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First surgery

Moon

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.

Monday I had my right hip replaced. I've had severe osteoarthritis for several years and thought most of my issues were related to my weight. I've lost over 100 pounds the last year or so, but the pain in my hip was getting worse, not better. My doc referred me to a surgeon who took one look at my x-ray and just said "yeah, that's going to have to be replaced". It was really difficult to see where the ball ended and the socket began, so I really couldn't argue with him.

Surgery went fine, lasted about two hours. Of course, I was asleep for it. Turns out I have a "sensitivity" to anesthesia, so my stint in the recovery room was about three+ hours as opposed to the one hour I was told to expect.

I was also given an epidural that was supposed to wear off within a few hours, but now it's four days post-op and my right leg from the knee to my ankle is numb, and I don't have complete control of the muscles yet. Spoke to my surgeon's office yesterday and they want me back in on Monday if it persists.

Recovery has been uncomfortable. Came home on Tuesday and can only get around with a walker. My wife helps me out a bunch, and I'm really lucky to have her. Because of the lack of muscle control, if I'm not careful I'll end up on the floor, which has happened a few times, but nothing serious.

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?
 

Mizzy22

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.

Monday I had my right hip replaced. I've had severe osteoarthritis for several years and thought most of my issues were related to my weight. I've lost over 100 pounds the last year or so, but the pain in my hip was getting worse, not better. My doc referred me to a surgeon who took one look at my x-ray and just said "yeah, that's going to have to be replaced". It was really difficult to see where the ball ended and the socket began, so I really couldn't argue with him.

Surgery went fine, lasted about two hours. Of course, I was asleep for it. Turns out I have a "sensitivity" to anesthesia, so my stint in the recovery room was about three+ hours as opposed to the one hour I was told to expect.

I was also given an epidural that was supposed to wear off within a few hours, but now it's four days post-op and my right leg from the knee to my ankle is numb, and I don't have complete control of the muscles yet. Spoke to my surgeon's office yesterday and they want me back in on Monday if it persists.

Recovery has been uncomfortable. Came home on Tuesday and can only get around with a walker. My wife helps me out a bunch, and I'm really lucky to have her. Because of the lack of muscle control, if I'm not careful I'll end up on the floor, which has happened a few times, but nothing serious.

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?

A guy at our YMCA had the hip surgery,has been rehabbing walking in the swimming pool.
 

Lord Tammerlain

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I had my gall bladder removed. In the hospital in morning and out by 4 pm, done on a friday, back to work on monday
 

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The only surgery, if you want to call it that, that I have ever had was a vasectomy. Not too bad though it was on an Army base so their bedside manner wasn’t great.
 

Moon

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I had my gall bladder removed. In the hospital in morning and out by 4 pm, done on a friday, back to work on monday
I was happy to hear it was a two hour procedure and just an overnight stay. I'd rather be home than in the hospital. Glad your surgery went so well.
 

RileyCoyote

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Best wishes for a speedy recovery!
 

haymarket

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.

Monday I had my right hip replaced. I've had severe osteoarthritis for several years and thought most of my issues were related to my weight. I've lost over 100 pounds the last year or so, but the pain in my hip was getting worse, not better. My doc referred me to a surgeon who took one look at my x-ray and just said "yeah, that's going to have to be replaced". It was really difficult to see where the ball ended and the socket began, so I really couldn't argue with him.

Surgery went fine, lasted about two hours. Of course, I was asleep for it. Turns out I have a "sensitivity" to anesthesia, so my stint in the recovery room was about three+ hours as opposed to the one hour I was told to expect.

I was also given an epidural that was supposed to wear off within a few hours, but now it's four days post-op and my right leg from the knee to my ankle is numb, and I don't have complete control of the muscles yet. Spoke to my surgeon's office yesterday and they want me back in on Monday if it persists.

Recovery has been uncomfortable. Came home on Tuesday and can only get around with a walker. My wife helps me out a bunch, and I'm really lucky to have her. Because of the lack of muscle control, if I'm not careful I'll end up on the floor, which has happened a few times, but nothing serious.

