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Congress Seats for Native American Tribes.

Irredentist

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It is an historical fact that Native American tribes have been politically, culturally, and economically marginalized within the United States. Many tribal communities are among the poorest to be found anywhere in the US, and even for those that have seen economic development, it has often come at the cost of serious environmental degradation due to resource exploitation.

In order to achieve economic independence, many native americans are forced to leave their communities, and to assimilate into white society. This has contributed to the ongoing loss of their cultural heritage, a process forcibly initiated by European colonizers.

But what, if anything, can be done to alleviate this damage? The Native American tribes currently hold the status of domestic dependent nations. They enjoy a certain degree of political autonomy, but are still subject to the powers of the United States government. And yet unlike the States, they are not given any direct political representation in Congress.

My belief is that the Native American Tribes must be given formal, direct representation in congress, in the form of seats in the Senate and/or the House of Representatives. In this manner, they will be able to elect their own representatives, able to advocate directly on their behalf. Only then will the First Nations, the original human inhabitants of America, have enough political influence to ensure that their people are no longer overlooked, marginalized, or exploited in their own land.
 

RaleBulgarian

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For a change of that significance, the Constitution would have to be amended. No small feat. Also, as part of the required changes to the Constitution, the native tribes would likely be forced to give up the sovereignty of their lands to the states the reservations are located in.

Tribal sovereignty in the United States - Wikipedia
 

AmNat

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It is an historical fact that Native American tribes have been politically, culturally, and economically marginalized within the United States. Many tribal communities are among the poorest to be found anywhere in the US, and even for those that have seen economic development, it has often come at the cost of serious environmental degradation due to resource exploitation.

In order to achieve economic independence, many native americans are forced to leave their communities, and to assimilate into white society. This has contributed to the ongoing loss of their cultural heritage, a process forcibly initiated by European colonizers.

But what, if anything, can be done to alleviate this damage? The Native American tribes currently hold the status of domestic dependent nations. They enjoy a certain degree of political autonomy, but are still subject to the powers of the United States government. And yet unlike the States, they are not given any direct political representation in Congress.

My belief is that the Native American Tribes must be given formal, direct representation in congress, in the form of seats in the Senate and/or the House of Representatives. In this manner, they will be able to elect their own representatives, able to advocate directly on their behalf. Only then will the First Nations, the original human inhabitants of America, have enough political influence to ensure that their people are no longer overlooked, marginalized, or exploited in their own land.

Indians are the only group of people allowed to have direct racial privileges (other minorities have to make due with indirect privileges). Why should they get more power?
 

Irredentist

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For a change of that significance, the Constitution would have to be amended. No small feat. Also, as part of the required changes to the Constitution, the native tribes would likely be forced to give up the sovereignty of their lands to the states the reservations are located in.

Tribal sovereignty in the United States - Wikipedia

They should receive the same level of autonomy and sovereignty that a US state does, and an equivalent level of representation.
 

RaleBulgarian

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They should receive the same level of autonomy and sovereignty that a US state does, and an equivalent level of representation.
I don’t disagree at all. I was just commenting on the challenges and complexity that would be involved in such a major change in legal relations between the federal government and Native American tribes.
 

Irredentist

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Indians are the only group of people allowed to have direct racial privileges (other minorities have to make due with indirect privileges). Why should they get more power?

Because in no significant way has any privilege granted to tribal members made up for the ongoing marginalization and degradation of native american territory, cultural identity, or their potential for economic prosperity.
 

AmNat

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Because in no significant way has any privilege granted to tribal members made up for the ongoing marginalization and degradation of native american territory, cultural identity, or their potential for economic prosperity.

The economic potential of Indians has (by any objective measure) drastically increased as a result of their contact with whites.

Again, why should they be given more power over the rest of us?
 

Irredentist

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I don’t disagree at all. I was just commenting on the challenges and complexity that would be involved in such a major change in legal relations between the federal government and Native American tribes.

The obstacles to a practical implementation of this plan are significant, that is true.
 

