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Illinois has a Stand Your Ground law and Obama voted for it

Wehrwolfen

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Only Section 2 actually relates to a “Castle Doctrine”. Only Section 2 is tied to a place. All three sections were amended by the same wording from SB 2386:


In no case shall any act involving the use of force justified under this Section give rise to any claim or liability brought by or on behalf of any person acting within the definition of “aggressor” set forth in Section 7-4 of this Article, or the estate, spouse, or other family member of such a person, against the person or estate of the person using such justified force, unless the use of force involves willful or wanton misconduct.

The law does not state a duty to retreat, therefore in Illinois there is no duty to retreat. Illinois is one of 33 states with no duty to retreat. No duty to retreat IS Stand Your Ground.

I’m Sorry Dave, You Got it Wrong | musing minds

Read more:
Illinois has a Stand Your Ground law and Obama voted for it | Flopping Aces

One of the few times Barack Obama voted for a Bill in the Illinois Senate.
 

Fisher

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I read somewhere he was a co-sponsor of the Stand Your Ground law in Illinois, but I don't know if that is true or not.
 

Wiseone

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The Castle Doctrine is not the same as Stand Your Ground.
 

MaggieD

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The Castle Doctrine is not the same as Stand Your Ground.
What are the differences? The only one I know i that SYG laws apply outside of one's home....?
 

longview

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What are the differences? The only one I know i that SYG laws apply outside of one's home....?
Texas has a Castle Doctrine that extends to your car, but that is not a SYG.
 

MaggieD

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Texas has a Castle Doctrine that extends to your car, but that is not a SYG.
Stand Your Ground laws have gotten a really bad rap. It's not much different than any other self-defense law. It still has to be self-defense. People make such a big freakin' deal out of it; and it's most useful benefit is that people are immune from civil suit if SYG is invoked.
 

American

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The Castle Doctrine is not the same as Stand Your Ground.
It may or may not be the same; in some cases state castle laws include provisions for self-defense wherever a person may lawfully be.
 

ecofarm

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Texas has a Castle Doctrine that extends to your car, but that is not a SYG.
Texas is a "no duty to retreat" state, anywhere someone is legal to be.
 

American

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Zimmerman was laying on the ground, and couldn't retreat. End of story.
 

Black Dog

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Castle law in Florida extends to your house, car and place of business. SYG covers all other legal area's.
 

Wehrwolfen

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The Castle Doctrine is not the same as Stand Your Ground.
Give that man a cigar.

Duty to retreat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Some U.S. jurisdictions require that a person retreat from an attack, and allow the use of deadly force in self-defense only when retreat is not possible or when retreat poses a danger to the person under attack. The duty to retreat is not universal, however. For example, police officers are not required to retreat when acting in the line of duty. Similarly, some courts have found no duty to retreat exists when a victim is assaulted in a place where the victim has a right to be, such as within one's own home.[1] The Model Penal Code[2] suggests statutory language that also recognizes an exception to the usual duty to retreat when the victim of the attack is in his or her own dwelling or place of work. It is common to exempt a person's home or car from the duty to retreat, known as the castle doctrine.

Many states employ stand your ground laws that do not require an individual to retreat and allow one to match force for force, deadly force for deadly force. The Washington State Supreme Court, for example, has ruled "that there is no duty to retreat when a person is assaulted in a place where he or she has a right to be."[3][4]

Castle doctrine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A Castle Doctrine (also known as a Castle Law or a Defense of Habitation Law) is an American legal doctrine that designates a person's abode (or, in some states, any legally-occupied place [e.g., a vehicle or workplace]) as a place in which that person has certain protections and immunities permitting him, in certain circumstances, to use force (up to and including deadly force) to defend against an intruder -- free from legal responsibility/prosecution for the consequences of the force used.[1] Typically deadly force is considered justified, and a defense of justifiable homicide applicable, in cases "when the actor reasonably fears imminent peril of death or serious bodily harm to himself or another".[1] The doctrine is not a defined law that can be invoked, but a set of principles which is incorporated in some form in the law of most states.

The legal concept of the inviolability of the home has been known in Western Civilization since the age of the Roman Republic.[2] The term derives from the historic English common law dictum that "an Englishman's home is his castle." This concept was established as English law by 17th century jurist Sir Edward Coke, in his The Institutes of the Laws of England, 1628.[3] The dictum was carried by colonists to the New World, who later removed "English" from the phrase, making it "a man's home is his castle", which thereby became simply the Castle Doctrine.[3] The term has been used in England to imply a person's absolute right to exclude anyone from his home, although this has always had restrictions, and since the late twentieth century bailiffs have also had increasing powers of entry.[4]

25 States use the "Stand Your Ground Law"

The laws of Self Defense are basically universal.
 
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