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?

You have my sincere sympathies and best wishes for a complete recovery.

I am now 69 - a couple of years ago I was riding my bike and a driver ran me off the road, I crashed into a steep curb and went over the handlebars and landed on my shoulder breaking my collarbone in two different places in three pieces. Because of the severe break, they urged I get surgery and I did. That was the first time in my life I had to do that.

I was scared to death and convinced I would die when under. When I woke up I was the most surprised person in the room.

I have always had the males fear of being catheterized - I remember telling the doctor I did not want a hose jammed up my dick and he laughed - and he then told me that would not be necessary. But when I woke up I could not urinate so they fought with me for ninety minutes to get the procedure and I insisted nobody was going to do that. I finally relented and it was really no big deal and in a weird way I am glad it happened so that fear was taken away from me as I expect the next 20 years may see more surgery if I am normal.

He also told me that I would not need to go to rehab. Of course, I did when I developed frozen shoulder and that process took another three months.

It sound like your complications and recovery are far more serious than mine was - probably because replacing a hip is worse than what I had done. The thing that I most remember is not being able to use my right arm for two months and a simple thing like just wiping my own butt because a big deal trying to learn to use the left arm. Sleeping was bad for the first week as I had to sleep on my back and I am a stomach sleeper. And it was a good month before I could lay on my right side.

But hang in there my friend as its all worth it in the end. Like they say - if it does not kill you it makes you stronger. I know it did for me and I learned a lot and am thankful for the experience.

Get well and take care of yourself. You will be back on the golf course next spring.
 

OldFatGuy

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.

Monday I had my right hip replaced. I've had severe osteoarthritis for several years and thought most of my issues were related to my weight. I've lost over 100 pounds the last year or so, but the pain in my hip was getting worse, not better. My doc referred me to a surgeon who took one look at my x-ray and just said "yeah, that's going to have to be replaced". It was really difficult to see where the ball ended and the socket began, so I really couldn't argue with him.

Surgery went fine, lasted about two hours. Of course, I was asleep for it. Turns out I have a "sensitivity" to anesthesia, so my stint in the recovery room was about three+ hours as opposed to the one hour I was told to expect.

I was also given an epidural that was supposed to wear off within a few hours, but now it's four days post-op and my right leg from the knee to my ankle is numb, and I don't have complete control of the muscles yet. Spoke to my surgeon's office yesterday and they want me back in on Monday if it persists.

Recovery has been uncomfortable. Came home on Tuesday and can only get around with a walker. My wife helps me out a bunch, and I'm really lucky to have her. Because of the lack of muscle control, if I'm not careful I'll end up on the floor, which has happened a few times, but nothing serious.

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?

Wishing you the best and easiest, as well as a quick recovery. I've been under the knife more times than I can easily recall, and I am heading back after Thanksgiving for another. During my last hospital stay, just weeks ago, the scars on my back and legs made me a celebrity for the staff. Being at an educational hospital, I was asked the same questions repeatedly by young doctors doing their residencies. Most were shocked by the explanations, one fainted on viewing my back and legs. Old wounds, war wounds, but no less frightening at times even to the most inured medical providers. On my lower left abdomen is a 1.5 inch deep scar from a spear, that had to heal from the bottom up, rather than be closed, so it could be cleaned as it healed preventing infection. That one horrifies most of them, as does the 6" scar on my left leg where shrapnel was removed. The individual bullet scars they take in stride. Then there are the scars on my legs from having tumors removed. Cancer scares everyone, with good reasons, even when benign. The pain can last for years, a bit for a lifetime. Each wound, each patient unique. I've been fortunate to keep surviving, and I find the advances in modern medicine phenomenal, tho we have much further to advance.

Be thankful, time will cure, and you enjoy a procedure that did not exist a mere century ago. Have fun on the golf courses of your future.
 

Xelor

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.