Irredentist

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The economic potential of Indians has (by any objective measure) drastically increased as a result of their contact with whites.

Again, why should they be given more power over the rest of us?

That largely depends on the tribe in question. Some are fortunate enough to be located in relatively prosperous, populated areas. Many others were pushed into undesirable locations by white settlers: wasteland regions with little to no potential for economic development.

This process was an intentional campaign on the part of the US government, to use their political power to dominate the native american tribes, and to push them to the margins of society.

It is time for the balance of political power to be shifted back. Those whose voices were silenced will now be heard.
 

RaleBulgarian

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The obstacles to a practical implementation of this plan are significant, that is true.
Native Americans have been treated horribly from the beginning of our country. Positive change is way, way overdo.

What I wonder, is what solution would be most advantageous to Native Americans and the state/federal governments? For Native Americans to have their own representation, what would they have to give up? My guess, as an ignorant layperson, is first they have to give up their sovereignty. How beneficial, really, would having a federal representative be? Think about D.C.. Certainly not the same, but you get the idea.
 

Irredentist

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Native Americans have been treated horribly from the beginning of our country. Positive change is way, way overdo.

What I wonder, is what solution would be most advantageous to Native Americans and the state/federal governments? For Native Americans to have their own representation, what would they have to give up? My guess, as an ignorant layperson, is first they have to give up their sovereignty. How beneficial, really, would having a federal representative be? Think about D.C.. Certainly not the same, but you get the idea.

It is true that one or two representatives more would not make much difference. But if every native american tribe sent representatives to congress, then collectively, they would have a significantly increased share of political power and influence.
 

mike2810

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Native Americans are represented. In Arizona for example the Navajo Nation is in Congressional District 1. Native Americans make up about 22% of the population in the District. Native Americans can vote in elections as well as within the tribe.

"Tribes possess all powers of self-government except those relinquished under treaty with the United States, those that Congress has expressly extinguished, and those that federal courts have ruled are subject to existing federal law or are inconsistent with overriding national policies. Tribes, therefore, possess the right to form their own governments; to make and enforce laws, both civil and criminal; to tax; to establish and determine membership (i.e., tribal citizenship); to license and regulate activities within their jurisdiction; to zone; and to exclude persons from tribal lands.

Limitations on inherent tribal powers of self-government are few, but do include the same limitations applicable to states, e.g., neither tribes nor states have the power to make war, engage in foreign relations, or print and issue currency."
Frequently Asked Questions | Indian Affairs
 

Middle_Ground

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I'm kind of confused by what you want.
You want native tribes in every state to be able to send a member to congress?
How would that work?
 

RetiredUSN

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It is an historical fact that Native American tribes have been politically, culturally, and economically marginalized within the United States. Many tribal communities are among the poorest to be found anywhere in the US, and even for those that have seen economic development, it has often come at the cost of serious environmental degradation due to resource exploitation.

In order to achieve economic independence, many native americans are forced to leave their communities, and to assimilate into white society. This has contributed to the ongoing loss of their cultural heritage, a process forcibly initiated by European colonizers.

But what, if anything, can be done to alleviate this damage? The Native American tribes currently hold the status of domestic dependent nations. They enjoy a certain degree of political autonomy, but are still subject to the powers of the United States government. And yet unlike the States, they are not given any direct political representation in Congress.

My belief is that the Native American Tribes must be given formal, direct representation in congress, in the form of seats in the Senate and/or the House of Representatives. In this manner, they will be able to elect their own representatives, able to advocate directly on their behalf. Only then will the First Nations, the original human inhabitants of America, have enough political influence to ensure that their people are no longer overlooked, marginalized, or exploited in their own land.

Get over it.
 

TheParser

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Yes, the country is ready for quotas based on their percentage of the population.

Then maybe the constant whining of certain folks will decrease.

Native Americans, for example, should have seats in the House and the Senate equivalent to their percentage of the American population.

This goes for every ethnicity in this strange nation.

