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The Kara impact

Rostocker

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The Kara impact structure is located in Russia and 70 million years old. The crater was initially around 130 km big, not much smaller than the Chicxulub impact crater which was formed when the extinction event asteroid hit Yucatan roughly 5 million years later.

What makes the Kara structure so interesting is, that it had almost the level of Chicxulub but caused no global extinction event. It appears it caused no long lasting damage and flora and fauna continued to thrieve.

What mae th Chicxulub impact so different? Kara impacted on dry land, Chicxulub in a shallow sea and what made things worse it hit Gips, which released enormous amounts of sulfides into the atmosphere.

It appears such large scale impacts are far more complex than we think about them. The result of the impact appears to depend not only on size and speed of the impaktor but also where it hits.
 

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I imagine the concept might be similar to a volcanic eruption, in terms of the particulate matter released into the atmosphere. Eruptions that occur deep in the northern or southern hemisphere generally confine their emissions to that hemisphere. Whereas large volcanos that erupt near the equator can blanket the entire planet in a shroud, potentially darkening the sun, leading to mass death and even extinction, depending on how long it lasts.
 

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I imagine the concept might be similar to a volcanic eruption, in terms of the particulate matter released into the atmosphere. Eruptions that occur deep in the northern or southern hemisphere generally confine their emissions to that hemisphere. Whereas large volcanos that erupt near the equator can blanket the entire planet in a shroud, potentially darkening the sun, leading to mass death and even extinction, depending on how long it lasts.

Depends, the Wilkesland impact in Antarctica caused the biggest mass extinction in the planets history at the end of the permian.

As i said, your point can be one aspect but i guess its very complex.
 

Irredentist

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Depends, the Wilkesland impact in Antarctica caused the biggest mass extinction in the planets history at the end of the permian.

As i said, your point can be one aspect but i guess its very complex.

Perhaps if the impact is big enough it doesn't matter where it hits?
 
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