• This is a political forum that is non-biased/non-partisan and treats every persons position on topics equally. This debate forum is not aligned to any political party. In today's politics, many ideas are split between and even within all the political parties. Often we find ourselves agreeing on one platform but some topics break our mold. We are here to discuss them in a civil political debate. If this is your first visit to our political forums, be sure to check out the RULES. Registering for debate politics is necessary before posting. Register today to participate - it's free!

Switching political parties.

Should politicians be allowed to keep their seat if they switch?


  • Total voters
    21
  • Poll closed .

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Should members of Congress be allowed to switch party affliction and keep their seats for the remainder of their terms?

According to the following it appears that the majority of switches have been from the Democratic side to the Republican.


I don’t personally think it matters which side benefits the most. I think if you’re elected as a representative for one party the people who elected you should have a say on whether you stay or go.
 

Mycroft

Genius is where you find it.
DP Veteran
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
65,921
Reaction score
25,729
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Conservative
Should members of Congress be allowed to switch party affliction and keep their seats for the remainder of their terms?

According to the following it appears that the majority of switches have been from the Democratic side to the Republican.


I don’t personally think it matters which side benefits the most. I think if you’re elected as a representative for one party the people who elected you should have a say on whether you stay or go.
Yes, they should.

It's up to their voters to decide...in the next election...if they support the decision to switch or not and to vote accordingly.
 

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Yes, they should.

It's up to their voters to decide...in the next election...if they support the decision to switch or not and to vote accordingly.
I imagine that if the representative is a Democrat most likely it was democratic voters who elected him/her to the seat. (Vice versa for Republicans). You vote for someone on the basis of ideology. To some degree when you switch parties it’s because you no longer support the ideology of the party in which you ran. Perhaps you know of examples where even though a member switched they continued to vote along their previous party lines.
 

Mycroft

Genius is where you find it.
DP Veteran
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
65,921
Reaction score
25,729
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Conservative
I imagine that if the representative is a Democrat most likely it was democratic voters who elected him/her to the seat. (Vice versa for Republicans). You vote for someone on the basis of ideology. To some degree when you switch parties it’s because you no longer support the ideology of the party in which you ran. Perhaps you know of examples where even though a member switched they continued to vote along their previous party lines.
I don't know of any examples you ask for. I don't really care.

Like I said in my previous post, it's up to the people who vote for the Congressman to deal with the situation as they see fit.
 

Chomsky

Social Democrat
DP Veteran
Joined
Apr 28, 2015
Messages
52,434
Reaction score
40,183
Location
Third Coast
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Other
'Yes', they should be allowed to switch. They are a representative, firstly, a party member secondly.
 

roguenuke

DP Veteran
Joined
Nov 6, 2007
Messages
43,167
Reaction score
14,797
Location
Rolesville, NC
Gender
Female
Political Leaning
Moderate
Yes. Perhaps it would actually teach voters to check out what their candidates stand for, their actual view on issues, votes on issues, rather than what letter is beside their name.
 

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
'Yes', they should be allowed to switch. They are a representative, firstly, a party member secondly.
Good point. They all say that and if true then why run on a party platform? We are stuck with a two party system because most people vote along party lines. I would wager that a lot of voters don’t even know the details of where their candidates stand. If they are Republicans they vote for Republicans. Vice versa for Democrats.
 

Phys251

1/20/2021: The healing begins
DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 24, 2011
Messages
33,998
Reaction score
17,664
Location
Georgia
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Slightly Liberal
Should members of Congress be allowed to switch party affliction and keep their seats for the remainder of their terms?

According to the following it appears that the majority of switches have been from the Democratic side to the Republican.


I don’t personally think it matters which side benefits the most. I think if you’re elected as a representative for one party the people who elected you should have a say on whether you stay or go.
Let the voters decide.
 

Luce

Weaponized Funk
Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Messages
8,331
Reaction score
3,601
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Other
Yes. Parties have no legal standing. You either got elected or you didn't.
 

Chomsky

Social Democrat
DP Veteran
Joined
Apr 28, 2015
Messages
52,434
Reaction score
40,183
Location
Third Coast
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Other
Good point. They all say that and if true then why run on a party platform? We are stuck with a two party system because most people vote along party lines. I would wager that a lot of voters don’t even know the details of where their candidates stand. If they are Republicans they vote for Republicans. Vice versa for Democrats.
Because with our form of government, it's the only way to efficacy.

