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Are All Bio-Fuels Sources Equal?

CaliNORML

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Are all bio fuels the same?

Wheat, corn, sugar cane, soybeans, and Hemp. All of these plants are being studied as possible sources of bio-fuels and energy supplies for America. Yet out of all of these is one more usefull than the others in the production of usefull energy sources?

Yes, Hemp. Hemp is a different "animal" if you will in the jungle of this energy debate. Bio-Energy Hemp is a clean source of energy and the process to create such a program are available today.

The main point I see happening is that the arguements against Bio-Energy are always centered around wheat, corn, and soybeans.

These plants DO cost more to process, and they DO produce less of a useable energy source, and they DO have a high price of production. However they are not Hemp.

The one biggest debate is Biomass. Here is Hemp in this Biomass debate.

For full text CLICK HERE
Biomass

UP to 90 per cent of the fossil fuels we use today could and should be replaced by biomass fuels. Using a process called pyrolisis, plant material can be converted into methanol. In order to produce energy most efficiently from biomass it is necessary to select a plant which grows quickly and easily. Cannabis is such a plant.


Of all suitable biomass species, cannabis is the most prolific: it is a low-moisture content, woody plant which can be grown in virtually all climatic conditions. Hemp is an ideal example of a plant which can be converted into
methane, methanol or petrol at a fraction of the cost of coal, oil or nuclear energy.


Methanol can be refined into gasoline, kerosene-paraffin jet fuel and other fuel-oils, as well as other substances including paints and varnishes. Byproducts of the biomass process can be used in tars, asphalt and charcoal. When all these substances are burned, they produce carbon dioxide and water, and none of the pollutants of petroleum-based fuels.

Hemp seeds are richer in certain properties than other grains, making them perferctly suited to produce oils.

Full article CLICK HERE

Corn, tree pulp and hemp are sources for clean-burning alcohol, methanol and methane gas. These 'biofuels' contain no sulfur, the pollutant that causes acid rain. Growing the fuel also produces oxygen, to balance the oxygen consumed during combustion. Engines stay cleaner and the air remains much cleaner.

Hemp may be the most profitable and productive fuel crop that can be grown in many areas of America. Hemp can produce about 1000 gallons of methanol per acre, four times as much as can be produced from trees. Fuel can be produced locally, reducing transportation costs. The production process, called biomass conversion, is safe and clean. It would create a domestic fuel industry, freeing us from Middle East oil dependency, providing jobs and keeping our currency at home.

Hemp fuel needs no taxpayer subsidies, as oil receives. The Department of Energy estimated that fuel could be produced from hemp for about 36 cents per gallon. In New South Wales, Australia the Minister of Energy told the parliament they should consider burning confiscated hemp to produce electricity. "It burns at extremely high temperature, produces a lot of power and is cheaper (and much cleaner) to burn than coal."

Hemp was the subject of a 1991 conference held in Wisconsin. One speaker pointed out our government spends $26 billion each year to pay farmers not to cultivate their land. Instead of this waste of taxpayer money, farmers could grow hemp or other fuel crops. This could completely end our dependence on foreign oil.

Here are other uses for hemp to help us wean this country off foriegn oil.

For full article CLICK HERE

Michael Klug introduced his firm (Okomarkt, Germany), as the German representative of Chenevotte Habitate, the French manufacturer of ISOCHANVRE products, and discussed potential applications of these materials. Based on petrified shives, they are now increasingly used for the insulation of walls or, mixed with lime, as a substitute for plaster or concrete (see also: JIHA 1(2), p.50).
One particular example of the potential uses of hemp as an energy source, i.e. as a boiler fuel, was discussed by Hans-Bernhard von Buttlar (Gesamthochschule Kassel, Germany). Their cultivation tests indicated that crop combinations of hemp and winter rye can, depending on plant density and rate of fertilization, achieve combined annual dry matter yields of up to 24 tons p.a., equivalent to approximately 10,000 liters of fuel oil. Combustion properties of hemp were considered favorable because of its high ash melting point. The plant's mineral content could be lowered further by wet pressing, reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides and improving ash melting. As for other renewables, large-scale use of hemp as a boiler fuel cannot currently compete economically with fossil fuels, but offers the advantage of a CO2-neutral fuel supply.
The next four talks were devoted to the properties of, and applications for, the other major resource from hemp: seeds and oil.

Roland Theimer (Bergische Universitat, Germany) reported test results for the fatty acid (FA) spectra found in various hemp oils. They confirm that hemp oils contain high proportions of essential poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Theimer found that the major poly-unsaturated FA present in hemp oil, i.e. linoleic, linolenic, and oleic acids, typically account for 55%, 15%, and 10% of the total fatty acid content, respectively. Particularly significant is the high content of linolenic acid which is essential for human nutrition, but under-represented in most vegetable oils and animal fats. In addition, hemp oil also contains smaller percentages of shorter (C14:0) fatty acids which may account for some of its useful properties, e.g. as detergent (see below). Since FA composition was found to vary widely between hemp varieties, hemp breeders should also strive to optimize FA composition depending on specific product requirements.

Hemp should be considered on its unique properties alone, not as just another "plant." America may need to take a good long look at how it is different from the other sources of this energy, then debate the Bio-fuel applications here in America to foriegn oil dependency we now face.


KMS
 

kcasper

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I'm trying not to be too negative, but hemp has a legality problem that makes your argument almost pointless in the USA. I mean there are only 6 or 7 states that will allow it to be grown for research and no other purposes and it is illegal otherwise, everywhere else in the US.

For me, at least, it isn't worth debating a far off benefit that probably won't happen in the US due to too many US senators who wrongly believe legalizing hemp will hurt the war on drugs. We have a serious bridge to gap first.
 

