• This is a political forum that is non-biased/non-partisan and treats every person's position on topics equally. This debate forum is not aligned to any political party. In today's politics, many ideas are split between and even within all the political parties. Often we find ourselves agreeing on one platform but some topics break our mold. We are here to discuss them in a civil political debate. If this is your first visit to our political forums, be sure to check out the RULES. Registering for debate politics is necessary before posting. Register today to participate - it's free!

Who Will Benefit From Psychedelic Medicine? (1 Viewer)

JacksinPA

Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Monthly Donator
Joined
Dec 3, 2017
Messages
26,290
Reaction score
16,773
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Progressive

These substances are being touted as a game-changing intervention for mental health. But it’s not clear if their promise will be accessible to all.

n a sweaty Sunday morning in August of last year, Jamilah George was on the 16th floor of the historic Brown Hotel in Louisville, leading a spiritual service of sorts. George, a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at the University of Connecticut who also holds a master’s degree in divinity from Yale University, asked the audience to shout out the names of ancestors or people they admired. With each name, George performed a libation ritual, pouring water into a leafy green plant, stationed at the front of the podium, as a gesture of thanks. “Maya Angelou,” called out one audience member. “Mama Lola,” called another. The names kept coming: Toni Morrison. Audre Lorde. Mahatma Gandhi. Harriet Tubman.

George, who had been part of a team at U-Conn. running the only clinical trial to study the effects of the psychotropic drug MDMA on post-traumatic stress disorder with participants of color, wanted the audience to connect with its cultural lineages before she started her presentation — a bracing call for inclusion and social justice within the burgeoning world of psychedelic healing. It’s a world that holds great promise but is overwhelmingly White and economically privileged. Part of the problem, as George sees it, is that academia has lost its connection to the histories of these consciousness-altering substances (also known as entheogens), many of which have been used by Indigenous cultures for physical and psychological healing for thousands of years. (more)
=============================================================
Thesis: use of psilocybin & Ecstacy to treat PTSD. But over-policing of non-white minorities may present a barrier to their inclusion in these therapies.
 

These substances are being touted as a game-changing intervention for mental health. But it’s not clear if their promise will be accessible to all.

n a sweaty Sunday morning in August of last year, Jamilah George was on the 16th floor of the historic Brown Hotel in Louisville, leading a spiritual service of sorts. George, a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at the University of Connecticut who also holds a master’s degree in divinity from Yale University, asked the audience to shout out the names of ancestors or people they admired. With each name, George performed a libation ritual, pouring water into a leafy green plant, stationed at the front of the podium, as a gesture of thanks. “Maya Angelou,” called out one audience member. “Mama Lola,” called another. The names kept coming: Toni Morrison. Audre Lorde. Mahatma Gandhi. Harriet Tubman.

George, who had been part of a team at U-Conn. running the only clinical trial to study the effects of the psychotropic drug MDMA on post-traumatic stress disorder with participants of color, wanted the audience to connect with its cultural lineages before she started her presentation — a bracing call for inclusion and social justice within the burgeoning world of psychedelic healing. It’s a world that holds great promise but is overwhelmingly White and economically privileged. Part of the problem, as George sees it, is that academia has lost its connection to the histories of these consciousness-altering substances (also known as entheogens), many of which have been used by Indigenous cultures for physical and psychological healing for thousands of years. (more)
=============================================================
Thesis: use of psilocybin & Ecstacy to treat PTSD. But over-policing of non-white minorities may present a barrier to their inclusion in these therapies.
FINALLY!!!

Timothy Leary is being vindicated.

(Of course, the difference is Leary was a scientist. This lady sounds like a nutjob.)
 
Shrooms, MDMA, and LSD should be legalized, treated like pot and alcohol. The image of these drugs is 99.99999% government hype, 0.000001% the dumbass you can't trust with even a can of RAID. The latter, you can't do anything about.

Really, anything less harmful than alcohol....which basically just leaves meth, coke, heroin/opiates on the illegal side, though I want decriminalization and treatment programs for individual users.




And, yes, I know this is about medicinal use, in treatment. No matter what else we do about our perverse drug laws, that should absolutely be allowed. Far more dangerous meds are prescribed regularly.
 

These substances are being touted as a game-changing intervention for mental health. But it’s not clear if their promise will be accessible to all.

n a sweaty Sunday morning in August of last year, Jamilah George was on the 16th floor of the historic Brown Hotel in Louisville, leading a spiritual service of sorts. George, a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at the University of Connecticut who also holds a master’s degree in divinity from Yale University, asked the audience to shout out the names of ancestors or people they admired. With each name, George performed a libation ritual, pouring water into a leafy green plant, stationed at the front of the podium, as a gesture of thanks. “Maya Angelou,” called out one audience member. “Mama Lola,” called another. The names kept coming: Toni Morrison. Audre Lorde. Mahatma Gandhi. Harriet Tubman.

George, who had been part of a team at U-Conn. running the only clinical trial to study the effects of the psychotropic drug MDMA on post-traumatic stress disorder with participants of color, wanted the audience to connect with its cultural lineages before she started her presentation — a bracing call for inclusion and social justice within the burgeoning world of psychedelic healing. It’s a world that holds great promise but is overwhelmingly White and economically privileged. Part of the problem, as George sees it, is that academia has lost its connection to the histories of these consciousness-altering substances (also known as entheogens), many of which have been used by Indigenous cultures for physical and psychological healing for thousands of years. (more)
=============================================================
Thesis: use of psilocybin & Ecstacy to treat PTSD. But over-policing of non-white minorities may present a barrier to their inclusion in these therapies.

