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13% of students "chronically absent"

soot

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LOL

That article is funny.

Black, Latino, and Native American students don't actually even bother going to school, but it's also a problem that they're not provided with opportunities for "advanced classwork".

Oh, and we're not teaching them enough while they're incarcerated for the crimes that they were committing when they were, ostensibly, not attending the schools they should be going to.

And even though African American students are suspended and otherwise disciplined in school at a rate far exceeding their white counterparts, that discipline does no good and they still cut school and wind up in jail.
 

HonestJoe

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How is this my problem again? Or for that matter a problem period?
Well for the purely self-centred, how about poor education leading too criminality and dependency on state support which will directly affect your taxes and the quality of society you live in?
 

OrphanSlug

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How do we expect public education to succeed if students don't even show up?

Civil rights data deluge - POLITICO

It is much bigger than your question, and frankly because of how the government looks at education opens up a risk of further degrade of education to the lowest common denominator. But that is yet to be seen.

Being "chronically absent" can be for any number of reasons but the assumption from the article based on alternate statistics suggests minorities falling out of the mix because of education standard and/or some cultural & social choice made. Either way the natural response from the government is to evaluate how students progress through the system by applied standards in an effort to ensure minorities stay engaged longer by trend.

Turns out that is exactly what the named "Every Student Succeeds Act" does. It uses and expands language from the No Child Left Behind act so that various state education departments intervene in the lowest 5% performing schools. That is after the fact, just as No Child Left Behind handled things. Post the failure. The rest of the bill is throwing money at the problem. The act expands new grants to districts serving "low income students," federal grants for textbooks and library books to those identified problem schools, more grants for preschool efforts, and expands scholarships for low-income college students.

What the bill does not do directly is address why there is disparity across the demographic spectrum in staying in school. The bill does not go into those school districts and evaluate why those students specifically end up chronically absent.
 

Fiddytree

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How do we expect public education to succeed if students don't even show up?

Civil rights data deluge - POLITICO

Let's examine your logic here a bit more carefully.

13% of students are absent. How can we expect education to succeed. The problem here is that that overlooks that 87% of students are fairly consistent in attending school, and, according to you, are still finding the education system to not be succeeding. One could have qualms about the last claim (I, myself, do not believe the American education system is in a crisis to warrant such implications), but that's the import of your statement if you think about it.

Now here's the thing about absenteeism: it means a lot of different things. Some of it are deep community or economic issues that the school, alone, cannot address. It could ameliorate the issues, but it would be incredibly difficult to ask much more. Other times there's consequences for school policies and/or staff practices that are inappropriate or outmoded. And yes, independent of both of those things, there's also other students that are simply truant for the sake of being truant and doing something else.

Families from lower socio-economic backgrounds often have family situations that pit a family's security and well-being against a kid going to school that day (which our society has also argued is a basic component of security and well-being). I've known students who had to work in order for their family to have food on the table, for other family members to be taken care of, and so on. It's a massive problem, but that doesn't exactly lay the blame on the student. There's also parents out there that aren't doing their job in getting their kids to school. I have, and others too, have probably seen both during their time working with children and youth.

Furthermore, the data also included students with disabilities. Students with disabilities do represent a grouping of students with more absenteeism, however, there a number of reasons for that. One is the consequence of school policies and procedures with regard to discipline that often clash with a student's disability and the reluctance to find what we call a "manifestation determination,"(i.e. the behavior that was penalized was as a result of the student's disability), create meaningful behavioral plans, and act on them. This carries for a large number of students with disabilities, but becomes especially huge with students with emotional and behavioral disabilities or difficulties. Some of this, for instance, may be because of an issue with a student's disability that needs to be addressed, because, perhaps their anxiety is as such that they can't get out of the bedroom, no matter how hard mom or dad try. I've also helped students try to use public transportation consistently because their anxiety would trigger as soon as the school bus shows up and they just wander the community or go back home.
 
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Erod

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If the parents don't give a crap, the kids won't give a crap.

This isn't rocket surgery.
 

VanceMack

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This problem has been brewing for a few decades. Once upon a time...you missed 5 classes a semester you failed. Then it was 9. Now...they cant fail you for missing classes and your grades are considered the students 'property'. It used to be that homework was due the next day and long term reports and projects were due on their due date. Now...as long as you get them in before the end of the semester you get full credit and by the end of the school year you still get credit for the work. mind you...the teachers are just checking boxes at that point and there is no real way to grade papers for accuracy. More and more kids are advancing and graduating that shouldnt be and those people are going to college. They are failing entrance exams so they are having to take a year of non-credit remedial classes just to learn how to write papers, formulate sentences, critically think, etc.

