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Your steak is more expensive, but Ontario beef farmers aren't getting the biggest cut

TU Curmudgeon

B.A. (Sarc), LLb. (Lex Sarcasus), PhD (Sarc.)
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From the CBC


A new study commissioned by the Beef Farmers of Ontario suggests cattle farmers aren't necessarily cashing in on high beef prices at the butcher counter.

Since the pandemic began in March of 2020, the price of beef has risen significantly, from as little as six per cent for a kilogram of ground beef, to as much as 24 per cent for some premium cuts of steak, such as prime rib, according to data from Statistics Canada.

While customers are getting sticker shock at the grocery store or restaurant, the share of the price increase for farmers like Belinda Bowman, the owner of BB Cattle Co., based outside of Lucan, Ont., are getting lost somewhere between field and plate.

"If you look at that, I wouldn't say that we have gained 25 per cent in terms of animals we're butchering for wholesale," she said, noting the cost of a bushel of corn, a key ingredient for feeding cattle has risen 40 per cent over the last year.

"Like everything right now, our costs have also gone up."

...

Between 2016 and 2021, the study suggests, the price of cattle stayed relatively flat, increasing by only 2.8 per cent, while over the same period, the price of wholesale beef rose 27 per cent, or, a rate nearly 10 times as high.

COMMENT:-

Does anyone know if the same phenomenon occurred in the US?​
 
From the CBC


A new study commissioned by the Beef Farmers of Ontario suggests cattle farmers aren't necessarily cashing in on high beef prices at the butcher counter.

Since the pandemic began in March of 2020, the price of beef has risen significantly, from as little as six per cent for a kilogram of ground beef, to as much as 24 per cent for some premium cuts of steak, such as prime rib, according to data from Statistics Canada.

While customers are getting sticker shock at the grocery store or restaurant, the share of the price increase for farmers like Belinda Bowman, the owner of BB Cattle Co., based outside of Lucan, Ont., are getting lost somewhere between field and plate.

"If you look at that, I wouldn't say that we have gained 25 per cent in terms of animals we're butchering for wholesale," she said, noting the cost of a bushel of corn, a key ingredient for feeding cattle has risen 40 per cent over the last year.

"Like everything right now, our costs have also gone up."

...

Between 2016 and 2021, the study suggests, the price of cattle stayed relatively flat, increasing by only 2.8 per cent, while over the same period, the price of wholesale beef rose 27 per cent, or, a rate nearly 10 times as high.

COMMENT:-
Does anyone know if the same phenomenon occurred in the US?​
Yes. It happens here, too.

It's all about energy prices. That affects EVERYTHING.
 
Everything is getting more expensive. Beef requires a lot of grain, and the grain is going through the roof. Fuel is skyrocketing so shiping of all foodstuffs is going up.
 
everything is going to s**t
 
From the CBC


A new study commissioned by the Beef Farmers of Ontario suggests cattle farmers aren't necessarily cashing in on high beef prices at the butcher counter.

Since the pandemic began in March of 2020, the price of beef has risen significantly, from as little as six per cent for a kilogram of ground beef, to as much as 24 per cent for some premium cuts of steak, such as prime rib, according to data from Statistics Canada.

While customers are getting sticker shock at the grocery store or restaurant, the share of the price increase for farmers like Belinda Bowman, the owner of BB Cattle Co., based outside of Lucan, Ont., are getting lost somewhere between field and plate.

"If you look at that, I wouldn't say that we have gained 25 per cent in terms of animals we're butchering for wholesale," she said, noting the cost of a bushel of corn, a key ingredient for feeding cattle has risen 40 per cent over the last year.

"Like everything right now, our costs have also gone up."

...

Between 2016 and 2021, the study suggests, the price of cattle stayed relatively flat, increasing by only 2.8 per cent, while over the same period, the price of wholesale beef rose 27 per cent, or, a rate nearly 10 times as high.

COMMENT:-
Does anyone know if the same phenomenon occurred in the US?​
Yes, the biggest cut is taken by the processors.
 
Everything is getting more expensive. Beef requires a lot of grain, and the grain is going through the roof. Fuel is skyrocketing so shiping of all foodstuffs is going up.
Over the past FOUR+ years?
 
No over the past year and a half.
The article covered a much longer time span than that.

And your "everything has gone up" doesn't really explain the fact that one level has gone up roughly an order of magnitude more than the other.
 
The article covered a much longer time span than that.

And your "everything has gone up" doesn't really explain the fact that one level has gone up roughly an order of magnitude more than the other.
Beef will go up more than pork and pork more than chicken. They all eat feed, and the feed went up. Chickens are most efficient. Pigs less efficient and cows the most inefficient. So cattle goes up at the highest rate.
The article covered a much longer time span than that.

And your "everything has gone up" doesn't really explain the fact that one level has gone up roughly an order of magnitude more than the other.
Did you read your article? It is talking about how the prices rose a lot in the past two years. It talks about years before that only to point out it did not rise that fast prior to 2020.
 
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