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Which Generation Are YOU?

Which Generattion Are YOU?

  • G.I./Greatest Generation, born between 1901 – 1926.

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  • Total voters
    128

Captain Adverse

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I thought it would be interesting to see which "Generation" members of the Forum (at least those actually actively participating) fall within.

First to simply see the spread of actively participating member's "Generational" categories. (There are many, many who've joined but stopped participating)

Second, to see if various political viewpoints do tend to fall generally within "Generational" categories.


NOTE: The categories have been pre-determined by a couple of sources:

How Every Generation of the Last Century Got Its Nickname.
Generation Naming: What Came Before Millennials and Founders | Time

and:

The Six Living Generations In America.
The Six Living Generations In America

Here are the Options:

1. G.I./Greatest Generation, born between 1901 – 1926. "Children of the WWI generation & fighters in WWII & young in the Great Depression…all leading to strong models of teamwork to overcome and progress."

2. Mature/Silent Generation, born between 1927 – 1945. "Went through their formative years during an era of suffocating conformity, but also during the postwar happiness; Korean and Vietnam War generation."

3. Baby Boomers, born between 1946 – 1964. "1. The save-the-world revolutionaries of the ’60s and ’70s; and 2. The party-hardy career climbers (Yuppies) of the ’70s/’80s. The 'Me' Generation."

4. Generation X, born between 1965 – 1980. "The “latch-key kids” grew up street-smart but isolated, often with divorced or career-driven parents. Government and big business mean little to them. Want to save the neighborhood, not the world."

5. Generation Y/ Millennials, born between 1981 – 2000. "They have been told over and over again that they are special, and they expect the world to treat them that way. They do not live to work, they prefer a more relaxed work environment with a lot of hand holding and accolades."

6. Generation Z/ Boomlets, born after 2001. "In 2006 there were a record number of births in the US and 49% of those born were Hispanic, this will change the American melting pot in terms of behavior and culture. They have never known a world without computers and cell phones. Have Eco-fatigue: they are actually tired of hearing about the environment and the many ways we have to save it."

So which do you fall in?
 
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I thought it would be interesting to see which "Generation" members of the Forum (at least those actually actively participating) fall within.

First to see simply to see the spread of actively participating members "Generational" categories.

Second, to see if various political viewpoints do tend to fall generally within "Generational" categories.


The categories have been pre-determined by a couple of sources:

Generation Naming: What Came Before Millennials and Founders | Time

and:

The Six Living Generations In America

Here are the Options:

1. G.I./Greatest Generation, born between 1901 – 1926. "Children of the WWI generation & fighters in WWII & young in the Great Depression…all leading to strong models of teamwork to overcome and progress."

2. Mature/Silent Generation, born between 1927 – 1945. "Went through their formative years during an era of suffocating conformity, but also during the postwar happiness; Korean and Vietnam War generation."

3. Baby Boomers, born between 1946 – 1964. "1. The save-the-world revolutionaries of the ’60s and ’70s; and 2. The party-hardy career climbers (Yuppies) of the ’70s/’80s. The 'Me' Generation."

4. Generation X, born between 1965 – 1980. "The “latch-key kids” grew up street-smart but isolated, often with divorced or career-driven parents. Government and big business mean little to them. Want to save the neighborhood, not the world."

5. Generation Y/ Millennials, born between 1981 – 2000. "They have been told over and over again that they are special, and they expect the world to treat them that way. They do not live to work, they prefer a more relaxed work environment with a lot of hand holding and accolades."

6. Generation Z/ Boomlets, born after 2001. "In 2006 there were a record number of births in the US and 49% of those born were Hispanic, this will change the American melting pot in terms of behavior and culture. They have never known a world without computers and cell phones. Have Eco-fatigue: they are actually tired of hearing about the environment and the many ways we have to save it."

So which do you fall in?
the 1840’s. When blacks and whites were equals.
 
Gen X. Barely. Silly concept, but there you go.
 
I thought it would be interesting to see which "Generation" members of the Forum (at least those actually actively participating) fall within.

First to see simply to see the spread of actively participating members "Generational" categories.

Second, to see if various political viewpoints do tend to fall generally within "Generational" categories.


The categories have been pre-determined by a couple of sources:

Generation Naming: What Came Before Millennials and Founders | Time

and:

The Six Living Generations In America

Here are the Options:

1. G.I./Greatest Generation, born between 1901 – 1926. "Children of the WWI generation & fighters in WWII & young in the Great Depression…all leading to strong models of teamwork to overcome and progress."