This really isnt on the schools...its on the parents that demanded their precious little dears not be held accountable.
 

PirateMk1

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Well for the purely self-centred, how about poor education leading too criminality and dependency on state support which will directly affect your taxes and the quality of society you live in?

Taxes I can take care of I am a business owner and taxes in the us are focused toward that. As far criminals if they screw with me they get hurt, badly if I have my way. So again how is this my problem?
 

HonestJoe

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Taxes I can take care of I am a business owner and taxes in the us are focused toward that. As far criminals if they screw with me they get hurt, badly if I have my way. So again how is this my problem?
Fair enough, you’ll be fine and screw everyone else eh? Hope your attitude bites you on the ass one day!
 

PirateMk1

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Fair enough, you’ll be fine and screw everyone else eh? Hope your attitude bites you on the ass one day!


Don't you know? Its the attitude of the day, everyone for themselves and **** everyone else. The attitude is especially prevalent in the "progressive movement." Works for me, I float with the wind.
 

Erod

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The thing is, you can't run and hide at ACT or SAT time. And the gap between educational level is brought to full light.

There is actually a movement declaring the ACT and SAT racist.
 

Celebrity

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It is much bigger than your question, and frankly because of how the government looks at education opens up a risk of further degrade of education to the lowest common denominator. But that is yet to be seen.

Being "chronically absent" can be for any number of reasons but the assumption from the article based on alternate statistics suggests minorities falling out of the mix because of education standard and/or some cultural & social choice made. Either way the natural response from the government is to evaluate how students progress through the system by applied standards in an effort to ensure minorities stay engaged longer by trend.

Turns out that is exactly what the named "Every Student Succeeds Act" does. It uses and expands language from the No Child Left Behind act so that various state education departments intervene in the lowest 5% performing schools. That is after the fact, just as No Child Left Behind handled things. Post the failure. The rest of the bill is throwing money at the problem. The act expands new grants to districts serving "low income students," federal grants for textbooks and library books to those identified problem schools, more grants for preschool efforts, and expands scholarships for low-income college students.

What the bill does not do directly is address why there is disparity across the demographic spectrum in staying in school. The bill does not go into those school districts and evaluate why those students specifically end up chronically absent.

World Star Hip Hop's vine compilation has been known to feature videos uploaded by students harassing teachers. There are videos of teachers and students attacking one another as well as videos of teachers doing dance moves in the classroom. By far the most common videos where an altercation takes place is student on student violence, which may happen outside of the classroom on school grounds. This is all anecdotal, however it is not an isolated incident, and it is well documented.

Too much oversight can be just as bad as standardized testing. When teachers in poor elementary schools have to take money out of pocket to pay for school supplies, that's a good indication that education needs more funding.
 

nota bene

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This problem has been brewing for a few decades. Once upon a time...you missed 5 classes a semester you failed. Then it was 9. Now...they cant fail you for missing classes and your grades are considered the students 'property'. It used to be that homework was due the next day and long term reports and projects were due on their due date. Now...as long as you get them in before the end of the semester you get full credit and by the end of the school year you still get credit for the work. mind you...the teachers are just checking boxes at that point and there is no real way to grade papers for accuracy. More and more kids are advancing and graduating that shouldnt be and those people are going to college. They are failing entrance exams so they are having to take a year of non-credit remedial classes just to learn how to write papers, formulate sentences, critically think, etc.

This really isnt on the schools...its on the parents that demanded their precious little dears not be held accountable.

My community's school system has fail-safes for students who are at-risk, including accommodations for young mothers and an "accelerated" curriculum that enables a student to finish high school in a couple of months (sometimes faster, depending).

Not all students have parents who care, but there are many parents who care very much while their kids just don't. You can lead that young horse to water....
 

Groogrux

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The thing is, you can't run and hide at ACT or SAT time. And the gap between educational level is brought to full light.

There is actually a movement declaring the ACT and SAT racist.

So pathetic. Just another attempt at trying to justify poor parenting and bad decisions.
 

Celebrity

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My community's school system has fail-safes for students who are at-risk, including accommodations for young mothers and an "accelerated" curriculum that enables a student to finish high school in a couple of months (sometimes faster, depending).

Not all students have parents who care, but there are many parents who care very much while their kids just don't. You can lead that young horse to water....