Monday I had my right hip replaced. I've had severe osteoarthritis for several years and thought most of my issues were related to my weight. I've lost over 100 pounds the last year or so, but the pain in my hip was getting worse, not better. My doc referred me to a surgeon who took one look at my x-ray and just said "yeah, that's going to have to be replaced". It was really difficult to see where the ball ended and the socket began, so I really couldn't argue with him.

Surgery went fine, lasted about two hours. Of course, I was asleep for it. Turns out I have a "sensitivity" to anesthesia, so my stint in the recovery room was about three+ hours as opposed to the one hour I was told to expect.

I was also given an epidural that was supposed to wear off within a few hours, but now it's four days post-op and my right leg from the knee to my ankle is numb, and I don't have complete control of the muscles yet. Spoke to my surgeon's office yesterday and they want me back in on Monday if it persists.

Recovery has been uncomfortable. Came home on Tuesday and can only get around with a walker. My wife helps me out a bunch, and I'm really lucky to have her. Because of the lack of muscle control, if I'm not careful I'll end up on the floor, which has happened a few times, but nothing serious.

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?

Red:
I've had only one, but it was awesome.
  • They put me on a dilaudid drip before the surgery.
  • Fully anesthetized me for the surgery.
  • Dilaudid drip for two days after the surgery.
  • Returned home to be waited on "hand and foot" for a month.
  • Caught up on the television shows I'd DVR'd and hadn't got to watch.
  • Ate great food.
  • Slept a lot.
The only downside was that my fitness regimen was highly curtailed, so I had to work out a good deal harder and follow a stricter diet for several weeks after my recuperation period to get back into shape.
 

lurchadams

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.

Monday I had my right hip replaced. I've had severe osteoarthritis for several years and thought most of my issues were related to my weight. I've lost over 100 pounds the last year or so, but the pain in my hip was getting worse, not better. My doc referred me to a surgeon who took one look at my x-ray and just said "yeah, that's going to have to be replaced". It was really difficult to see where the ball ended and the socket began, so I really couldn't argue with him.

Surgery went fine, lasted about two hours. Of course, I was asleep for it. Turns out I have a "sensitivity" to anesthesia, so my stint in the recovery room was about three+ hours as opposed to the one hour I was told to expect.

I was also given an epidural that was supposed to wear off within a few hours, but now it's four days post-op and my right leg from the knee to my ankle is numb, and I don't have complete control of the muscles yet. Spoke to my surgeon's office yesterday and they want me back in on Monday if it persists.

Recovery has been uncomfortable. Came home on Tuesday and can only get around with a walker. My wife helps me out a bunch, and I'm really lucky to have her. Because of the lack of muscle control, if I'm not careful I'll end up on the floor, which has happened a few times, but nothing serious.

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?

I'm 57 as well, other than the penis-reduction haven't had anything replaced yet :)

I can certainly feel the aches and pains you get when you're almost six decades old.

One thing you have that I don't is a wife. I know you're not taking that for granted and hope that you never do!

I hope the rest of your recovery is trouble-free and hope to see you on the links this spring, dude!
 

OldFatGuy

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I was happy to hear it was a two hour procedure and just an overnight stay. I'd rather be home than in the hospital. Glad your surgery went so well.

Hospital cuisine just keeps bringing me back. Last stay I read a NY Post (I was so bored:) ) piece about Zombie Possums in Central Park coming out to die, that night they served mystery meatloaf for dinner. I stuck with the veggies and fruit only.
 

lurchadams

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The only surgery, if you want to call it that, that I have ever had was a vasectomy. Not too bad though it was on an Army base so their bedside manner wasn’t great.

I've had a vasectomy as well! Snip, snip, hooray!
 

Rexedgar

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You have my sincere sympathies and best wishes for a complete recovery.

I am now 69 - a couple of years ago I was riding my bike and a driver ran me off the road, I crashed into a steep curb and went over the handlebars and landed on my shoulder breaking my collarbone in two different places in three pieces. Because of the severe break, they urged I get surgery and I did. That was the first time in my life I had to do that.