CaliNORML

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This type of production is feasible, and the ban has been re-defined.

A hearing on Bill AB 1147, the Industrial Hemp Bill, is scheduled for April 27, 2006 before the California Assembly Agriculture Committee, this act to amend Section 11018 of, and to add Section 11018.5 to, the Health and Safety Code, relating to industrial hemp.

Chief sponsor of the Congressional Bill in 2005 was Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX), he along with several co-sponsors introduced this bill to Congress. Passed by Congressional approval the bill defined industrial hemp and assigned authority over it to the states. States can now regulate the growing and processing of industrial hemp. California now is trying to enact such laws.

This stems from the 9th circuit court ruling in 2004 stating that the DEA did not have the authority to regulate Hemp as they had been doing since the 1970 Controlled Substances Act took effect. Soon after a Federal Bill was passed by Congress in 2005, legislation was enacted removing restrictions on the cultivation of non-psychoactive industrial hemp in many states such as Hawaii, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, and West Virginia have enacted such laws for the first time since the federal government outlawed hemp farming in the United States.

The United States Court of Appeals Ninth Circuit has ruled
in Hemp Industries v. Drug Enforcement Administration that the
Controlled Substances Act of 1970 explicitly excludes
non-psychoactive hemp from the definition of marijuana, and the
federal government has declined to appeal that decision.

Thats 8 states growing it now, California and Oregon will bve next followed by Washington State I am sure.

The gap has been bridged, so funny more people do not know about it, especially when it could save us so much money.

KMS
 
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CaliNORML

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Yes I am still doing this here are some figure released from Canada as to the savings of Hemp fuel and it upcoming programs.

"Biodiesel fuel cuts emissions at an exponential rate. A 20 per cent blend of biodiesel reduces harmful emissions by 50 per cent. Biodiesel also means more money will stay in Manitoba. At current gasoline prices, the province’s ethanol strategy will keep $65 million in the province."

"The biodiesel strategy has potential to keep another $25 million in Manitoba, if five per cent of diesel fuel imports are displaced. But the dollars could easily reach 10 times that."

"About 70 per cent of the cost of biodiesel is the foodstock, not labour. Plus, an ethanol plant costs a minimum $60-$70 million, versus $1-$2 million for a biodiesel plant.

Also, local communities planning to build biodiesel plants have a built-in market.

Urban centres and rural municipalities have municipal road equipment (snow plows, graders, etc.), emergency vehicles, and school division bus fleets that run on diesel fuel.

Then there are local farm customers with tractors and combines to run, and trucking firms with their big rigs. Winnipeg is headquarters to 13 major trucking companies. "

"Each of the biodiesel plants will need about 10 full-time staff, operating three shifts, adding very welcome employment in rural regions. Jobs will pay relatively decent wages of $12-$16 per hour. Plants will also add trucking jobs each to deliver their biofuel. Why is Manitoba so far out in front of the other provinces on biodiesel?"

"In total, investors have put up $280,000.

A provincial program where individual rural investors can reap a tax credit of 30 per cent, is expected to raise another $400,000. Other financing includes a $250,000 capital grant from the province, once Bio-Blends completes its new building (the province has put up $1.5 million to support small and medium size bio-diesel projects in Manitoba), and a $550,000 loan with the province.

Communities investing in the biodiesel plants is a no-brainer, Lee said.

Manitoba burns 850 million litres of diesel fuel a year. Replacing 10 per cent of that purchase with biodiesel would use up more canola than Manitoba grows.

Plus, there’s great demand outside the province. Europe has started calling Manitoba, looking to buy biofuel.

“We could end up shipping product there by tanker. The European market is just starving for biodiesel,” Lee said."

Why are we here in America so behind this economic boom?

KMS
 

UtahBill

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Despite what some may say, we in the USA and Canada do not have the land and water and climate combinations to grow enough crops for both food and fuel, especially if we are to continue exporting so much food to other countries. Granted, we send to landfills a lot of grass clippings and tree trimmings that could be used to make methanol, but how much fuel will we use to get the waste greenery to the processing plant? Electric company tree trimmers probably would be a good source of feed stock, as they have to haul it somewhere anyway.
Brazil is probably the one country to go to for answers about biomass fuels, and they have an edge on us. Their climate and water supply is more suited to the production of alcohol based fuels than ours, for sure, and they have a lot more land per vehicle and per person so they can grow plenty of food and fuel crops. They use just about all of their sugar cane crop waste products making alcohol and cattle feed out of it.
One thing to consider, a tree that is burned in a furnace, or cut up and made into biofuel will release the same amount of CO2 as if it just died and fell down and rotted away in the forest. It is going to release its CO2 anyway, might as well get some use out of it as a fuel.
 

stsburns

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I can only imagine going to McDonnalds and order "I would also like 20 Gallons of 'Mc Fuel' please"


What you take away from one side, will have to be taken away from another, its called balance-stsburns AKA DaBurnz
 

CaliNORML

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Ok once again it is shown that there is a comparison of Hemp to other bio mass products.

Reading the studies all that is proven untrue, Hemp was produced in all 50 US states. Known as the best in the world.

That the land is not not there is disproven in my own California County, only 5/3rds of which are used, over 1 million acres here alone is useable. This land continues 500 miles to the Grapevine going into the Los Angels Basin.

"Grass clippings" and "Trees" are not Hemp, and do not produce the same results when processed into fuel, or used as a fuel source.

This fact was why I started this thread, please stop the comparison, there is no other bio-fuel product coming as close to Hemps ability to outshine the others in this area.

KMS
 
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