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Postmaster eyes aggressive changes

grip

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I would so fire this assclown. Trump and Congress are damn idiots for allowing this while pumping trillions of Fed dollars into corporations.


Postmaster general eyes aggressive changes at Postal Service after election

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy has mapped out far more sweeping changes to the U.S. Postal Service than previously disclosed, considering actions that could lead to slower mail delivery in parts of the country and higher prices for some mail services, according to several people familiar with the plans.

DeJoy, a former logistics executive and ally of President Trump, envisions aggressive cost-cutting maneuvers that he and other conservatives say are necessary to strengthen the agency's financial footing. But they also would represent the biggest reshaping of the agency in generations and would likely draw severe criticism from people and organizations that rely on the mail service for timely delivery, particularly in less populated regions of the country.

DeJoy - the first postmaster general without a history at the agency in 28 years - began implementing policies within eight weeks of taking office in mid-June. But he temporarily backed off this week amid heavy criticism that the moves were causing delays in mail delivery and could undermine the November election, which will rely heavily on mail-in ballots because of the coronavirus pandemic.
 
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