I was scared to death and convinced I would die when under. When I woke up I was the most surprised person in the room.

I have always had the males fear of being catheterized - I remember telling the doctor I did not want a hose jammed up my dick and he laughed - and he then told me that would not be necessary. But when I woke up I could not urinate so they fought with me for ninety minutes to get the procedure and I insisted nobody was going to do that. I finally relented and it was really no big deal and in a weird way I am glad it happened so that fear was taken away from me as I expect the next 20 years may see more surgery if I am normal.

He also told me that I would not need to go to rehab. Of course, I did when I developed frozen shoulder and that process took another three months.

It sound like your complications and recovery are far more serious than mine was - probably because replacing a hip is worse than what I had done. The thing that I most remember is not being able to use my right arm for two months and a simple thing like just wiping my own butt because a big deal trying to learn to use the left arm. Sleeping was bad for the first week as I had to sleep on my back and I am a stomach sleeper. And it was a good month before I could lay on my right side.

But hang in there my friend as its all worth it in the end. Like they say - if it does not kill you it makes you stronger. I know it did for me and I learned a lot and am thankful for the experience.

Get well and take care of yourself. You will be back on the golf course next spring.

I had my first hip replacement in 2013. There was a problem with voiding the bladder and they had to cat me. I had I’d done once before after a small surgical procedure and that felt like it was coated with sandpaper. After the hip, I kept getting fuller and fuller and they used an ultra-sound device to see how full I was. Finally I relented and this nurse performed a much less painful cat. Turns out they sent me home with the cat and the bag. I had the set-up for about a week and there is one advantage as I see it. I didn’t have to pause the tv when the urge hit, just keep an eye on the quantity.
 

Helix

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One of my family members has had a hip replacement and, more recently, his knee. I hope that you recover quickly.
 

Rexedgar

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The only surgery, if you want to call it that, that I have ever had was a vasectomy. Not too bad though it was on an Army base so their bedside manner wasn’t great.


When I first enlisted I was looked over by different departments. When it came to the dentist, the hygienist said, ‘well at least you brush!” And then told she could tell I was right-handed by the way the teeth were ‘worn,’ if that’s the right word for a 20 year old’s teeth.

A while later I needed wisdom tooth removal and the dentist stood on my chest and used what appeared to be automotive pliers to crush and remove all four in one shot. The wasn’t much in the way of “bedside manner” there either.
 

Hari Seldon

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.

Monday I had my right hip replaced. I've had severe osteoarthritis for several years and thought most of my issues were related to my weight. I've lost over 100 pounds the last year or so, but the pain in my hip was getting worse, not better. My doc referred me to a surgeon who took one look at my x-ray and just said "yeah, that's going to have to be replaced". It was really difficult to see where the ball ended and the socket began, so I really couldn't argue with him.

Surgery went fine, lasted about two hours. Of course, I was asleep for it. Turns out I have a "sensitivity" to anesthesia, so my stint in the recovery room was about three+ hours as opposed to the one hour I was told to expect.

I was also given an epidural that was supposed to wear off within a few hours, but now it's four days post-op and my right leg from the knee to my ankle is numb, and I don't have complete control of the muscles yet. Spoke to my surgeon's office yesterday and they want me back in on Monday if it persists.

Recovery has been uncomfortable. Came home on Tuesday and can only get around with a walker. My wife helps me out a bunch, and I'm really lucky to have her. Because of the lack of muscle control, if I'm not careful I'll end up on the floor, which has happened a few times, but nothing serious.

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?