CF Duverger's Law
 

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Because with our form of government, it's the only way to efficacy.

CF Duverger's Law
I’m not sure I follow you. Our form of government is a republic (representative). We link ourselves, because of our personal priorities, with a party which closely aligns itself with those issues we deem important.

For instance, Democrats are identified as the party of labor whereas the Republican Party identified with big business. One fiscally liberal; one fiscally conservative. One for greater government control; one for less.

Efficacy is defined as the ability to produce desired results. We elect politicians on the idea that they will produce the results we want.

So, maybe I’m just missing something in what you’re saying.

Edit. Didn’t see your link at first. I’ll look it over.
 

Chomsky

Social Democrat
DP Veteran
Joined
Apr 28, 2015
Messages
52,434
Reaction score
40,183
Location
Third Coast
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Other
I’m not sure I follow you. Our form of government is a republic (representative). We link ourselves, because of our personal priorities, with a party which closely aligns itself with those issues we deem important.

For instance, Democrats are identified as the party of labor whereas the Republican Party identified with big business. One fiscally liberal; one fiscally conservative. One for greater government control; one for less.

Efficacy is defined as the ability to produce desired results. We elect politicians on the idea that they will produce the results we want.

So, maybe I’m just missing something in what you’re saying.

Edit. Didn’t see your link at first. I’ll look it over.
Sorry. I can see I caused confusion using the term, 'efficacy'. I was referring to the limited 'efficacy' of a single independant legislator, vs the combined power of a party. As we can see here in the States, it takes major party to get things done. To remove Trump, I went from an Indie to a Dem, because they are the only party capable of removing him.

As to Duverger's, he states that the natural evolution (devolution?) of a plurlity voting systen (winner takes all), in single member voting districts (one winner), will be to a two party system. There are exceptions, usually limited in time, but the general law pretty much stands.

Check-out the link I earlier gave you, if interested.
 

Drawdown

DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 8, 2019
Messages
11,528
Reaction score
3,029
Gender
Undisclosed
Political Leaning
Undisclosed
Should members of Congress be allowed to switch party affliction and keep their seats for the remainder of their terms?

According to the following it appears that the majority of switches have been from the Democratic side to the Republican.


I don’t personally think it matters which side benefits the most. I think if you’re elected as a representative for one party the people who elected you should have a say on whether you stay or go.
Often they step off as an independent for the remainder of their term I think and just caucus with the other side until they officially run again, but yes they should be able to keep their seat. Just for the LOLZ, I would love to see an election in which everybody was an independent so that people actually had to make an effort to decide who to vote for instead of voting straight party tickets. We would have record low turn out.
 

Vadinho

DP Veteran
Joined
Feb 16, 2013
Messages
4,864
Reaction score
2,269
Location
California
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Very Liberal
Should members of Congress be allowed to switch party affliction and keep their seats for the remainder of their terms?

According to the following it appears that the majority of switches have been from the Democratic side to the Republican.


I don’t personally think it matters which side benefits the most. I think if you’re elected as a representative for one party the people who elected you should have a say on whether you stay or go.
I say no because it is a betrayal to the voters that put you in that seat. Sorry but a deal is a deal. I think any politician that does this on either side is a piece of shit.
 

Felis Leo

Moral clarity is needed
DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 27, 2018
Messages
7,156
Reaction score
6,817
Location
California
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Conservative
Should members of Congress be allowed to switch party affliction and keep their seats for the remainder of their terms?

According to the following it appears that the majority of switches have been from the Democratic side to the Republican.


I don’t personally think it matters which side benefits the most. I think if you’re elected as a representative for one party the people who elected you should have a say on whether you stay or go.
Yes. We elect the person, not the Party. Whether that person should be allowed to keep the seat after they switch party affiliation is a question that only the voters can determine.
 

The Mark

Sporadic insanity normal.
Supporting Member
Monthly Subscriber
DP Veteran
Joined
Sep 9, 2005
Messages
26,020
Reaction score
6,500
Location
Pennsylvania
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Progressive
Should members of Congress be allowed to switch party affliction and keep their seats for the remainder of their terms?

According to the following it appears that the majority of switches have been from the Democratic side to the Republican.


