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Whoever Put Me In This Home, I'd Like To Kill Them!

AJiveMan

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Inlaws put an aunt in a nursing facility, a home, claiming she had dementia, and that she didn't know who people were.

Meanwhile, they've divested her of her home and all property including her automobile.

In a recent visit to see her, she knew who everyone was who came to see her in the nursing home.

I just sit here and steam about what they've done, and am powerless to do anything about it.

I'm glad I am not related to these vultures. /rant

Dementia ? Signs, Symptoms, Causes, Tests, Treatment, Care | alz.org
 

OrphanSlug

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Sounds like we are missing something here. Was there any other health or mental issues and what was her age? Or, did you just catch them in this purely for the cash?
 

AJiveMan

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Sounds like we are missing something here. Was there any other health or mental issues and what was her age? Or, did you just catch them in this purely for the cash?

86 Years of age.

Nope, nothing missed, other than she was slow, and just needed an in home caregiver to help her w/ needs. They claimed she had severe dementia, which was a lie, she remembers and knows who people are.

She was merely dropped in the facility by her son and daughter in law, and left.

She (the aunt) wasn't even good enough to bring to the family thanksgiving dinner, her sonnyboy took her to a restaurant the day before.

They both must think she's going to kick the bucket sooner than later.
 

OrphanSlug

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86 Years of age.

Nope, nothing missed, other than she was slow, and just needed an in home caregiver to help her w/ needs. They claimed she had severe dementia, which was a lie, she remembers and knows who people are.

She was merely dropped in the facility by her son and daughter in law, and left.

She (the aunt) wasn't even good enough to bring to the family thanksgiving dinner, her sonnyboy took her to a restaurant the day before.

They both must think she's going to kick the bucket sooner than later.

Terrible, sorry to hear about all this.
 

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It seems odd that they would be able to (legally) do this against her will. Did she volunteer to move there, or did the family members have medical power of attorney, or a physician documentation stating she is demented? Something here doesn't make any sense.
 

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It seems odd that they would be able to (legally) do this against her will. Did she volunteer to move there, or did the family members have medical power of attorney, or a physician documentation stating she is demented? Something here doesn't make any sense.

I was about to ask next if the "inlaws" gave a cut of the money to the facility that went along with this. That at least would make some sense in how they pulled this off. Still a horrible story, but would shore up a few things.
 

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I was about to ask next if the "inlaws" gave a cut of the money to the facility that went along with this. That at least would make some sense in how they pulled this off. Still a horrible story, but would shore up a few things.

I have never seen anything like what you are describing. There would be no reason for them to give any money to the facility, and I'm not sure just how that would work anyway. To me, the whole thing just doesn't make much sense as presented.
 

OrphanSlug

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I have never seen anything like what you are describing. There would be no reason for them to give any money to the facility, and I'm not sure just how that would work anyway. To me, the whole thing just doesn't make much sense as presented.

You have a good point, I was unsure how to make the story make more sense otherwise.
 

notquiteright

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Inlaws put an aunt in a nursing facility, a home, claiming she had dementia, and that she didn't know who people were. Meanwhile, they've divested her of her home and all property including her automobile. In a recent visit to see her, she knew who everyone was who came to see her in the nursing home. I just sit here and steam about what they've done, and am powerless to do anything about it. I'm glad I am not related to these vultures.

Went through the emotional meatgrinder that is dementia with my grandmother. There were good days and horrible days. She bought dozens of dresses that she never wore, had husbands here and there... long story, simple way to say it is on her bad days she wasn't my grandmother.

Some days she knew me but not my daughter, she knew my wife but not her own daughter, my aunt. Odd and depressing disease to watch take a loved one.

Now stripping a relative of all assets is fairly routine in Oklahoma as the system favors medicare/aid patients. It takes a fairly wealthy patient to forgo the state system and pay out of pocket/private insurance for a nursing home. So 'stripping' a patient of their assets isn't a cruel thing but required to qualify for the state program.

Keep a good thought, most states don't allow railroading people into homes, my grandmother resisted going to the nursing home, kept insisting she was sane. The court process to send granny to the home requires an evaluation so I doubt the inlaws could just twist your aunt's arm and force her into the home and it requires a power of attorney to sell another's property. Been through that process....
 

vesper

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Inlaws put an aunt in a nursing facility, a home, claiming she had dementia, and that she didn't know who people were.