Maybe we could finally get some respite from all this constant "race" talk and "abuse" talk and "hurt feelings" talk.


Enough already!
 

Irredentist

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Native Americans are represented. In Arizona for example the Navajo Nation is in Congressional District 1. Native Americans make up about 22% of the population in the District. Native Americans can vote in elections as well as within the tribe.

"Tribes possess all powers of self-government except those relinquished under treaty with the United States, those that Congress has expressly extinguished, and those that federal courts have ruled are subject to existing federal law or are inconsistent with overriding national policies. Tribes, therefore, possess the right to form their own governments; to make and enforce laws, both civil and criminal; to tax; to establish and determine membership (i.e., tribal citizenship); to license and regulate activities within their jurisdiction; to zone; and to exclude persons from tribal lands.

Limitations on inherent tribal powers of self-government are few, but do include the same limitations applicable to states, e.g., neither tribes nor states have the power to make war, engage in foreign relations, or print and issue currency."
Frequently Asked Questions | Indian Affairs

But the tribes do not have their own dedicated seats in congress, which means that their national political influence is extremely limited. That needs to change.
 

Irredentist

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I'm kind of confused by what you want.
You want native tribes in every state to be able to send a member to congress?
How would that work?

I want tribes to have their own seats in congress, just like states do.
 

Irredentist

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Yes, the country is ready for quotas based on their percentage of the population.

Then maybe the constant whining of certain folks will decrease.

Native Americans, for example, should have seats in the House and the Senate equivalent to their percentage of the American population.

This goes for every ethnicity in this strange nation.

Maybe we could finally get some respite from all this constant "race" talk and "abuse" talk and "hurt feelings" talk.


Enough already!

It is my belief that the people of the first nations should be given greater representation in congress than their population percentage might otherwise warrant, in an effort to rectify the severe imbalance of political power that has so far been to their disadvantage.
 

mike2810

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But the tribes do not have their own dedicated seats in congress, which means that their national political influence is extremely limited. That needs to change.

True, they do not. They are part of the US and the States in which the Tribe resides. They are free to run a person for Congress.

The Tribe can build casinos on tribal land even though a State may not have legal gambling. If the Tribe can do that, why not a private citizen on their land?
 

Irredentist

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True, they do not. They are part of the US and the States in which the Tribe resides. They are free to run a person for Congress.

The Tribe can build casinos on tribal land even though a State may not have legal gambling. If the Tribe can do that, why not a private citizen on their land?

Because tribes are not private citizens. They are local governments, who have the authority to pass laws regarding economic activity which occurs under their jurisdiction, just like a US state does.
 

mike2810

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Because tribes are not private citizens. They are local governments, who have the authority to pass laws regarding economic activity which occurs under their jurisdiction, just like a US state does.

People within the tribe are private citizens. Citizens of the tribe and of the US. For the US part they have representation through the Senators and Congressional District representative.

We will agree to disagree on how much representation do the native Americans need.
 

RaleBulgarian

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It is true that one or two representatives more would not make much difference. But if every native american tribe sent representatives to congress, then collectively, they would have a significantly increased share of political power and influence.
There are about 1.5 million Native Americans currently living on reservations throughout the United States. How would districts be drawn? How many reps would they rate for the relatively small population? What about senators?
 

Bullseye

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For a change of that significance, the Constitution would have to be amended. No small feat. Also, as part of the required changes to the Constitution, the native tribes would likely be forced to give up the sovereignty of their lands to the states the reservations are located in.

Tribal sovereignty in the United States - Wikipedia

Tribal sovereignty is a strange critter. Although technically a sovereign state residents still have US Citizenship. Local cops have no jurisdiction on the reservations. And they have Casinos!
 

RaleBulgarian

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Tribal sovereignty is a strange critter. Although technically a sovereign state residents still have US Citizenship. Local cops have no jurisdiction on the reservations. And they have Casinos!
That’s something I have wondered about. Do the tribes that profit from their casinos spread the wealth throughout their community? And if not, why not?
 
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