I don’t personally think it matters which side benefits the most. I think if you’re elected as a representative for one party the people who elected you should have a say on whether you stay or go.
The election is where the people have a say.
That, or a recall, which some states have.

I would assume that if a representative got elected, then instantly switched parties and went against everything they had run on, there would be a movement to recall them in the state they came from, even if no system of recall existed before that point.
 

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Sorry. I can see I caused confusion using the term, 'efficacy'. I was referring to the limited 'efficacy' of a single independant legislator, vs the combined power of a party. As we can see here in the States, it takes major party to get things done. To remove Trump, I went from an Indie to a Dem, because they are the only party capable of removing him.

As to Duverger's, he states that the natural evolution (devolution?) of a plurlity voting systen (winner takes all), in single member voting districts (one winner), will be to a two party system. There are exceptions, usually limited in time, but the general law pretty much stands.

Check-out the link I earlier gave you, if interested.
I see nothing I can quibble with in your response and I thank you for taking the time to share it.

I noticed the link you shared after I initially replied to you. Once I saw it I read through it twice. Interesting. I vaguely recall seeing it (or something like it) years ago. I confess I didn’t have the benefit of studying political science in college. Just dabbled in it. It’s a field that’s always interested me.
 

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Often they step off as an independent for the remainder of their term I think and just caucus with the other side until they officially run again, but yes they should be able to keep their seat. Just for the LOLZ, I would love to see an election in which everybody was an independent so that people actually had to make an effort to decide who to vote for instead of voting straight party tickets. We would have record low turn out.
Yes, I think everyone would benefit if all politicians ran as independents. I don’t think your average American would or could take the time to educate themselves, unfortunately. Which of course, most likely result in lower turnout as you say.
 

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
I say no because it is a betrayal to the voters that put you in that seat. Sorry but a deal is a deal. I think any politician that does this on either side is a piece of shit.
That’s how I saw it also - a betrayal. I wouldn’t call them a pos though. Sometimes there’s a good reason to switch. And anyone who does has to know that they might be ending their political career. That can’t be easy.
 

Chomsky

Social Democrat
DP Veteran
Joined
Apr 28, 2015
Messages
52,434
Reaction score
40,183
Location
Third Coast
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Other
I see nothing I can quibble with in your response and I thank you for taking the time to share it.

I noticed the link you shared after I initially replied to you. Once I saw it I read through it twice. Interesting. I vaguely recall seeing it (or something like it) years ago. I confess I didn’t have the benefit of studying political science in college. Just dabbled in it. It’s a field that’s always interested me.
Learning is a life-long process!

"Don't let schooling get in the way of your education"

- Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain)
 

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
The election is where the people have a say.
That, or a recall, which some states have.

I would assume that if a representative got elected, then instantly switched parties and went against everything they had run on, there would be a movement to recall them in the state they came from, even if no system of recall existed before that point.
I’m not sure how easy a recall would be to initiate. But if the switch occurred early in the term it might be worth the effort.
 

Overitall

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
8,136
Reaction score
2,206
Location
Ohio
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Learning is a life-long process!

"Don't let schooling get in the way of your education"

- Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain)
:) I have to be a little more selective on what I give my time to. Don’t have as much of it left.
 

Chomsky

Social Democrat
DP Veteran
Joined
Apr 28, 2015
Messages
52,434
Reaction score
40,183
Location
Third Coast
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Other
:) I have to be a little more selective on what I give my time to. Don’t have as much of it left.
Crazy as it sounds, for the right kind of person there's a lot that can be learned at D - if you do research on the topics you debate and find interest in. Just like teaching makes one a better practitioner, I believe debating (and the research required) makes one more knowledgeable. That's if one is honest & open-minded of course, and willing to put in some effort.
 

rjay

Rocket Surgeon
DP Veteran
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Messages
2,737
Reaction score
1,738
Gender
Undisclosed
Political Leaning
Independent
'Yes', they should be allowed to switch. They are a representative, firstly, a party member secondly.
I agree, I think. A representative is elected to represent the interests of his/her community, and to act as their voice. If the Rep finds that is easier to do so with one party, or the other, that is fine. What is important is that the community being represented, continues to be represented, in a way that serves its interest. If the purpose of the switch is to serve the Reps interest, then vote the bastard out
 
Top Bottom