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Vegan scolds go Orwellian with proposal to eliminate meat metaphors

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From Thomas Lifson at American Thinker:

If you can control the language people are allowed to use, you can control their minds, as George Orwell masterfully explained. Some (not all) vegans, convinced of their moral superiority in eschewing the flesh of animals, would like to see our language change so as to change or eliminate common English-language expressions like "bring home the bacon" that refer to the eating of meat. https://www.americanthinker.com/blo...ith_proposal_to_eliminate_meat_metaphors.html

Lifson offers a clip of Tucker Carlson riffing on this, saying that he doesn't want to beat a dead horse. :mrgreen:

Here is a bit from the original article, which begins by explaining that meat is a source of societal power of which disadvantaged groups are deprived and that to control the supply of meat is to control the people:

The increased awareness of vegan issues will filter through our consciousness to produce new modes of expression – after all, there’s more than one way to peel a potato. At the same time, metaphors involving meat could gain an increased intensity if the killing of animals for food becomes less socially acceptable. The image of “killing two birds with one stone” is, if anything, made more powerful by the animal-friendly alternative of “feeding two birds with one scone”. If veganism forces us to confront the realities of food’s origins, then this increased awareness will undoubtedly be reflected in our language and our literature.

However, that is not to say that meaty descriptions will be done away with immediately – after all, it can take language a long time to change. And who is to say that even those who choose a vegan or vegetarian diet even want to do away with the meaty descriptions? It is interesting to note that a range of vegetarian burgers have been made to “bleed” like real meat. Although the animal components of such foods are substituted, attempts are made to replicate the carnivorous experience. Beetroot blood suggests the symbolic power of meat may well carry into the age of veganism, in which case the idea of meat as power will also remain in literature for some time to come. https://theconversation.com/how-the-rise-of-veganism-may-tenderise-fictional-language-106576

So "There's more than one way to skin a cat" becomes "...to peel a potato." What a consciousness-raising read!
 
I wonder if any of those vegans ever read or watched a documentary on the evolution of humans? If it wasn't for eating meat (and vegetables) our brains would not have evolved the way that they did and instead would have remained animal like.
 
I wonder if any of those vegans ever read or watched a documentary on the evolution of humans? If it wasn't for eating meat (and vegetables) our brains would not have evolved the way that they did and instead would have remained animal like.

It appears that some have
 
I wonder if any of those vegans ever read or watched a documentary on the evolution of humans? If it wasn't for eating meat (and vegetables) our brains would not have evolved the way that they did and instead would have remained animal like.

Sure, but then we evolved to do all manner of things that are obsolete in modern civilization.
 
most people who don't eat meat don't care if you do or not. it's a personal choice. however, i loathe trophy hunters.
 


You’re welcome. ;)
 
From Thomas Lifson at American Thinker:

If you can control the language people are allowed to use, you can control their minds, as George Orwell masterfully explained. Some (not all) vegans, convinced of their moral superiority in eschewing the flesh of animals, would like to see our language change so as to change or eliminate common English-language expressions like "bring home the bacon" that refer to the eating of meat. https://www.americanthinker.com/blo...ith_proposal_to_eliminate_meat_metaphors.html

Lifson offers a clip of Tucker Carlson riffing on this, saying that he doesn't want to beat a dead horse. :mrgreen:

Here is a bit from the original article, which begins by explaining that meat is a source of societal power of which disadvantaged groups are deprived and that to control the supply of meat is to control the people:

The increased awareness of vegan issues will filter through our consciousness to produce new modes of expression – after all, there’s more than one way to peel a potato. At the same time, metaphors involving meat could gain an increased intensity if the killing of animals for food becomes less socially acceptable. The image of “killing two birds with one stone” is, if anything, made more powerful by the animal-friendly alternative of “feeding two birds with one scone”. If veganism forces us to confront the realities of food’s origins, then this increased awareness will undoubtedly be reflected in our language and our literature.