My state had the lowest student-teacher ratios in the country, according to a 2014 study by the NEA. If 13% don't show up, that might be one student with a disability. For classes with two or more students who regularly don't show up, a ratio of 16:1 or greater would be representative, and this ratio is not uncommon in elementary or high school. In fact this is the US average.

If growing class sizes and dropping out are both trends, it would appear that it's not just the students who are at risk but the education system itself. That's a little bit disappointing for taxpayers who pay half a trillion dollars on public elementary and secondary education (based on data from as recent as 2010).

NEA - Rankings of the States 2013 and Estimates of School Statistics 2014
 
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Celebrity

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So pathetic. Just another attempt at trying to justify poor parenting and bad decisions.

It's not really a matter of parenting for children who cannot answer questions about subject matter which exists only outside of their culture or socioeconomic background. Standardized testing is fundamentally flawed - like the IQ test, it attempts to broadly address intelligence.
 

Erod

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It's not really a matter of parenting for children who cannot answer questions about subject matter which exists only outside of their culture or socioeconomic background. Standardized testing is fundamentally flawed - like the IQ test, it attempts to broadly address intelligence.

Whose "cultural or socioeconomic background" does Calculus or Physics nestle into comfortably?

You either did the work, learned the information, and can demonstrate it.......or you can't.
 

Celebrity

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Whose "cultural or socioeconomic background" does Calculus or Physics nestle into comfortably?

You either did the work, learned the information, and can demonstrate it.......or you can't.

I did it because it fits into my cultural and socioeconomic means. :cool:
 

VanceMack

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My community's school system has fail-safes for students who are at-risk, including accommodations for young mothers and an "accelerated" curriculum that enables a student to finish high school in a couple of months (sometimes faster, depending).

Not all students have parents who care, but there are many parents who care very much while their kids just don't. You can lead that young horse to water....
Handing someone a diploma is meaningless if they dont actually learn. A diploma checks a box...but it doesnt prepare them for careers or college. And of COURSE there are MANY parents that care. There are just enough that dont that it has caused significant problems in the education system.
 

justabubba

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Let's examine your logic here a bit more carefully.

13% of students are absent. How can we expect education to succeed. The problem here is that that overlooks that 87% of students are fairly consistent in attending school, and, according to you, are still finding the education system to not be succeeding. One could have qualms about the last claim (I, myself, do not believe the American education system is in a crisis to warrant such implications), but that's the import of your statement if you think about it.

Now here's the thing about absenteeism: it means a lot of different things. Some of it are deep community or economic issues that the school, alone, cannot address. It could ameliorate the issues, but it would be incredibly difficult to ask much more. Other times there's consequences for school policies and/or staff practices that are inappropriate or outmoded. And yes, independent of both of those things, there's also other students that are simply truant for the sake of being truant and doing something else.

Families from lower socio-economic backgrounds often have family situations that pit a family's security and well-being against a kid going to school that day (which our society has also argued is a basic component of security and well-being). I've known students who had to work in order for their family to have food on the table, for other family members to be taken care of, and so on. It's a massive problem, but that doesn't exactly lay the blame on the student. There's also parents out there that aren't doing their job in getting their kids to school. I have, and others too, have probably seen both during their time working with children and youth.

Furthermore, the data also included students with disabilities. Students with disabilities do represent a grouping of students with more absenteeism, however, there a number of reasons for that. One is the consequence of school policies and procedures with regard to discipline that often clash with a student's disability and the reluctance to find what we call a "manifestation determination,"(i.e. the behavior that was penalized was as a result of the student's disability), create meaningful behavioral plans, and act on them. This carries for a large number of students with disabilities, but becomes especially huge with students with emotional and behavioral disabilities or difficulties. Some of this, for instance, may be because of an issue with a student's disability that needs to be addressed, because, perhaps their anxiety is as such that they can't get out of the bedroom, no matter how hard mom or dad try. I've also helped students try to use public transportation consistently because their anxiety would trigger as soon as the school bus shows up and they just wander the community or go back home.
i did not comprehend what you were saying here:
One is the consequence of school policies and procedures with regard to discipline that often clash with a student's disability and the reluctance to find what we call a "manifestation determination,"(i.e. the behavior that was penalized was as a result of the student's disability), create meaningful behavioral plans, and act on them.
would you please share examples of manifestation determination
 

Groogrux

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I did it because it fits into my cultural and socioeconomic means. :cool:

Yes, because your parents valued education. Any student that attends school regularly, values education and does what is required of them to achieve responsible grades will have no problem with the ACTs or SATs.
 
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