Meanwhile, they've divested her of her home and all property including her automobile.

In a recent visit to see her, she knew who everyone was who came to see her in the nursing home.

I just sit here and steam about what they've done, and am powerless to do anything about it.

I'm glad I am not related to these vultures. /rant

Dementia ? Signs, Symptoms, Causes, Tests, Treatment, Care | alz.org
But you are related to them. They are your in-laws. You really are between a rock and a hard place. But this sounds fishy. And maybe you should check it out.
How on earth did they convince authorities she was no longer mentally capable of making sound decisions on her own behalf? There would have to be a doctor involved.

Usually the first place those who are not able to care for themselves physically is assisted living. They still have their own apartment complete with a kitchenette. But there is a staff on duty to assist them with the things they can not do for themselves. They also have a dining room where they can go and get their meals. There have planned activities such as book clubs, crochet, knitting, quilting, etc. Some of the nicer places have ice cream parlors, community gardens, Euchre card clubs, sports club activities, some have indoor pools and saunas. The grander the place, the bigger the cost. Social Security alone will not cover it. So what folks do is sell their assets and it goes into an account. If they run out of funds in these places to cover the cost, they are kicked out and sent to a government subsidized location. Even in-home assisted care isn't always covered by Social Security/Medicare and the one needing it needs to pay the difference. Same with nursing homes. There are nursing homes and then there are nursing homes. Some government subsidized and the better ones that cost out of pocket.

I understand the selling of the house/assets to offset the cost of the care. What I don't understand is how your aunt being so alert as you have described, skipped being in assisted living and was directly placed in a nursing home.

You know 40 years ago this wasn't an issue. Kids were raised watching their parents take care of their parents as they aged. When they no longer could take care of themselves, they moved them into their homes. Even their grandchildren became their legs and hands that no longer worked so good. My mother moved into my home when that became the case. My husband, my children, and myself attended to her needs. In turn she gave back riches, wonderful life lessons to my children. Neither my husband's parents nor my parents ever saw the inside of a nursing home. We made sure of that. And in return, I know neither I nor my spouse will ever see the inside of a nursing home unless it is an absolute last resort.
 

justabubba

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Inlaws put an aunt in a nursing facility, a home, claiming she had dementia, and that she didn't know who people were.

Meanwhile, they've divested her of her home and all property including her automobile.

In a recent visit to see her, she knew who everyone was who came to see her in the nursing home.

I just sit here and steam about what they've done, and am powerless to do anything about it.

I'm glad I am not related to these vultures. /rant

Dementia ? Signs, Symptoms, Causes, Tests, Treatment, Care | alz.org
circumstances may not be as they appear to you
medicaid in my area pays the $226 daily fee for skilled nursing home care
to qualify, the patient requiring medicaid coverage cannot possess assets greater than $2000
there is a term for reducing the patient's assets to that point: spend-down
the patient's monthly income is used to pay the nursing home monthly fee and anything not paid by said patient's income is paid thru medicaid
the patient keeps for their personal use $30 per month
if they have supplemental insurance, those monies can continue to be paid, as the secondary coverage is used to reduce the expense to medicaid
any contracted arrangements, such as car leases can continue to be paid, until the lease terminates
but those things necessary to maintain a home: rent/mortgage, property taxes, utilities, lawn care, insurance, cable/telephone can no longer be paid from the patient's monthly income, as that income is now dedicated to paying for the patient's nursing home stay
when the patient (or authorized representative) initiates the medicaid eligibility application, the patient's assets (and income) as of that day are determined. spend-down of the patient's liquid assets must occur within 30 days of the date of application. and it must be documented how they were liquidated to assure they were eligible expenditures for the personal benefit of the patient
knowing this process may explain the need for the (assumed) authorized representative to liquidate the patient's assets in an expedited manner
in my state, the patient's doctor (often an employee of the home where the patient is now residing) must complete and submit a form FL2 to the medicaid office. that form documents the medical need for the patient to require such extraordinary care (and its associated expense)
your state may use a different process/form, but i suspect there is going to be some medical documentation establishing the medical legitimacy of the nursing home care. however, the authorized representative would have to share that with you. but you can also have the patient identify you as an authorized representative so that you, too can review the documentation that exists to qualify her for medicaid

the patient can normally be covered for up to 100 days with medicare absorbing the cost, before medicaid kicks in

there is a five year 'reach-back' which prevents one from seeing medicaid is imminent and disposing of the patient's assets so that they cannot be used to pay for coverage before the medicaid portion is required
so, if you are older or have older family members, you may want to consider the options that exist to timely place one's assets in such a manner that they are not required to be disposed to mitigate the medicaid coverage
 

polgara

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But you are related to them. They are your in-laws. You really are between a rock and a hard place. But this sounds fishy. And maybe you should check it out.
How on earth did they convince authorities she was no longer mentally capable of making sound decisions on her own behalf? There would have to be a doctor involved.

