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Our National Debt Now Affects Our Foreign Policy?

danarhea

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Ronald Reagan, who unequivically supported Taiwan, is turning in his grave today over the words of President Bush today. While saying that China and Taiwan should settle their differences peacefully, Bush said that he supported the One China Policy. If that isnt a signal to China that they can start turning the screws on Taiwan, and start negotiating from a position that reunification of Taiwan with the mainland is now supported by US policy, I dont know what is.

But how did it come to this? I have a good idea why. Think about our national debt, and how much of that debt is owned by China, and also think about our staggering trade deficit with China. Doesnt take a rocket scientist to realize that China has one hell of a bargaining chip with us now. Are they now in a position to influence our own foreign policy? Looks like they might be. The loss of soverignty begins with massive debt to another nation, which is why the British tried so hard after the American Revolution to gain control over our markets. That move failed, but China does have a pretty firm grip on our markets now, by virtue of our disgraceful national debt.

Article is here.
 

Kandahar

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I agree that our national debt is a major economic problem, but I don't think it affects our position toward Taiwan very much. Bush's stance on the issue is basically the same stance that other recent presidents have held: that the status quo should be maintained.
 

danarhea

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Kandahar said:
I agree that our national debt is a major economic problem, but I don't think it affects our position toward Taiwan very much. Bush's stance on the issue is basically the same stance that other recent presidents have held: that the status quo should be maintained.
Then why did he say that he now supports a one China policy. He is the first president to depart from the status quo, which was to maintain that Taiwan is independant from China.
 

Kandahar

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danarhea said:
Then why did he say that he now supports a one China policy. He is the first president to depart from the status quo, which was to maintain that Taiwan is independant from China.
That's not the status quo. Taiwan has never declared independence from China; every time they've come close, the United States (no matter who was president) has discouraged them from doing so, and for good reason.

Other presidents have also paid lip service to the idea of "One China," but it's mainly just a diplomatic maneuver and it doesn't mean that they want the PRC to control Taiwan.
 

danarhea

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Kandahar said:
That's not the status quo. Taiwan has never declared independence from China; every time they've come close, the United States (no matter who was president) has discouraged them from doing so, and for good reason.

Other presidents have also paid lip service to the idea of "One China," but it's mainly just a diplomatic maneuver and it doesn't mean that they want the PRC to control Taiwan.
I understand the context of what you are saying, but presidents have always treated Taiwan as its own entity, separate from China, in deed, if not in word. Reagan took a position that Chinese invasion of Taiwan would be an act of war. This is the first Time a president has ever made a statement that suggests that Taiwan and China could be reunified under Communist rule. What else could a one China policy mean? The Chinese, of course, are going to see that statement coming from a position of weakness, and not strength.
 
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