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Should Congress Formally Censure or Reprimand Child Molester Dennis Hastert?

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A week from tomorrow, June 22, the longest serving Republican House Speaker in American history, a man two heartbeats away from the president of the US for eight years – will be entering a federal prison.

Dennis Hastert openly admitted in court he spent part of his life as a serial child molester.

Hastert’s alma mater, Wheaton College, has removed his name from its government center.

The Wresting Hall of Fame rescinded their award to him.

For the first time in its history, Northern Illinois University revoked an honorary degree, saying: “[A]dmission of criminal activity and sexual abuse of children does not reflect the values of the university or the spirit in which the degree was awarded.”

While these organizations have rushed to distance themselves from the former House Speaker, the House of Representatives, the association we most think of when talking about the man, has yet to consider any reprimand or censure.

Yes, former members of Congress have been censured before - it doesn't happen often, but this is no ordinary congressman gone bad.

Will Congress distance themselves by officially acknowledging and formally rebuke him for his crimes?

Should they?
 

Captain Adverse

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A week from tomorrow, June 22, the longest serving Republican House Speaker in American history, a man two heartbeats away from the president of the US for eight years – will be entering a federal prison.

Dennis Hastert openly admitted in court he spent part of his life as a serial child molester.

Hastert’s alma mater, Wheaton College, has removed his name from its government center.

The Wresting Hall of Fame rescinded their award to him.

For the first time in its history, Northern Illinois University revoked an honorary degree, saying: “[A]dmission of criminal activity and sexual abuse of children does not reflect the values of the university or the spirit in which the degree was awarded.”

While these organizations have rushed to distance themselves from the former House Speaker, the House of Representatives, the association we most think of when talking about the man, has yet to consider any reprimand or censure.

Yes, former members of Congress have been censured before - it doesn't happen often, but this is no ordinary congressman gone bad.

Will Congress distance themselves by officially acknowledging and formally rebuke him for his crimes?

Should they?

What does it matter? History will not change much.

If they do? Fine. If they don't? Fine.

He is a social pariah whichever choice they make.
 

OrphanSlug

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Should they?

I am not one that really buys into "formal censure acts" that are no more impacting than Congress passing "National Corvette Day." Even though we have had formal censures before all we are really talking about is strong disapproval of someone's actions. That is really it.

I'd rather Congress work on more pressing matters. Like our economy, or our spending habits, or using our military more often than not, or the VA still being very underfunded and dishonorable to those it should be serving, or dealing with energy policy, or actually doing their jobs with a vacant Supreme Court seat, etc.
 

Risky Thicket

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I am not one that really buys into "formal censure acts" that are no more impacting than Congress passing "National Corvette Day." Even though we have had formal censures before all we are really talking about is strong disapproval of someone's actions. That is really it.

I'd rather Congress work on more pressing matters. Like our economy, or our spending habits, or using our military more often than not, or the VA still being very underfunded and dishonorable to those it should be serving, or dealing with energy policy, or actually doing their jobs with a vacant Supreme Court seat, etc.

Absolutely! Being required to stand in the corner for an hour would be as effective as a Congressional Censure.

A gaggle of self-serving, thieving, duplicitous bastards formally censures one of their own for being one of their own. :roll:
 

Gaugingcatenate

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I am a Republican and am full on wanting those who break the law, especially those whose charge it is to be lawmakers themselves, be penalized. To the max especially in cases of young child molestation. Messages need be sent to all, both sides, that this is not permitted and it should be punished, no matter who one is. Prison, fines, censure... no statutes of limitation either.

Its the only way the system actually has a chance to work as it should.
 

Hawkeye10

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Does anyone know if house rules allow such a thing towards someone who is not a member of the House? I kinda think that the answer is no.
 
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