Usually the first place those who are not able to care for themselves physically is assisted living. They still have their own apartment complete with a kitchenette. But there is a staff on duty to assist them with the things they can not do for themselves. They also have a dining room where they can go and get their meals. There have planned activities such as book clubs, crochet, knitting, quilting, etc. Some of the nicer places have ice cream parlors, community gardens, Euchre card clubs, sports club activities, some have indoor pools and saunas. The grander the place, the bigger the cost. Social Security alone will not cover it. So what folks do is sell their assets and it goes into an account. If they run out of funds in these places to cover the cost, they are kicked out and sent to a government subsidized location. Even in-home assisted care isn't always covered by Social Security/Medicare and the one needing it needs to pay the difference. Same with nursing homes. There are nursing homes and then there are nursing homes. Some government subsidized and the better ones that cost out of pocket.

I understand the selling of the house/assets to offset the cost of the care. What I don't understand is how your aunt being so alert as you have described, skipped being in assisted living and was directly placed in a nursing home.

You know 40 years ago this wasn't an issue. Kids were raised watching their parents take care of their parents as they aged. When they no longer could take care of themselves, they moved them into their homes. Even their grandchildren became their legs and hands that no longer worked so good. My mother moved into my home when that became the case. My husband, my children, and myself attended to her needs. In turn she gave back riches, wonderful life lessons to my children. Neither my husband's parents nor my parents ever saw the inside of a nursing home. We made sure of that. And in return, I know neither I nor my spouse will ever see the inside of a nursing home unless it is an absolute last resort.

Greetings, Vesper. :2wave:

I was raised the same way. At one time, my parents lived next door to me so looking out for them was easy. Then my father developed problems with his larynx which meant he couldn't speak, and my mom would get so frustrated because she didn't know what he was trying to tell her. I was called, since I had no problem understanding him, so I would hurry over and ask him to tell me what he wanted. This happened almost on a daily basis, and it was always something simple, like "when was she going to start supper because he was getting hungry," and things like that. She would query him and ask "is that what you were trying to say?", and he would vigorously nod his head yes! That usually elicited a "bozhe moi" [Oh my God] from her, so in desperation I bought him an old-fashioned typewriter so he could type out what he was trying to say, since he was familiar with those. Problem solved, and I still have some of his notes. Priceless memories for me, since he did not want a computer!

After he passed away, and as she aged, the day came when she had to leave her house and came to live with me because she had several surgeries and couldn't live alone. I really think the hardest thing for her was when she had to sell her car, though. She knew she had to, but she was always independent and she loved to travel, so it was very difficult for her to do. I always fixed what she wanted to eat, and she would say "oh, this tastes so good," even when it was only bacon and eggs. She just wasn't eating right on her own, and I'm glad I was there for her. She was sharp mentally up to the day she died, and that was a blessing, since I have read about other posters's moms on here who required constant watching for their own safety - something I never had to face. I was fortunate, and I know it.

She was hospitalized when her kidneys failed, and she refused dialysis. All us kids were there when she opted for the morphine drip, so we all got to say goodbye and asked for her forgiveness for being rotten kids sometimes, which gave us a chance to see her last smile, and within minutes she left us to greet my father who she said had waited for her for such a long time, and she missed him. :boohoo:

Remembering them at Christmas seems appropriate, so thanks for listening. *hug*
 

vesper

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Greetings, Vesper. :2wave:

I was raised the same way. At one time, my parents lived next door to me so looking out for them was easy. Then my father developed problems with his larynx which meant he couldn't speak, and my mom would get so frustrated because she didn't know what he was trying to tell her. I was called, since I had no problem understanding him, so I would hurry over and ask him to tell me what he wanted. This happened almost on a daily basis, and it was always something simple, like "when was she going to start supper because he was getting hungry," and things like that. She would query him and ask "is that what you were trying to say?", and he would vigorously nod his head yes! That usually elicited a "bozhe moi" [Oh my God] from her, so in desperation I bought him an old-fashioned typewriter so he could type out what he was trying to say, since he was familiar with those. Problem solved, and I still have some of his notes. Priceless memories for me, since he did not want a computer!

