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Voter Verified Balloting

H

hipsterdufus

I wonder if this is why, Walden W. O'Dell, the CEO of Diebold resigned this week.

Like I've said before - Howard Dean hacked one of these machines in ten minutes. This is a bipartisan issue.

New tests fuel doubts about vote machines

A top election official and computer experts say computer hackers could easily change election results, after they found numerous flaws with a state-approved voting-machine in Tallahassee.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/state/13410061.htm
 

scottyz

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Diebold announced it will no longer be doing business with North Carolina because NC wanted its experts to see the source code and Diebold refused. Diebold asked for an exception to this rule and it was denied. None of the other voting machine makers have had a problem showing their source code.
 
H

hipsterdufus

scottyz said:
Diebold announced it will no longer be doing business with North Carolina because NC wanted its experts to see the source code and Diebold refused. Diebold asked for an exception to this rule and it was denied. None of the other voting machine makers have had a problem showing their source code.
Thanks for the info Scotty - I didn't know that.

BTW - I'm not one of those people who think all of the elections have been stolen - but there is a valid the perception that there is corruption in our current process.

Could you imagine making a MAC transaction and being denied a receipt?
 

scottyz

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hipsterdufus said:
Thanks for the info Scotty - I didn't know that.

BTW - I'm not one of those people who think all of the elections have been stolen - but there is a valid the perception that there is corruption in our current process.

Could you imagine making a MAC transaction and being denied a receipt?
It's been a story with pretty much zero coverage by the main stream press. NC requires the voting machine maker to reveal its source code to NC's experts, but not publicly. Diebold says it can't do that because their machine contains Microsoft Software... :roll: :lol: They asked for an exception in court and lost. This oh so secret source code was mistakenly left to be freely downloaded from their FTP servers a few years ago. :doh

In a classic case of “if we don’t play my way I’m taking my toys and going home,” electronic voting machine manufacturer Diebold has announced that it will no longer do business in North Carolina because the state refused to grant an exception that would let Diebold keep its source code secret. After more voting machine blunders in 2004 (little things, like how it was discovered that even monkeys can hack Diebold gear), North Carolina passed a law that requires e-voting vendors to place their source codes in escrow as a precaution against future irregularities, meaning that the state is not even asking Diebold to reveal its code publicly. Nonetheless, Diebold claims that because their machines contain some Microsoft software, they don’t have to right to release the code. Okay folks, which explanation sounds more reasonable: A. Diebold is willing to lose an entire state’s worth of business in order to protect Microsoft or themselves on the off-chance of a successful lawsuit or B. Diebold is petrified that their code is so full of security flaws, and other “issues” that should it ever be scrutinized
http://www.engadget.com/entry/1234000680070378/
 
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