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Just walked out of heaven

Kobie

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Sounds cheesy
 

Tanngrisnir

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poweRob

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Have any wine with that cheese? ;)

Seriously, what did you have?

I sampled all sorts but went with a really stinky blue.
 

poweRob

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Nothing quite like a quality cheese shop. Wish I would have know about that one when I was last there. I always head straight for the stronger blues.

There is an amazing one in the area I grew up in.

The Cheese Shop~Carmel 800.828.WINE/Santa Barbara 888.688.VINO

I sampled one of their strongest blues which was soaked in whiskey and fig. It was awesome. The next shop I want to try out that I haven't been to yet is the local pickler... the Barrio Brinery. Can't wait to taste the Garlic Pickle.
 

Lovebug

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Dang, I'm jealous.
 

Tanngrisnir

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France, you gotta visit France.

Several times. It's a fantastic place for cheese. As are England, Italy, Germany....

When I was a student at Unversitat Konstanz, the cheap, super high quality cheese blew me away.
 

Tanngrisnir

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I sampled one of their strongest blues which was soaked in whiskey and fig. It was awesome. The next shop I want to try out that I haven't been to yet is the local pickler... the Barrio Brinery. Can't wait to taste the Garlic Pickle.

The stronger tasting and smelling it is, the more I like it.

Last summer when at a Shakespeare in the Park outdoor performance in Dallas, we got supplies at a Central Market and I bought some Tilsit. Prolly the strongest smelling cheese I've ever encountered (and deelish).
 

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The stronger tasting and smelling it is, the more I like it.

Last summer when at a Shakespeare in the Park outdoor performance in Dallas, we got supplies at a Central Market and I bought some Tilsit. Prolly the strongest smelling cheese I've ever encountered (and deelish).

not a stinky blue but peel 2 8 0z. wheels of brie, cube it into 1" pieces. Microwave 1/4 c. dried apricots, 2tbsp. honey, 1 tsp. dried rosemary,1/4 tsp. each salt/pepper, in a bowl for 1 minute, until softened and fragrant. Add brie, toss. Transfer to a 10" cast iron skillet and bake until cheese is melted, about 10 to 15 minutes, in a 400 degree oven on middle rack. Drizzle it with 2 tbsp. honey and a tbsp. of minced chives, sprinkled on top . Serve it with your favorite cracker or Melba toast. I like it paired with a creamy Chard or Prosecco.


Italy. Gotta go to Italy
 

Tanngrisnir

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not a stinky blue but peel 2 8 0z. wheels of brie, cube it into 1" pieces. Microwave 1/4 c. dried apricots, 2tbsp. honey, 1 tsp. dried rosemary,1/4 tsp. each salt/pepper, in a bowl for 1 minute, until softened and fragrant. Add brie, toss. Transfer to a 10" cast iron skillet and bake until cheese is melted, about 10 to 15 minutes, in a 400 degree oven on middle rack. Drizzle it with 2 tbsp. honey and a tbsp. of minced chives, sprinkled on top . Serve it with your favorite cracker or Melba toast. I like it paired with a creamy Chard or Prosecco.


Italy. Gotta go to Italy

I've only ever been to Trieste, which many Italians told me is the most un-Italian city, and Valle d'Aosta (home of Fontina!), and loved them both.

Oh, almost forgot: I have relatives in central Switzerland (Thun) and it's a damned hair-on-fire cheese hurricane whenever I'm there.
 
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PoS

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France, you gotta visit France.

Been there.

Italy. Gotta go to Italy
Been there.

Here's a pic I took of the cheese making factory in Emilia-Romagna a few years back. They gave us lots of free samples. Yum!

GD7Lwo6.jpg
 

Parrish

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I've only ever been to Trieste, which many Italians told me is the most un-Italian city, and Valle d'Aosta (home of Fontina!), and loved them both.

Mezza-mezza Napolitano-Milanese , here . Little bit country, little more couth.:cool: Love both.
 

poweRob

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I've only ever been to Trieste, which many Italians told me is the most un-Italian city, and Valle d'Aosta (home of Fontina!), and loved them both.

Oh, almost forgot: I have relatives in central Switzerland (Thun) and it's a damned hair-on-fire cheese hurricane whenever I'm there.

No
****ing
Way

I grew up in Valdosta, Georgia.

After being bypassed by the railroad and losing the county seat, Troupville was virtually abandoned. It had been named after Governor George Troup, for whom Troup County, Georgia, was also named. Valdosta was named after Troup's plantation, Valdosta (occasionally the Val d'Osta spelling was used for the plantation). Troup had named it after the Valle d'Aosta in Italy. The name Aosta (Latin: Augusta), refers to Emperor Augustus. A long-standing rumor held that the city's name meant "vale of beauty."

link...
 

beefheart

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I've been forgetting to go to this place for years. Now I just went.

Ha...we go to this place in old town snottsdale called Hops and Vines....burrata cheese platter with heirloom tomatoes and pesto and balsalmic reduction with bread and crackers and strawberries and grapes and....mmmmmmllagh..

And all local beer menu on tap...
 

Tanngrisnir

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No
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I grew up in Valdosta, Georgia.

After being bypassed by the railroad and losing the county seat, Troupville was virtually abandoned. It had been named after Governor George Troup, for whom Troup County, Georgia, was also named. Valdosta was named after Troup's plantation, Valdosta (occasionally the Val d'Osta spelling was used for the plantation). Troup had named it after the Valle d'Aosta in Italy. The name Aosta (Latin: Augusta), refers to Emperor Augustus. A long-standing rumor held that the city's name meant "vale of beauty."

link...