After he passed away, and as she aged, the day came when she had to leave her house and came to live with me because she had several surgeries and couldn't live alone. I really think the hardest thing for her was when she had to sell her car, though. She knew she had to, but she was always independent and she loved to travel, so it was very difficult for her to do. I always fixed what she wanted to eat, and she would say "oh, this tastes so good," even when it was only bacon and eggs. She just wasn't eating right on her own, and I'm glad I was there for her. She was sharp mentally up to the day she died, and that was a blessing, since I have read about other posters's moms on here who required constant watching for their own safety - something I never had to face. I was fortunate, and I know it.

She was hospitalized when her kidneys failed, and she refused dialysis. All us kids were there when she opted for the morphine drip, so we all got to say goodbye and asked for her forgiveness for being rotten kids sometimes, which gave us a chance to see her last smile, and within minutes she left us to greet my father who she said had waited for her for such a long time, and she missed him. :boohoo:

Remembering them at Christmas seems appropriate, so thanks for listening. *hug*

Pol you are blessed because of the way you were raised to honor your mother and father. And in doing so there are no regrets because you provided them with all you could mentally, physically and monetarily. Because of the way you honored your parents, your children learned that same precious life lessons by example.
 

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Pol you are blessed because of the way you were raised to honor your mother and father. And in doing so there are no regrets because you provided them with all you could mentally, physically and monetarily. Because of the way you honored your parents, your children learned that same precious life lessons by example.

:thumbs: I hope so, because they loved them as much as I did.
 

Gathomas88

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Inlaws put an aunt in a nursing facility, a home, claiming she had dementia, and that she didn't know who people were.

Meanwhile, they've divested her of her home and all property including her automobile.

In a recent visit to see her, she knew who everyone was who came to see her in the nursing home.

I just sit here and steam about what they've done, and am powerless to do anything about it.

I'm glad I am not related to these vultures. /rant

Dementia ? Signs, Symptoms, Causes, Tests, Treatment, Care | alz.org

Yea... I'll care for my elderly relatives myself before I put them in a home.

My mother worked as a nurse at one briefly. The kind of stories she told about the place were horrific.
 

JumpinJack

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Yea... I'll care for my elderly relatives myself before I put them in a home.

My mother worked as a nurse at one briefly. The kind of stories she told about the place were horrific.

I have a relative in a nursing home. It's very sad. But there was nothing else to do. She can't be cared for in a home setting. She first had a massive stroke, leaving her partially disabled. Then she broke her hip in the nursing home. She must be cared for around the clock, including personal hygiene, going to the bathroom, etc. She's not that old. She just lived the sort of lifestyle that led to an early stroke. But that's the way it can get with elderly people. You don't just prop them in front of the tv and cook for them. You have to assist them in moving, using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed. It's too difficult for them to get up, for example, just to get a glass of water, so you wait on them that way, too. Then if they get forgetful, you have to make sure they don't wander out of the house and get lost.

If people work and are faced with a serious situation like that, there is little else to do but institutionalize the person. That's how our society has evolved. That's another issue, too....about 1/3rd of our adult population is obese. When they have strokes, they are even more so unable to be cared for at home because of their size. You can't hold them up to prevent a fall, help them get to the bathroom or into a wheelchair. It's just logistics and strength. Thank goodness for Medicare or Medicaid.
 

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It seems odd that they would be able to (legally) do this against her will. Did she volunteer to move there, or did the family members have medical power of attorney, or a physician documentation stating she is demented? Something here doesn't make any sense.

I don't know about the legality of this, but when nieces asked questions, the son became very irritated, agitated, angry and simply stated it was none of their business.

I'm still in shock that the son has told his mother of nothing that he's done.

I'm thinking he must have some powers, otherwise what he's doing might not be legal.

During the visit yesterday, nieces noticed there were no, none, notta Christmas decorations, or Christmas cards sent to her, in her room.

This has gotten very very cold, it makes me want to throw up, I treat my 4 legged friend better than he's treating his mom.
 