However, that is not to say that meaty descriptions will be done away with immediately – after all, it can take language a long time to change. And who is to say that even those who choose a vegan or vegetarian diet even want to do away with the meaty descriptions? It is interesting to note that a range of vegetarian burgers have been made to “bleed” like real meat. Although the animal components of such foods are substituted, attempts are made to replicate the carnivorous experience. Beetroot blood suggests the symbolic power of meat may well carry into the age of veganism, in which case the idea of meat as power will also remain in literature for some time to come. https://theconversation.com/how-the-rise-of-veganism-may-tenderise-fictional-language-106576

So "There's more than one way to skin a cat" becomes "...to peel a potato." What a consciousness-raising read!

Breaking: languages change over time, and people are allowed to use any metaphors they'd like.
 
Vegans will be driving up the price of meat, and I will still eat it when we dine out (I have cut back on beef, but order a nicer cut). At home we eat more eggs, pork and poultry but even there we have cut back.

Salads are for sissies....
 
From Thomas Lifson at American Thinker:

If you can control the language people are allowed to use, you can control their minds, as George Orwell masterfully explained. Some (not all) vegans, convinced of their moral superiority in eschewing the flesh of animals, would like to see our language change so as to change or eliminate common English-language expressions like "bring home the bacon" that refer to the eating of meat. https://www.americanthinker.com/blo...ith_proposal_to_eliminate_meat_metaphors.html

Lifson offers a clip of Tucker Carlson riffing on this, saying that he doesn't want to beat a dead horse. :mrgreen:

Here is a bit from the original article, which begins by explaining that meat is a source of societal power of which disadvantaged groups are deprived and that to control the supply of meat is to control the people:

The increased awareness of vegan issues will filter through our consciousness to produce new modes of expression – after all, there’s more than one way to peel a potato. At the same time, metaphors involving meat could gain an increased intensity if the killing of animals for food becomes less socially acceptable. The image of “killing two birds with one stone” is, if anything, made more powerful by the animal-friendly alternative of “feeding two birds with one scone”. If veganism forces us to confront the realities of food’s origins, then this increased awareness will undoubtedly be reflected in our language and our literature.

However, that is not to say that meaty descriptions will be done away with immediately – after all, it can take language a long time to change. And who is to say that even those who choose a vegan or vegetarian diet even want to do away with the meaty descriptions? It is interesting to note that a range of vegetarian burgers have been made to “bleed” like real meat. Although the animal components of such foods are substituted, attempts are made to replicate the carnivorous experience. Beetroot blood suggests the symbolic power of meat may well carry into the age of veganism, in which case the idea of meat as power will also remain in literature for some time to come. https://theconversation.com/how-the-rise-of-veganism-may-tenderise-fictional-language-106576

So "There's more than one way to skin a cat" becomes "...to peel a potato." What a consciousness-raising read!

S'cuse me ma'am....if you are not going to eat that beef burger, could you slide it my way?
 
From Thomas Lifson at American Thinker:

<<snipped>>

If you can control the language people are allowed to use, you can control their minds, as George Orwell masterfully explained. Some (not all) vegans, convinced of their moral superiority in eschewing the flesh of animals, would like to see our language change so as to change or eliminate common English-language expressions like "bring home the bacon" that refer to the eating of meat. . .

Maybe, but I don't really see this catching on in my lifetime or thought control working on many independent minded Americans. A person is either geared toward vegan or not. For the 'nots', and their number is legion, it is more like this:

 
I wonder if any of those vegans ever read or watched a documentary on the evolution of humans? If it wasn't for eating meat (and vegetables) our brains would not have evolved the way that they did and instead would have remained animal like.

Better question yet. Why don't those people get a life? Having started a vegetarian diet not too long ago myself, I understand that some of us have to make a choice we can live with. We all do what our conscience allows. That doesn't mean going to extremes.
 
Q: how do you know if someone is vegan?

A: they will tell you.
 
They're free to use whatever language they wish. What they don't get to do is insist everyone else do as well.
 
And what are we supposed to say instead of: "Where's the beef?"
 
And what are we supposed to say instead of: "Where's the beef?"

Where is the vegetable protein patty that is made to look like beef, a craven idol that cowers in it's Master's shadow?
 
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