Huh. Never occurred to me to make that connection. Good catch.
 

Lovebug

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Several times. It's a fantastic place for cheese. As are England, Italy, Germany....

When I was a student at Unversitat Konstanz, the cheap, super high quality cheese blew me away.

Europe is a foodie delight. Lets go.
 

ModerationNow!

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Nothing quite like a quality cheese shop. Wish I would have know about that one when I was last there. I always head straight for the stronger blues.

There is an amazing one in the area I grew up in.

The Cheese Shop~Carmel 800.828.WINE/Santa Barbara 888.688.VINO

About 11 years ago, I was at the grocery store, and decided to buy ingredients for some homemade pasta dish. I needed parmigiana cheese, but for some reason, I chose not to buy shredded parmigiana in a bottle. I saw a Kraft parmigiana wedge of roughly 6oz. I bought it, came home, and for some reason(again), I decided to cut a piece of it and eat it by itself. In America, parmigiana is mostly seen as a 'seasoning', not as something to be eaten alone! I had previously read that parmigiana has a very strong flavor, which made it a healthier choice, because you don't need much of it as a seasoning.

But when I took a bite of it, I was instantly impressed and confused as to why it's not much better known as a stand-alone cheese option to be eaten not just in 'shredded seasoning form'! Since then I've tried MANY more brands, and although the Italian parmigiana is considered the best(and most expensive), I actually prefer a good American parmigiana for eating whole, because the Italian parmigiana is just too dry, crumbly, with too much crunchy-crystalline consistency. Whereas American is cheaper AND a little more moist and less crystally!
 

Tanngrisnir

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About 11 years ago, I was at the grocery store, and decided to buy ingredients for some homemade pasta dish. I needed parmigiana cheese, but for some reason, I chose not to buy shredded parmigiana in a bottle. I saw a Kraft parmigiana wedge of roughly 6oz. I bought it, came home, and for some reason(again), I decided to cut a piece of it and eat it by itself. In America, parmigiana is mostly seen as a 'seasoning', not as something to be eaten alone! I had previously read that parmigiana has a very strong flavor, which made it a healthier choice, because you don't need much of it as a seasoning.

But when I took a bite of it, I was instantly impressed and confused as to why it's not much better known as a stand-alone cheese option to be eaten not just in 'shredded seasoning form'! Since then I've tried MANY more brands, and although the Italian parmigiana is considered the best(and most expensive), I actually prefer a good American parmigiana for eating whole, because the Italian parmigiana is just too dry, crumbly, with too much crunchy-crystalline consistency. Whereas American is cheaper AND a little more moist and less crystally!

Oh, yeah. I just got back a few weeks ago from having a birthday giftcard from Eataly LA (and it's a fantasy land of Italian goodness, believe me) and my wife does not at all enjoy or pursue the cheeses I follow.

It's so extreme that I decided to spend the whole thing on Italian Palma de Prosciutto, and just get her cheeses she prefers.

One of them, according to the monger there, was a high-altitude Peccorino that was like none other. Well over 7000 feet where those sheep graze, and the cheese looked like diamonds in crayons. It KILLED. I even have the name of the farmer. I know where he lives. The whole bit.

Don't be confused about cheese.

The best thing about it? EVERYONE who makes it wants to talk about it.
 

poweRob

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About 11 years ago, I was at the grocery store, and decided to buy ingredients for some homemade pasta dish. I needed parmigiana cheese, but for some reason, I chose not to buy shredded parmigiana in a bottle. I saw a Kraft parmigiana wedge of roughly 6oz. I bought it, came home, and for some reason(again), I decided to cut a piece of it and eat it by itself. In America, parmigiana is mostly seen as a 'seasoning', not as something to be eaten alone! I had previously read that parmigiana has a very strong flavor, which made it a healthier choice, because you don't need much of it as a seasoning.

But when I took a bite of it, I was instantly impressed and confused as to why it's not much better known as a stand-alone cheese option to be eaten not just in 'shredded seasoning form'! Since then I've tried MANY more brands, and although the Italian parmigiana is considered the best(and most expensive), I actually prefer a good American parmigiana for eating whole, because the Italian parmigiana is just too dry, crumbly, with too much crunchy-crystalline consistency. Whereas American is cheaper AND a little more moist and less crystally!

I'll definitely keep that in mind for my next serious cheese purchase. We've been buying parmigiana flakes instead of the powder that comes in the jars. We like to put the flakes on asparagus we cooked up in olive oil.
 

ModerationNow!

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I'll definitely keep that in mind for my next serious cheese purchase. We've been buying parmigiana flakes instead of the powder that comes in the jars. We like to put the flakes on asparagus we cooked up in olive oil.

Parmigiana is actually a relatively mild flavored cheese. Its my favorite for eating out of hand. Unlike with moist cheddars, which are usually cut into thick, square chunks, I'll cut parm into thin slices of no more than 2-4mm thick, and eat it like that, on crackers or alone. There are significant differences in flavor between brands, and its definitely not always true that the most expensive is the best.
 

poweRob

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Parmigiana is actually a relatively mild flavored cheese. Its my favorite for eating out of hand. Unlike with moist cheddars, which are usually cut into thick, square chunks, I'll cut parm into thin slices of no more than 2-4mm thick, and eat it like that, on crackers or alone. There are significant differences in flavor between brands, and its definitely not always true that the most expensive is the best.

Those super thin flakes is like what we put on asparagus. And pasta some times as well.
 
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