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Inlaws put an aunt in a nursing facility, a home, claiming she had dementia, and that she didn't know who people were.

Meanwhile, they've divested her of her home and all property including her automobile.

In a recent visit to see her, she knew who everyone was who came to see her in the nursing home.

I just sit here and steam about what they've done, and am powerless to do anything about it.

I'm glad I am not related to these vultures. /rant

Dementia ? Signs, Symptoms, Causes, Tests, Treatment, Care | alz.org

People with dementia can be perfectly fine one day and completely lost the next. Don't judge her condition based on one visit. As far as the divestment is concerned, that can be a case of protecting her assets (not syaing that it is, but that this is a common practice). You see, if she has assets, then she is expected to pay for her care out of those assets. If she none, then Medicare kicks in and pays the bills. So it's a common practice to liquidate assets, place them into a trust managed by and held by the kids, but being executed by her requests. Don't jump to conclusions based on what things look like. If you really feel that there is abuse going on, there avenues to take to get things checked out.
 

notquiteright

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Yea... I'll care for my elderly relatives myself before I put them in a home. My mother worked as a nurse at one briefly. The kind of stories she told about the place were horrific.

How will you earn a living while caring for an elderly say dementia relative? They are not bed ridden, quite mobile in fact. Bedridden they require a bedpan as well as things like shots and somewhat advanced medical treatment.

Easy to say, difficult to do.... :peace
 

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Inlaws put an aunt in a nursing facility, a home, claiming she had dementia, and that she didn't know who people were.

Meanwhile, they've divested her of her home and all property including her automobile.

In a recent visit to see her, she knew who everyone was who came to see her in the nursing home.

I just sit here and steam about what they've done, and am powerless to do anything about it.

I'm glad I am not related to these vultures. /rant

Dementia ? Signs, Symptoms, Causes, Tests, Treatment, Care | alz.org

This sounds terrible but I would like to point out that Dementia/Alzheimer's can be on and off. Sometimes the people will be 100% normal and other times they wont know who anyone is or think it is 20-30-40 years ago. From your post it could be you just saw her on a good day.
Unfortunately I have seen this with one of my grandmothers and a friends dad. It is a terrible thing to happen to someone and terrible to watch.
I can only hope that this is the case otherwise it sounds like you have utter D******s as relatives.
Wishing the best for your Aunt.
 

ocean515

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I don't know about the legality of this, but when nieces asked questions, the son became very irritated, agitated, angry and simply stated it was none of their business.

I'm still in shock that the son has told his mother of nothing that he's done.

I'm thinking he must have some powers, otherwise what he's doing might not be legal.

During the visit yesterday, nieces noticed there were no, none, notta Christmas decorations, or Christmas cards sent to her, in her room.

This has gotten very very cold, it makes me want to throw up, I treat my 4 legged friend better than he's treating his mom.

My wife practices law in the field of estate planning, wills, estates, etc.. There are laws to protect people in circumstances such as this. I suggest the nieces get busy and on the phone. There are lawyers in every area who are very well versed in circumstances you have described.

Unfortunately this is a VERY common thing.
 

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People with dementia can be perfectly fine one day and completely lost the next. Don't judge her condition based on one visit. As far as the divestment is concerned, that can be a case of protecting her assets (not syaing that it is, but that this is a common practice). You see, if she has assets, then she is expected to pay for her care out of those assets. If she none, then Medicare kicks in and pays the bills. So it's a common practice to liquidate assets, place them into a trust managed by and held by the kids, but being executed by her requests. Don't jump to conclusions based on what things look like. If you really feel that there is abuse going on, there avenues to take to get things checked out.

As I understand it, her late husband worked for the county court house in a high capacity, she receives his death benefit pension fund, she has social security - probably not the full amount, plus the property and items she once owned.

I understand about liquidating assets before the county, state or fed attach a brick to those. It is possible her sonny was on the land title as and/or, and her vehicle too.

My spouse works in a nursing facility and she's told me medicare (if available) will not pay anything unless or until all assets and monies are exhausted. Her (the aunt) being in such a good financial condition before this, I am just about sure she had some sort of health insurance policy.

I'm just wondering why her sonnyboy didn't hire an in home caregiver, which would have been much less expensive than a nursing facility.

