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Question for those in the UK

T

The Real McCoy

I have a question for our British friends. How they teach the American Revolution in schools over in the UK? I've always wondered this. What do they say about our struggle for independence and what do they say about George Washington and the rest of our founding fathers?
 

paulmarkj

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The Real McCoy said:
I have a question for our British friends. How they teach the American Revolution in schools over in the UK? I've always wondered this. What do they say about our struggle for independence and what do they say about George Washington and the rest of our founding fathers?
www.bbc.co.uk/history is a good web site. This site closely follows and supports the schools’ curriculum – teachers, parents and pupils use this site to support teaching and learning. So looking at this will give a good idea of what is taught in British schools.

Something to note is that for Americans, the American Revolution was a major event, perhaps the biggest event, of their history. For British people it is a minor historical event. It was yet another invasion/colonisation/revolution/war story. We learn about so many: the Crimean war, first world war, second world war, war of the roses, 100 years war, English civil war, Battle of Hasting, Napoleonic Wars, French revolution, Revolution of 1948, Vietnam War, Crusades, wars of Ancient Greece, wars of Ancient Rome, Boer war, 30 years war, 7 years war, opium wars in China, American Civil war, Russian revolution, peasants revolt, the glorious revolution, Jacobite rebellions, wars between Scotland and England, Ireland and England, Spain and England, the invasions, colonisation and wars of the of the Angles, Jutes, Goths, Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Vikings, Celts, Vandals, Saxons, Picts and Scots, and I’m sure there are more. Amongst all these, many of which had more impact on Britain, the American revolution doesn’t get much time.

My recollection of being taught the subject is this: British colonies worldwide; war with France that left the government without money; debate about which colonies to protect (a surprise to many Americans is that Parliament voted America the least important colony behind India and West Indies), taxation and lack of economic freedom from colonists, rebellion leading to outright revolt and war in America. The details of the war were not taught, though Boston tea part was. I don’t recall anything in particular being taught about the founding fathers except Washington, but even then just the basics. I would struggle to name any other founding father.
 

GarzaUK

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Yeah I was never taught about the American Revolution in school. I know just what I have learned by myself. The American Revolution isn't a big part in our history. In school I learned about:

The Norman Invasion and British life under Norman Rule
Renassiance and Reformation of the Church (Protestantism)
The Reign of the Tudor and Stuart Mornarchs
The English Civil War
The Jacobite Rebellion and the French invasion of Ireland led by the English abdicated catholic king of James IV
World War 1
World War 2
Cold War

And also a bit of Roman and Greek history thrown into the mix.
 

paulmarkj

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I should have said in my post that the long list of wars I wrote are not all taught to all pupils; schools can pick which ones they want to teach. Schools like to teach areas of history that are linked to their children. Where I live we did a lot of local Roman history and peasants revolt, because they are relevant to our area.
 

Plain old me

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I'm actually doing some part of the US history now, but not much on the revolution or George Washington, this is the syllabus for what I've gotta know...

Syllabus said:
The Making of the United States Constitution, 1787-1789
The strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation as had
become apparent by 1787; the case for and against strengthening the
Union in 1787; the Philadelphia Convention and its composition;
arguments of federalists and anti-federalists, North and South, large
and small states; the “Great Compromise”; the U.S. Constitution and
its ratification; the extent to which the U.S.A. was a democratic state
by 1789.
this is from http://www.aqa.org.uk/qual/pdf/AQA-5041-6041-W-SP-06.pdf
 

-Demosthenes-

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My recollection of being taught the subject is this: British colonies worldwide; war with France that left the government without money; debate about which colonies to protect (a surprise to many Americans is that Parliament voted America the least important colony behind India and West Indies), taxation and lack of economic freedom from colonists, rebellion leading to outright revolt and war in America. The details of the war were not taught, though Boston tea part was. I don’t recall anything in particular being taught about the founding fathers except Washington, but even then just the basics. I would struggle to name any other founding father.
Wow, I could make a huge list of Founding Fathers, "Founding Fathers" meaning well known people involved in the Revolution and creation of the US government, and probably most of the Delagates at the Philidelphia Convention, the more specific definition of the the term "Founding Fathers".

But I know little about English History.
 

mikeey

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Plain old me,that is a good ? my friend. could it be about black and white

i am not to sure,but i hope u manage 2 solve the problem.

let me know how u get on.

merry xmas to you

kind regards

mikeey
 
T

The Real McCoy

mikeey said:
Plain old me,that is a good ? my friend. could it be about black and white

i am not to sure,but i hope u manage 2 solve the problem.

let me know how u get on.

merry xmas to you

kind regards

mikeey
mikeey, has anyone ever told you that your posts can be quite difficult to understand?
 
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