I had meniscus surgery to clean up my left knee in my thirties. Still hurts sometimes especially after I have bowled 3 games but the surgery itself was quick and easy. My daughter just had her ACL replaced in her right knee. Only 2 hours and they take a part of her hamstring for the new ligament. No more cadavers. Amazing. She is walking fine and running on a treadmill underwater. Rehabbing daily and its only been about 10 weeks. Oh to be 19 again. Good luck on a speedy recovery.
 

joko104

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Numerous heart surgeries. Happened quickly. For seemingly no reason I fell and said "give me a minute" before getting up, feeling exhausted though no reason. Agreed to go to ER. EKG hook up and within minutes I hear the doctor at the small local hospital saying angrily on the phone "what do you mean it's raining too hard to fly?! " (Medivac helicopter). So an 80 mph ambulance ride to the nearby big city, 2 paramedics in the back, one reading off monitor numbers into the cell phone.
At that hospital's ER after monitor pads put on me, a doctor introduced himself as a heart surgeon - and he didn't beat around the bush. "Either we do open heart surgery now or you die. Your chances if we do the surgery are 50-50. What is your decision?" Some decisions in life are difficult to make, but not that one: "Do it." That was ten years ago.
About a month ago on a Saturday morning I started feeling INTENSE chest pain but did NOT want to go to the ER again - decided to ride it out. The pain was extreme and my sense was if it is going to kill me, get it over with. This continued all thru Saturday and Sunday. When I did go to the doctor he made it very clear I should never do that again and yes, some more damage was done because of not coming in.
Turns out my heart is quite messed up and now it seems I'm always in for one thing or another increasingly. After the latest heart procedure, the surgeon drew out a rough drawing of my heart and the major veins to it.
With a red pen he said "this one is completely blocked, so is this one, this one and this one. However, this one here - the LAST one - has branched out to here, here and here." I'm not sure how to interpret, "it is not impossible you can still live a full life." It is not impossible I won't die soon?
He said there is no reason for me to curtail any activity, which I interpreted as just keep going long as I can. He said this is what he meant. I may have a year. Or 5 years. May have decades, can't really say. The one vein branching out like that was good news, but will that keep working? I take 6 scripts a day for my heart, I think he just wrote out a prescription for everything he could think of. Yet I have no symptoms other than I can become exhausted quicker and noticed I walk slower than in the past.
I have already been in twice just this year for some heart procedure and the heart surgeon called me this morning - more bad news. Seems my aorta has problems "though that can wait a while," but now problems in my leg main veins. I'm starting to get to know the people in the surgical room almost like they are family members.
They told me they put me under a little deeper than typical because I "get combative" when lightly put under. I suppose that is one possible instinctive reaction a person may have to people cutting on and stabbing you, right?
 
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Rexedgar

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Numerous heart surgeries. Happened quickly. For seemingly no reason I fell and said "give me a minute" before getting up, feeling exhausted though no reason. Agreed to go to ER. EKG hook up and within minutes I hear the doctor at the small local hospital saying angrily on the phone "what do you mean it's raining too hard to fly?! " (Medivac helicopter). So an 80 mph ambulance ride to the nearby big city, 2 paramedics in the back, one reading off monitor numbers into the cell phone.
At that hospital's ER after monitor pads put on me, a doctor introduced himself as a heart surgeon - and he didn't beat around the bush. "Either we do open heart surgery now or you die. Your chances if we do the surgery are 50-50. What is your decision?" Some decisions in life are difficult to make, but not that one: "Do it." That was ten years ago.
About a month ago on a Saturday morning I started feeling INTENSE chest pain but did NOT want to go to the ER again - decided to ride it out. The pain was extreme and my sense was if it is going to kill me, get it over with. This continued all thru Saturday and Sunday. When I did go to the doctor he made it very clear I should never do that again and yes, some more damage was done because of not coming in.
Turns out my heart is quite messed up and now it seems I'm always in for one thing or another increasingly. After the latest heart procedure, the surgeon drew out a rough drawing of my heart and the major veins to it.
With a red pen he said "this one is completely blocked, so is this one, this one and this one. However, this one here - the LAST one - has branched out to here, here and here." I'm not sure how to interpret, "still, it is not impossible you can still leave a full life." I take 6 scripts a day for my heart, I think he just wrote out a prescription for everything he could think of. Yet I have no symptoms other than I can become exhausted quicker and noticed I walk slower than in the past.
I have already been in twice just this year for some heart procedure and the heart surgeon called me this morning - more bad news. Seems my aorta has problems "though that can wait a while," but now problems in my leg main veins. I'm starting to get to know the people in the surgical room almost like they are family members.
They told me they put me under a little deeper than typical because I "get combative" when lightly put under. I suppose that is one possible instinctive reaction a person may have to people cutting on and stabbing you, right?

