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Irish War of Independence

Tigerace117

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After watching a mini series about the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Rising my question is, were the British defeated militarily by the IRA in the succeeding https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_War_of_Independence or was it a voluntary British withdrawal? Either way it was a the beginning of the end for the empire.

A bit of both I'd say. After World War One England had no stomach for a long, costly war so close to home, and the IRA's attacks on English intelligence officers, RIC personnel and British Army troops proved to them that that's what would be the case.

Not to mention the King of England was very unhappy with the activity of the Black and Tans(hell, who wouldn't be?).

Both sides knew they couldn't keep things up indefinitely---the IRA had far more civilian support then it did actual troops, and the British knew that things were going to descend into a quagmire in which the Empire spent lives and money with no solution in sight.

That's why it's a mix of both IMO.
 

Carjosse

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A bit of both I'd say. After World War One England had no stomach for a long, costly war so close to home, and the IRA's attacks on English intelligence officers, RIC personnel and British Army troops proved to them that that's what would be the case.

Not to mention the King of England was very unhappy with the activity of the Black and Tans(hell, who wouldn't be?).

Both sides knew they couldn't keep things up indefinitely---the IRA had far more civilian support then it did actual troops, and the British knew that things were going to descend into a quagmire in which the Empire spent lives and money with no solution in sight.

That's why it's a mix of both IMO.

You pretty much hit on the head but I would not say it was a mix, it was a military defeat. The British just really did not want to fight and realized they could never win public sentiment back for Ireland being part of the UK.
 
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