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Federalists, the ultimate non- partisans

4776

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Join a movement within the party of your choice. Federalism is as old as the nation (older actually). Its principals were the guiding principals of the Founders.
*Limited central government with enumerated powers
*Most powers reserved to the States and the People
Note the the word "party" doesn't even appear in the Constitution so associate wth whom you please.

Regardless of the party you wish to associate with work to find, support, and elect persons who believe in smaller, more fiscally responsible, limited central government.
 

CaptainCourtesy

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Join a movement within the party of your choice. Federalism is as old as the nation (older actually). Its principals were the guiding principals of the Founders.
*Limited central government with enumerated powers
*Most powers reserved to the States and the People
Note the the word "party" doesn't even appear in the Constitution so associate wth whom you please.

Regardless of the party you wish to associate with work to find, support, and elect persons who believe in smaller, more fiscally responsible, limited central government.

You do understand that, traditionally, Federalism and Federalists in the US referred to a strong central government, with power focused there, not with the states. What you are talking about is anti-Federalism.
 

ScottD

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The Federalists were pretty much the original democrats, and they opposed the democratic-republicans (who referred to themselves as republicans). The federalists supported a strong nationalist government, and they had members like George Washington and John Adams.
 

CaptainCourtesy

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The Federalists were pretty much the original democrats, and they opposed the democratic-republicans (who referred to themselves as republicans). The federalists supported a strong nationalist government, and they had members like George Washington and John Adams.

I would say that's pretty accurate. Hamilton was to the Federalists as Jefferson was to the Democratic-Republicans.
 

4776

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You are correct CaptainCourtesy I was incorrect in "(older actually)". The Federalists I refer to were the post Bill of Rights Federalists who embraced the Constitution as amended. The Bill of Rights largely resolved the issue between them and the "antis". Cept for the National Bank and others.

The principals they embraced are the ones which I admire and support.
 
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CaptainCourtesy

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You are correct CaptainCourtesy I was incorrect in "(older actually)". The Federalists I refer to were the post Bill of Rights Federalists who embraced the Constitution as amended. The Bill of Rights largely resolved the issue between them and the "antis". Cept for the National Bank and others.

The principals they embraced are the one to which I admire and support.

Even after the Bill of Rights, the Federalist were still the folks that wanted a strong central government, with power there rather than with the states. The anti-Federalists or Democratic-Republicans were the folks who wanted limited government, with a power base in the states. Jefferson was the classic anti-Federalsist, and his positions match those that you are describing.
 

4776

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Did Jefferson propose repeal of the Bill of Rights? Did he propose any amendments that altered the structure of the government or the relative status of the central government and the States? I don't think so.

He like all of the persons who were involved in the creation of our Nation as we know of it during their lifetimes retained that basic understanding of how the affairs of our government would be executed.

Our government as it developed for the first decades of its life (and until the 1820's) was dominated by the Federalists who maintained that basic "relative powers" status.

Please excuse my quibbling and imprecision of terminology. It is the principals (compromises though they were) to which I adhere
 

CaptainCourtesy

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Did Jefferson propose repeal of the Bill of Rights? Did he propose any amendments that altered the structure of the government or the relative status of the central government and the States? I don't think so.

He like all of the persons who were involved in the creation of our Nation as we know of it during their lifetimes retained that basic understanding of how the affairs of our government would be executed.

Our government as it developed for the first decades of its life (and until the 1820's) was dominated by the Federalists who maintained that basic "relative powers" status.

Please excuse my quibbling and imprecision of terminology. It is the principals (compromises though they were) to which I adhere

I consider many of my positions to be Federalist in nature, so I will quibble, also. The Federalists didn't even want the Bill of Rights to be included in the Constitution. They saw it as dangerous, believing that it would far too limiting; the government would not be able to create laws or regulate anything that wasn't included. It was the Anti-Federalists that wanted it there. Jefferson was one of these folks. The Bill of Rights was a compromise between the two groups.

And you are correct. Our country was dominated by Federalists in the first few decades. And they pushed for a strong central government. Hamilton, Marshall, Adams, these were the guys that were the most influential Federalists.
 

4776

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My imprecision of terminology knows no bounds. I am REALLY talking about "New" Federalism", found what was lurking deep in my (71 year old) brain in wikipedia:
Main article: New Federalism
Another movement calling itself "Federalism" appeared in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. New Federalism, which is characterized by a gradual return of power to the states, was initiated by President Ronald Reagan (1981-1989) with his "devolution revolution" in the early 1980s and lasted until 2001. Previously, the federal government had granted money to the states categorically, limiting the states to use this funding for specific programs. Reagan's administration, however, introduced a practice of giving block grants, freeing state governments to spend the money at their own discretion. New Federalism is sometimes called "states' rights", although its proponents usually eschew the latter term because of its associations with Jim Crow and segregation. Unlike the states' rights movement of the mid-20th century which centered around the civil rights movement, the modern federalist movement is concerned far more with expansive interpretations of the Commerce Clause, as in the areas of medical marijuana (Gonzales v. Raich), partial birth abortion (Gonzales v. Carhart), gun possession (United States v. Lopez), federal police powers (United States v. Morrison, which struck down portions of the Violence Against Women Act), or agriculture (Wickard v. Filburn). President Bill Clinton (1993-2001) embraced this philosophy, and President George W. Bush (2001-2009) appeared to support it at the time of his inauguration.

Helps???
 
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