Take care; I too have become all too familiar with the sight of hospital ceiling tile moving past as I get rolled here and there.

I had a procedure once that the recovery from the anestesia. They insert a breathing tube down your throat and this guy had knocked all the bark off of the inside. The sore throat was worse than the incision pain.
 

<alt>doxygen

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.

Monday I had my right hip replaced. I've had severe osteoarthritis for several years and thought most of my issues were related to my weight. I've lost over 100 pounds the last year or so, but the pain in my hip was getting worse, not better. My doc referred me to a surgeon who took one look at my x-ray and just said "yeah, that's going to have to be replaced". It was really difficult to see where the ball ended and the socket began, so I really couldn't argue with him.

Surgery went fine, lasted about two hours. Of course, I was asleep for it. Turns out I have a "sensitivity" to anesthesia, so my stint in the recovery room was about three+ hours as opposed to the one hour I was told to expect.

I was also given an epidural that was supposed to wear off within a few hours, but now it's four days post-op and my right leg from the knee to my ankle is numb, and I don't have complete control of the muscles yet. Spoke to my surgeon's office yesterday and they want me back in on Monday if it persists.

Recovery has been uncomfortable. Came home on Tuesday and can only get around with a walker. My wife helps me out a bunch, and I'm really lucky to have her. Because of the lack of muscle control, if I'm not careful I'll end up on the floor, which has happened a few times, but nothing serious.

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?

I've had more than a few. The most intense were the cervical laminectomy and a disk fusion. I'm pretty gonzo, so I was back in the gym within a week after each. The longest recovery time was a severe rotator cuff tear. I wasn't ever a golfer, but no more baseball/softball for me.

Good luck. Sounds like you're doing okay. Actually, that epidural might still be blocking some pain. I had one of those wear off once. I stupidly refused the Oxy the docs tried to give me. I was pacing and grinding my teeth for about 4 hours in the middle of the night waiting for the pharmacy to open.
 

maxparrish

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I'm 57 and recently underwent my first surgery, which seemed to surprise a lot of people in my Doctor's office and also the hospital. Apparently, surgery is a more common thing than I thought it was.
...

And so it goes. Looking forward to getting a clean bill of health and being able to play golf again this spring after several years away from the course. It's already been an improvement not having the pain from the bone on bone contact.

What have your experiences with surgery been like?

I recently had prostate surgery and, like you, my doctors seemed very surprised I'd never had surgery (I'm 67). A few things I noted:

- Surgery prep seems to done outside of the hospital. I suppose its a modern cost measure, but I was a little surprised to not have a day in hospital prior to surgery (for meds, bathing, laxative, etc.). So that part was annoying.

- The efficiency was kinda stunning to me. I reported at 6am, put on a cozy gurney, got a final prep, and waited with other's lined up in the pre-op room. I dozed, at a preset time I was wheeled in and slid to the op table. I was on the table maybe five seconds when the mask was put on and in a second or two I was under (the rapidity was surprising). It seemed like one second later a ethereal woman's voice was telling me to breath deeper as I woke, the low O2 sensor buzzing whenever my breathing was not deep enough. Its was over so fast (actually a 4hr surgery) I couldn't really grasp it.