I broke free of the prison of autism thanks to experimentation with psychedelics.
I am an Aspie.
 
I think they would benefit terminally ill people. Psychedelics are supposed to diminish, if not eliminate, the fear of death.
 
I think they would benefit terminally ill people. Psychedelics are supposed to diminish, if not eliminate, the fear of death.

They do. With guidance, they appear to allow one to reconcile with the impending future.

Having played around quite a bit some decades ago, I can see why. You inhabit a new perspective, if you've got a few working neurons.
 
FINALLY!!!

Timothy Leary is being vindicated.

(Of course, the difference is Leary was a scientist. This lady sounds like a nutjob.)
One pill makes you larger
and one pill makes you smaller . . .
 
They do. With guidance, they appear to allow one to reconcile with the impending future.

Having played around quite a bit some decades ago, I can see why. You inhabit a new perspective, if you've got a few working neurons.

I've taken a few drugs in my time, but never psychedelics. They've always scared me a little but I find them intriguing as well. I think the biggest reason I haven't tried any yet is that most last for an incredibly long time. Not sure if I want to commit several hours to possibly having a bad experience. I know DMT is a very short experience, but I wouldn't have a clue where to get it.
 
I've taken a few drugs in my time, but never psychedelics. They've always scared me a little but I find them intriguing as well. I think the biggest reason I haven't tried any yet is that most last for an incredibly long time. Not sure if I want to commit several hours to possibly having a bad experience. I know DMT is a very short experience, but I wouldn't have a clue where to get it.

I raised cactus that contained mescaline. I developed a method for extracting the mescaline without using any flammable or toxic solvents. Taken in the morning, I would be intoxicated for at least 6 hours.

The one I would like to try is 5-methoxyDMT which is found in glands in the Sonoran Desert Toad. Incredible rush, short acing. The DMTs are called the Business Man's Trip because you could do them over lunch break. Unfortunately for experimenter's, that toad is Protected.
 
I raised cactus that contained mescaline. I developed a method for extracting the mescaline without using any flammable or toxic solvents. Taken in the morning, I would be intoxicated for at least 6 hours.

The one I would like to try is 5-methoxyDMT which is found in glands in the Sonoran Desert Toad. Incredible rush, short acing. The DMTs are called the Business Man's Trip because you could do them over lunch break. Unfortunately for experimenter's, that toad is Protected.

Yeah, six hours is a long time. How did you extract the mescaline without toxic solvents? DMT supposedly 5-10 minutes, or slightly longer. I guess I need to find me a toad.
 
Yeah, six hours is a long time. How did you extract the mescaline without toxic solvents? DMT supposedly 5-10 minutes, or slightly longer. I guess I need to find me a toad.
My degree is in chemistry. Mescaline is insoluble in water - at room temperature. But it is very soluble in hot/boiling water.
 

These substances are being touted as a game-changing intervention for mental health. But it’s not clear if their promise will be accessible to all.

n a sweaty Sunday morning in August of last year, Jamilah George was on the 16th floor of the historic Brown Hotel in Louisville, leading a spiritual service of sorts. George, a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at the University of Connecticut who also holds a master’s degree in divinity from Yale University, asked the audience to shout out the names of ancestors or people they admired. With each name, George performed a libation ritual, pouring water into a leafy green plant, stationed at the front of the podium, as a gesture of thanks. “Maya Angelou,” called out one audience member. “Mama Lola,” called another. The names kept coming: Toni Morrison. Audre Lorde. Mahatma Gandhi. Harriet Tubman.

George, who had been part of a team at U-Conn. running the only clinical trial to study the effects of the psychotropic drug MDMA on post-traumatic stress disorder with participants of color, wanted the audience to connect with its cultural lineages before she started her presentation — a bracing call for inclusion and social justice within the burgeoning world of psychedelic healing. It’s a world that holds great promise but is overwhelmingly White and economically privileged. Part of the problem, as George sees it, is that academia has lost its connection to the histories of these consciousness-altering substances (also known as entheogens), many of which have been used by Indigenous cultures for physical and psychological healing for thousands of years. (more)
=============================================================
Thesis: use of psilocybin & Ecstacy to treat PTSD. But over-policing of non-white minorities may present a barrier to their inclusion in these therapies.
From what I understand that there is some promising research on use of MDMA in people with PTSD. I have looked into it, but it is in the early stages and I am waiting to see what the success rates are.

They are also using some treatments in depression, etc....which are showing promise.
 
From what I understand that there is some promising research on use of MDMA in people with PTSD. I have looked into it, but it is in the early stages and I am waiting to see what the success rates are.

They are also using some treatments in depression, etc....which are showing promise.
Psilocybin from magic mushrooms is also being evaluated for its effect in psychiatry. Timothy Leary used it in studies at Harvard but he was using pure, synthetic drug made by Sandoz.
 
Psilocybin from magic mushrooms is also being evaluated for its effect in psychiatry. Timothy Leary used it in studies at Harvard but he was using pure, synthetic drug made by Sandoz.
I find it fascinating the research being done on this...and I wait hoping that it is a success, because this could be something that will help people like me. I have PTSD that has shown to be fairly resistant to treatment via medication...behavior has helped to make it tolerable. ..but the meds turn me into a zombie so I threw them out some time ago...except the medication that helps me with nightmares...and that is all I take now.
 
The reason I do not feel like a typical Asperger's person is because of the benefits of psychedelics back in the 1970's.
Everyone who used to know me as a kid says I am a completely different person since I turned sixteen.

JeffH196667 (2019_02_27 17_41_55 UTC).png JeffH VW Bug.jpg
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top Bottom