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A Topic For Discussion.

Torus34

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Here in the United States of America, we are witnessing the evolution of some of our states into 'red' or 'blue' communities. There is some indication, particularly in how 'reds' respond to 'blues' and, of course, vice versa, of a trend toward a state monoculture.

And so the question.

At what point can a specific state no longer be considered as a full member of the republic?

Or, as children ask on long drives, "Are we there yet?"

Regards, stay safe 'n well 'n remember the Big 5.
 

Artymoon

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Here in the United States of America, we are witnessing the evolution of some of our states into 'red' or 'blue' communities. There is some indication, particularly in how 'reds' respond to 'blues' and, of course, vice versa, of a trend toward a state monoculture.

And so the question.

At what point can a specific state no longer be considered as a full member of the republic?

Or, as children ask on long drives, "Are we there yet?"

Regards, stay safe 'n well 'n remember the Big 5.
So if one state is entirely red or entirely blue, are they not considered part of the republic? Sorry, not following your line of thought.
 

Mycroft

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Here in the United States of America, we are witnessing the evolution of some of our states into 'red' or 'blue' communities. There is some indication, particularly in how 'reds' respond to 'blues' and, of course, vice versa, of a trend toward a state monoculture.

And so the question.

At what point can a specific state no longer be considered as a full member of the republic?

Or, as children ask on long drives, "Are we there yet?"

Regards, stay safe 'n well 'n remember the Big 5.
I don't understand your question.

What makes you think that ANY state might, at some point, be considered not a full member of the republic?
 

Craig234

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A 100% Democratic state is a full member of the Republic. So is a 100% Republican state in theory, but if Republican radicalizes to mean seditionist and traitorous and enemy of our democracy, that's why they're de-legitimized, not for being Republican when Republican isn't that radicalized.
 

Bok_Tukalo

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It is not at the state level. It is urban and rural. Texas is a red state. Houston, San Antonio, Austin, and the Dallas-Ft Worth metroplexes, the points on the Texas Triangle which are responsible for 77% of our state GDP, are decidedly blue.
 

Torus34

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So if one state is entirely red or entirely blue, are they not considered part of the republic? Sorry, not following your line of thought.

Hi, Artymoon!

What I'm trying to say is that the US is, technically and functionally, a republic of states. It was conceived as such in the Constitution. For a republic to function, the several states must be willing to assist in that functionality. Can a state develop a culture which interferes with its duties to the republic? Are some of our states beginning to move toward that point?

In short, is the republic in danger of functional dissolution?

Regards, stay safe 'n well 'n remember the Big 5.
 

Craig234

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In short, is the republic in danger of functional dissolution?

Things that prevent that include the government's uniform governing, that tax laws, agencies and such are standard across states. Unlike China, which treats 'minority states' as second-class citizens (OK, third-class, since normal citizens are second-class).
 

Artymoon

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Hi, Artymoon!

What I'm trying to say is that the US is, technically and functionally, a republic of states. It was conceived as such in the Constitution. For a republic to function, the several states must be willing to assist in that functionality. Can a state develop a culture which interferes with its duties to the republic? Are some of our states beginning to move toward that point?

In short, is the republic in danger of functional dissolution?

Regards, stay safe 'n well 'n remember the Big 5.
Thanks for clarification. Certainly, areas within a state can develop cultures red and blue but unless those permeate throughout the state to say alter their state constitutions and not recognize the Federal Gov't as legitimate then we have a problem. I don't believe that is likely and don't feel the republic is in danger of dissolution.
 

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The states that harbor illegal aliens, defund police and treat criminals like victims are enemies of the republic and need to be treated accordingly
 

RaleBulgarian

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At what point can a specific state no longer be considered as a full member of the republic?
Outside of a constitutional amendment granting states the right to secede (not going to happen), never.
 

BirdinHand

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Here in the United States of America, we are witnessing the evolution of some of our states into 'red' or 'blue' communities. There is some indication, particularly in how 'reds' respond to 'blues' and, of course, vice versa, of a trend toward a state monoculture.

And so the question.

At what point can a specific state no longer be considered as a full member of the republic?

Or, as children ask on long drives, "Are we there yet?"

Regards, stay safe 'n well 'n remember the Big 5.
No state is completely blue or red.
 

Torus34

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No state is completely blue or red.

Hi, BirdinHand!

As far as the people -- the voters -- within a given state, this is true. My concern was more with the people, the representatives, that a state sends to the Federal Congress. If those representatives are all from the same party, and if their votes are always in concert with their party, is that state fulfilling it's function as envisioned by the framers of the Constitution?

Regards, stay safe 'n well.
 

BirdinHand

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Hi, BirdinHand!

As far as the people -- the voters -- within a given state, this is true. My concern was more with the people, the representatives, that a state sends to the Federal Congress. If those representatives are all from the same party, and if their votes are always in concert with their party, is that state fulfilling it's function as envisioned by the framers of the Constitution?

Regards, stay safe 'n well.
Yes.

If each district elects them - then they are representing the majority of voters from that district.

Do you question the foundation of what this country was built upon typically?
 

Torus34

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Yes.

If each district elects them - then they are representing the majority of voters from that district.

Do you question the foundation of what this country was built upon typically?

Hi, again.

Your question's too broad. There are things which I question. It's not an 'all or nothing' situation.

I question whether a representative who votes the party line without fail is representing the voters -- or his/her party.

Regards, best wishes to you and yours.
 

Mycroft

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Hi, Artymoon!

What I'm trying to say is that the US is, technically and functionally, a republic of states. It was conceived as such in the Constitution. For a republic to function, the several states must be willing to assist in that functionality. Can a state develop a culture which interferes with its duties to the republic? Are some of our states beginning to move toward that point?

In short, is the republic in danger of functional dissolution?

Regards, stay safe 'n well 'n remember the Big 5.
The "republic" will never be in danger of functional dissolution.

Keep in mind that the states essentially govern themselves. The federal government governs overall issues. If a particular state turns totally red or blue, that state cannot interfere in the governance at the federal level. Congress will still write laws. Presidents will still sign or veto laws and the executive branch will still carry out the laws.

The republic goes on.
 
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