- When I got to my hospital bed, I slept (I love sleeping, esp. in a cozy room under meds). When I woke I found myself in a private "suite" overlooking the Oakland-bay bridge. Modern room, nice big screen TV, an alcove to sit in when I felt better (the night view of the city was awesome). The cath was uncomfortable but not horrible, the stomach sore if I moved, but I enjoyed it otherwise. The staff was very attentive and responsive, the food fine, and they were so nice. I enjoyed it so much I hinted that if they wanted to keep me longer than overnight, I'd be receptive.

- I've always been easy going when sick - I figure it is what it is. However, other than the usual surgical pains (and next day constipation) I actually enjoyed the experience - like a 4 star hotel, sleeping under meds.

The hospital was only three or four years old, the efficiency and friendliness of staff were amazing, and the technology pretty amazing as well (my surgery is with a "robotic" system, the surgeon does it by video screen). And the entire experience, including my surgical team, was under the skills and care of women. Never saw a male staffer on the floor for two days (did see quite a few pretty young lasses, though).
 
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haymarket

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I had my first hip replacement in 2013. There was a problem with voiding the bladder and they had to cat me. I had I’d done once before after a small surgical procedure and that felt like it was coated with sandpaper. After the hip, I kept getting fuller and fuller and they used an ultra-sound device to see how full I was. Finally I relented and this nurse performed a much less painful cat. Turns out they sent me home with the cat and the bag. I had the set-up for about a week and there is one advantage as I see it. I didn’t have to pause the tv when the urge hit, just keep an eye on the quantity.

The neat thing about the experience is now you can share the battle stories.
 

Logician Man

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I've had 5 surgeries. The most memorable one occurred when I was 16. I was broadsided by a freight train,woke up briefly a few times for a second or two before losing consciousness underneath the front of the locomotive before finally blacking out for good. Went into a 4 day coma,flatlined twice ( so I was told ), had my skull drilled to relieve pressure on the brain, and ended up in tact at the end with not a broken bone or any other long term effects....My gall bladder surgery at the age of 55 was by far the most painful of the 5, bar none. Wouldn't wish that one on anyone.
 

Trippy Trekker

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My first non-dental related surgery occurred at the age of 22 during Summer 1979. I had a right side inguinal hernia repaired in Shands Teaching Hospital on the University of Florida campus. By the end of that same week, I went with my dad to one of my favorite resorts in Negril, Jamaica. I wanted my dad to invest in Jamaican real estate. He declined. He watched me cliff dive. He loved climbing to a mountain top Rastafarian home and discussing philosophy with the head of household. The two men, my father and the Rasta, had deep-rooted differences in their respective world views.
During our stay, Hurricane David took aim on Jamaica. It made my dad very nervous. I asked our host what he planned on doing. The host answered "Go to my home and ride it out." I said "See dad." He said "Son, you're not asking the right questions." My dad flew home before the hurricane hit the island. I stayed... and rode it out.

During January 2010, I underwent repeat hernia surgery. The surgeon told me to slow down my physical activity.

During February 2017, I underwent prostate surgery. The pre-op procedures caused more than a bit of discomfort: computer cable width tube with running water stuck down my tiny penis hole .. and a policeman size flashlight-like device stuck up my rectum. The Urologist, his assistant, my wife and the entire lobby came in to look on the monitor at my 99th percentile in size prostate.... all laughing except me. I felt way way better about life in general (and peeing specifically) post surgery!

Related Thread to the Prostate Surgery -

https://www.debatepolitics.com/health-care/279100-thanks-obamacare.html
 

Moon

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I've had more than a few. The most intense were the cervical laminectomy and a disk fusion. I'm pretty gonzo, so I was back in the gym within a week after each. The longest recovery time was a severe rotator cuff tear. I wasn't ever a golfer, but no more baseball/softball for me.

Good luck. Sounds like you're doing okay. Actually, that epidural might still be blocking some pain. I had one of those wear off once. I stupidly refused the Oxy the docs tried to give me. I was pacing and grinding my teeth for about 4 hours in the middle of the night waiting for the pharmacy to open.
I have some Oxy, but only taking it when I really need it. Mostly taking Tylenol right now.
 
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