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The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of the African American Community

alanford

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Beside the cops shooting African Americans, some human rights advocates in America started to publish information about aggressive policing tactics in minority communities. The level of policing of the black community is facilitated by the surveillance laws and surveillance technology developed for the war on terror.
In January, Alvaro Bedoya wrote an essay in “Slate” exploring the history of FBI surveillance of activists and people of color, using the example of Martin Luther King Jr., and how those practices have advanced with technology. The conference “The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of the African American Community” is shown below in video, 4 parts, it starts with the history of surveillance reaching all the way back to the days of slavery and plantations. The timeline will then jump to World Word I, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the “negro subversion” division of military intelligence, which was formed to spy on black activists. Then, attendees will hear about Martin Luther King Jr. and the days of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and his COINTELPRO program focused on monitoring of social and political activists. The conference was held by Georgetown Law and the Center on Privacy and Technology.

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four

anyone has experience from occupy? any similarity between the war on black America with the war on occupy?
do you share experience about police attacks on African American community? do you keep the gov responsible for that?
 

nota bene

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Re: The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of the African American Communit

What do you wish to discuss?
 

alanford

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Re: The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of the African American Communit

surveillence and racism and people personal experience about it, if they saw such things with their eyes:
anyone has experience from occupy? any similarity between the war on black America with the war on occupy?
do you share experience about police attacks on African American community? do you keep the gov responsible for that?
 

joG

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Re: The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of the African American Communit

Beside the cops shooting African Americans, some human rights advocates in America started to publish information about aggressive policing tactics in minority communities. The level of policing of the black community is facilitated by the surveillance laws and surveillance technology developed for the war on terror.
In January, Alvaro Bedoya wrote an essay in “Slate” exploring the history of FBI surveillance of activists and people of color, using the example of Martin Luther King Jr., and how those practices have advanced with technology. The conference “The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of the African American Community” is shown below in video, 4 parts, it starts with the history of surveillance reaching all the way back to the days of slavery and plantations. The timeline will then jump to World Word I, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the “negro subversion” division of military intelligence, which was formed to spy on black activists. Then, attendees will hear about Martin Luther King Jr. and the days of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and his COINTELPRO program focused on monitoring of social and political activists. The conference was held by Georgetown Law and the Center on Privacy and Technology.

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four

anyone has experience from occupy? any similarity between the war on black America with the war on occupy?
do you share experience about police attacks on African American community? do you keep the gov responsible for that?

War on black America? You're funning me!
 

lpast

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Re: The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of the African American Communit

Sigh, the progressive left always does this song and dance about how horrific aggressive policing in minority neighborhoods and of course white police officers executing blacks.

I wish I could say what I usually do and that the truth is somewhere in the middle in this case its not.

Blacks murder more blacks in minority black neighborhoods daily and its in huge numbers. Since the attack on police by democrats and BLM cops have fundamentally stood down. They are not aggressively policing and the murder rate has SOARED for black on black murder in minority neighborhoods.

Any police officer thats ever worked a minority neighborhoods KNOWS most MOST of the residents there WANT THEM THERE. Because without police they have NOTHING they are prey. They fear for their children going and coming from school. If you have a teen or adult daughter you fear for them coming home from work at night.
You fear drivebys you fear drug dealers the whole array. Police are the only buffer and heres the TRUTH, when police presence is heavy in minority neighborhoods the murder and crimes rates plummet.

I fully admit some of the police tactics I see make me grimace and some I outright cant understand. I do know that police <gasp> are humans and they know fear and every time they go into a situation with knowing violence their adrenaline is through the roof. Theres alot of shooting mistakes being made out of severe consternation brought on by knowing the element that hates them and wants them dead. FEAR, makes you do alot of things you would never do otherwise. That does not justify criminal acts by police or blatant intentional breachs of the trust or violent criminal acts.

After 911 homeland security is what militarized the police. It was believed that there would be more terrorsts attacks and as first responders the mindset is we have to give them the training and equipt to save the public. Thats caused some problems in the tactics and the attitude.

The incessant whining about aggressive policing comes from elements that mostly DO NOT LIVE IN THOSE NEIGHBORHOODS. Like lilywhite white folk that wake up in their lily white neighborhoods look out the window having coffee or sitting outside by their pool. Who get dressed get in their relatively new car and drive to a lily white neighborhood for lunch in a lily white restaurant. You get the idea.

The real deal is in minority neighborhoods the lionshare of the people there are GOOD PEOPLE in a bad place and many are prey. They dont all hate the police in fact most do not.
 
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