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Would you let your children become cheerleaders? (1 Viewer)

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So would you let them? I think it is a great activity for building teamwork and athletic skill.
 
If they wanted to, sure. They never had the slightest interesti.
 
So would you let them? I think it is a great activity for building teamwork and athletic skill.

Our daughter showed no interest. But others should allow their daughters to do so... I was amazed how many strippers were cheerleaders in high school... last thing we need in trying times like these is a pole dancer shortage!!!! :peace
 


So would you let them? I think it is a great activity for building teamwork and athletic skill.


They both prefer soccer. Reminds me of Bush the moron when he was in college. Sure I would let them if they were so inclined.
 


So would you let them? I think it is a great activity for building teamwork and athletic skill.


Let not the hateful knuckle dragging Neanderthals get you down. Cheerleading is a good wholesome team sport.
 
My kids are grown but I would not have minded. I am a free range parent, I usually let my kids do what they wanted to do, though sometimes choosing something that I did not like resulted in them needing to sit through a lecture. We did have a rule that they needed to be involved in at least one time consuming extracurricular, which one was not happy about. She chose bowling because it was the least offensive.
 
Would you let your children become cheerleaders?

sure, if they want to. i probably won't attend every sportsball game that the child cheers at, though, because i can only take so much sportsball. as for concussionball, though, no. i will work to prevent that in a Machiavellian way.
 
My boys are big in to soccer, and the older of the two basketball as well, but if either of them ever got the bug up his ass to become a cheerleader I wouldn't have any objection.

I have a lot of friends who have girls in the eight to twelve year old range who are involved in competitive cheer-leading and from what little I've seen of it (on Facebook and such) I don't think there's anything kids get from more "traditional' team sports that they wouldn't get from cheerleading.

The commitment, dedication, hard work, camaraderie, and all the other values that participation in organized athletics impart on a growing kid, all seem to be there with cheerleading.
 
If they were old enough (17+), kept up with their schoolwork AND I was assured by their cheerleading trainers that they would have a safe, padded training area and that they would not be subjected to standing on each others' shoulders hoping someone's skull isn't smashed in the inevitable pileup as they fall.

Actually, it's danged dangerous so it's nothing I'd be pushing my kids to do. They can play soccer, tennis, softball, any number of great athletic sports that don't involve potentially dropping from 25 feet in the air onto their heads.
 
If they were old enough (17+), kept up with their schoolwork AND I was assured by their cheerleading trainers that they would have a safe, padded training area and that they would not be subjected to standing on each others' shoulders hoping someone's skull isn't smashed in the inevitable pileup as they fall.

Actually, it's danged dangerous so it's nothing I'd be pushing my kids to do. They can play soccer, tennis, softball, any number of great athletic sports that don't involve potentially dropping from 25 feet in the air onto their heads.

It’s crucial to get perspective on these numbers. Let’s assume that Mueller’s estimate — 2.68 catastrophic injuries for every 100,000 high school cheerleaders — is accurate. In comparison, each year 17.9 of every 100,000 New York state residents are hospitalized for traffic-related pedestrian injuries — nearly seven times higher than the upper-bound catastrophic-injury rate for high school cheerleaders. So, even if cheerleading is the most dangerous high school sport, it might be less dangerous than walking to work.
Where Cheerleading Ranks in Safety Among High School Sports | FiveThirtyEight

Any comment?

I say we need to STOP treating our kids like China dolls.

Cheerleading has gotten boring in my opinion with all of the modern athletics in it, but I dont have a problem with it re safety.
 
Where Cheerleading Ranks in Safety Among High School Sports | FiveThirtyEight

Any comment?

I say we need to STOP treating our kids like China dolls.

Cheerleading has gotten boring in my opinion with all of the modern athletics in it, but I dont have a problem with it re safety.
Yeah, not enough dead kids to give a fat flying **** about it. Who cares about a few dead/paralyzed teenager cheerleaders. Let's just have our children be paralyzed or dead. Viva dead kids!!
 
Why not? Here's pictures of our guys:

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cheerleader-fat-suit.jpg


51a2e88e6198fa4b32c78c90a71039b0.jpg
 


So would you let them? I think it is a great activity for building teamwork and athletic skill.


And becoming "popular" and meeting guys, it must be said. ;)

When they were five, the little neighbor girl signed up for a little cheerleaders' camp, and because I'd been a cheerleader, I encouraged my daughter to sign up too. "No, mommie," she said. "I'm the one they'll be cheering FOR."

And that was that forever.
 
Had my daughters ever shown any interest in being a cheerleader I would have tried to steer them away from it, but I would not have prevented them from trying to be one.

A great deal would depend on their reasons for wanting to be one.

Fortunately my kids were not interested in the least in such an activity.
 
Oh, I think little cheerleader camps may actually begin when the girls are four. My kid was playing soccer when she was 4, so, sigh, why not?
 
Oh, I think little cheerleader camps may actually begin when the girls are four. My kid was playing soccer when she was 4, so, sigh, why not?

I don't view soccer and cheerleading as being equal/similar.

I don't particularly like the idea of children cheerleading.

Especially children THAT young. It smacks of beauty pageant type crap.

I'd rather a child take dance lessons, or gymnastics.
 
If my daughter wanted to, I'd have no issue. She is just finishing up her dance season though and she's more interested to do soccer now so it probably won't be anytime soon.
 
Sure why not, Dubya was a cheerleader and look what he turned out to be!
 
So would you let them? I think it is a great activity for building teamwork and athletic skill.

One post and out.... Hey Cheer-girl, maybe instead of just dropping threads and leaving, maybe you should actually interact and respond. Personally, I think that you're one of those snotty little girls who wants everyone to love her because she's a cheerleader, but hasn't the personality to be very lovable. As I've said before, my neighbor's daughter is a cheerleader and she doesn't rub people's nose in the fact. She's a sweet, lovable kid that I've gotten to watch grow up over the years into a sweet lovable young woman. Maybe you should try that sometime. My 1st suggestion on taking that path would be to lose the chip on your shoulder...
 
As long as they are not cheerleading for Trump or Hillary.
 

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