare.... It is taught both in the tactical and strategic levels.

Example: WWII: A corpse dressed in English military garb washes up on an Axis beach. On his body were found battle plans. Fake plans. Germans spend time and money preparing the wrong site.

All warfare is based on deception. Hence, when we are able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must appear inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.
- Sun Tzu
 

Tangmo

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It's good to see there's Junior Rotc that maintains and upgrades familiar standards, practices, policies.


High School Junior Rotc USMC Battalion of Cadets


We relax through first two minutes of the video after which the fit hits the shan on the assembled new cadets.






Westco High School Army Junior Rotc Obstacle Course on Campus








US Army JROTC Annual RAIDER BRIGADE NATIONAL COMPETITION

2017 JROTC RAIDER NATIONAL CHAMPIONS OBSTACLE COURSE RED KNIGHTS Ft. Myers High School Florida


[3:12]
 
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