By the time the assets are sold and gone, they'll just have her life insurance policy for funeral expenses. After talking to the nieces last weekend, I have to believe that money is the motivation and her darling daughter in law is behind it.
 

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I have a relative in a nursing home. It's very sad. But there was nothing else to do. She can't be cared for in a home setting. She first had a massive stroke, leaving her partially disabled. Then she broke her hip in the nursing home. She must be cared for around the clock, including personal hygiene, going to the bathroom, etc. She's not that old. She just lived the sort of lifestyle that led to an early stroke. But that's the way it can get with elderly people. You don't just prop them in front of the tv and cook for them. You have to assist them in moving, using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed. It's too difficult for them to get up, for example, just to get a glass of water, so you wait on them that way, too. Then if they get forgetful, you have to make sure they don't wander out of the house and get lost.

If people work and are faced with a serious situation like that, there is little else to do but institutionalize the person. That's how our society has evolved. That's another issue, too....about 1/3rd of our adult population is obese. When they have strokes, they are even more so unable to be cared for at home because of their size. You can't hold them up to prevent a fall, help them get to the bathroom or into a wheelchair. It's just logistics and strength. Thank goodness for Medicare or Medicaid.

I know that JJ, and I do appreciate your post.

When my mom was diagnosed with terminal cancer, Hospice Alliance wanted to institutionalize her, my mom and I sat with a cup of coffee and had a frank discussion of what she wanted. She wanted to be home. We took care of her until the end, she passed quietly on a late cloudy November afternoon, two days before Veterans Day.
 

Gathomas88

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I have a relative in a nursing home. It's very sad. But there was nothing else to do. She can't be cared for in a home setting. She first had a massive stroke, leaving her partially disabled. Then she broke her hip in the nursing home. She must be cared for around the clock, including personal hygiene, going to the bathroom, etc. She's not that old. She just lived the sort of lifestyle that led to an early stroke. But that's the way it can get with elderly people. You don't just prop them in front of the tv and cook for them. You have to assist them in moving, using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed. It's too difficult for them to get up, for example, just to get a glass of water, so you wait on them that way, too. Then if they get forgetful, you have to make sure they don't wander out of the house and get lost.

If people work and are faced with a serious situation like that, there is little else to do but institutionalize the person. That's how our society has evolved. That's another issue, too....about 1/3rd of our adult population is obese. When they have strokes, they are even more so unable to be cared for at home because of their size. You can't hold them up to prevent a fall, help them get to the bathroom or into a wheelchair. It's just logistics and strength. Thank goodness for Medicare or Medicaid.

How will you earn a living while caring for an elderly say dementia relative? They are not bed ridden, quite mobile in fact. Bedridden they require a bedpan as well as things like shots and somewhat advanced medical treatment.

Easy to say, difficult to do.... :peace

Well, if it can't be avoided, it can't be avoided. However, I still wouldn't dream of treating such a thing as ever being anything more than an absolute "last resort."

You could probably just hire a caretaker for roughly the same amount of money it'd take to put a relative in a half-way decent home anyway.

My mother actually worked at one of the nicer and more expensive "upper class" establishments, and the tenants were still being flagrantly abused and neglected.
 

faithful_servant

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As I understand it, her late husband worked for the county court house in a high capacity, she receives his death benefit pension fund, she has social security - probably not the full amount, plus the property and items she once owned.

I understand about liquidating assets before the county, state or fed attach a brick to those. It is possible her sonny was on the land title as and/or, and her vehicle too.

My spouse works in a nursing facility and she's told me medicare (if available) will not pay anything unless or until all assets and monies are exhausted. Her (the aunt) being in such a good financial condition before this, I am just about sure she had some sort of health insurance policy.

I'm just wondering why her sonnyboy didn't hire an in home caregiver, which would have been much less expensive than a nursing facility.

By the time the assets are sold and gone, they'll just have her life insurance policy for funeral expenses. After talking to the nieces last weekend, I have to believe that money is the motivation and her darling daughter in law is behind it.

If you're turly concerned, what are you DOING about it?? JUst one search on Google and I came up with a couple of possible resources.
Wisconsin Aging Advocacy Network
http://cwagwisconsin.org/elder-law-center/wisconsin-elderly-benefit-specialist-program/

Call AARP and see wha thtey can tell you, call your local hospital and ask if they have a list of patient advocates. Have you done any of these or you just here complaining about hte situation and DOING nothing about it???
 
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