2. Mature/Silent Generation, born between 1927 – 1945. "Went through their formative years during an era of suffocating conformity, but also during the postwar happiness; Korean and Vietnam War generation."

3. Baby Boomers, born between 1946 – 1964. "1. The save-the-world revolutionaries of the ’60s and ’70s; and 2. The party-hardy career climbers (Yuppies) of the ’70s/’80s. The 'Me' Generation."

4. Generation X, born between 1965 – 1980. "The “latch-key kids” grew up street-smart but isolated, often with divorced or career-driven parents. Government and big business mean little to them. Want to save the neighborhood, not the world."

5. Generation Y/ Millennials, born between 1981 – 2000. "They have been told over and over again that they are special, and they expect the world to treat them that way. They do not live to work, they prefer a more relaxed work environment with a lot of hand holding and accolades."

6. Generation Z/ Boomlets, born after 2001. "In 2006 there were a record number of births in the US and 49% of those born were Hispanic, this will change the American melting pot in terms of behavior and culture. They have never known a world without computers and cell phones. Have Eco-fatigue: they are actually tired of hearing about the environment and the many ways we have to save it."

So which do you fall in?

I was born in early '64. Originally "Gen x" started with the death of Kennedy or the arrival of the Beatles, depending on who was talking about it.

So I do not appreciate being lumped in with the boomers. I could have been born to people conceived when the soldiers came home. I certainly never identified with them.
 
mtv.jpg
 
Given your user name of eco farm, I would guess that your generation is electrical power generation.

Methane.
 
When the use of generation letters started to be used it was dumb to use X, Y and Z. What letter are generations born in 2021 (and beyond) going to be assigned?

Also odd is that generations contain a variable number of years.
 
I thought it would be interesting to see which "Generation" members of the Forum (at least those actually actively participating) fall within.

First to simply see the spread of actively participating member's "Generational" categories. (There are many, many who've joined but stopped participating)

Second, to see if various political viewpoints do tend to fall generally within "Generational" categories.


NOTE: The categories have been pre-determined by a couple of sources:

Generation Naming: What Came Before Millennials and Founders | Time

and:

The Six Living Generations In America

Here are the Options:

1. G.I./Greatest Generation, born between 1901 – 1926. "Children of the WWI generation & fighters in WWII & young in the Great Depression…all leading to strong models of teamwork to overcome and progress."

2. Mature/Silent Generation, born between 1927 – 1945. "Went through their formative years during an era of suffocating conformity, but also during the postwar happiness; Korean and Vietnam War generation."

3. Baby Boomers, born between 1946 – 1964. "1. The save-the-world revolutionaries of the ’60s and ’70s; and 2. The party-hardy career climbers (Yuppies) of the ’70s/’80s. The 'Me' Generation."

4. Generation X, born between 1965 – 1980. "The “latch-key kids” grew up street-smart but isolated, often with divorced or career-driven parents. Government and big business mean little to them. Want to save the neighborhood, not the world."

5. Generation Y/ Millennials, born between 1981 – 2000. "They have been told over and over again that they are special, and they expect the world to treat them that way. They do not live to work, they prefer a more relaxed work environment with a lot of hand holding and accolades."

6. Generation Z/ Boomlets, born after 2001. "In 2006 there were a record number of births in the US and 49% of those born were Hispanic, this will change the American melting pot in terms of behavior and culture. They have never known a world without computers and cell phones. Have Eco-fatigue: they are actually tired of hearing about the environment and the many ways we have to save it."

So which do you fall in?
The description of Millennials is biased, I think.

In part because I am one, in part because I think it's wrong.
 
5. Generation Y/ Millennials, born between 1981 – 2000. "They have been told over and over again that they are special, and they expect the world to treat them that way. They do not live to work, they prefer a more relaxed work environment with a lot of hand holding and accolades."

The description of Millennials is biased, I think. In part because I am one, in part because I think it's wrong.

The description of Millennials is based off of what Baby Boomers - aka the worst American generation ever - think of Millennials.

Personally, I dish the Boomer attitude right back at them, because Boomers are the trust fund babies of America. Inherited a country they had no part in creating from their parents, took the benefits, failed to appreciate it, and then left nothing behind ... all while being self-righteous about it.
 
The description of Millennials is biased, I think.

In part because I am one, in part because I think it's wrong.

They all seem wrong and painted for a narrative. Since when are my generation not globalists?

"They're nationalists"...

"They're tired of environmentalism"...


What's going on here.
 
Maybe it's because I'm an older Mellinnial, but I certainly don't expect the world to treat me as such, given past experience.

Although it would have been nice if the system (american dream?) hadn't been smashed to the point where upward mobility is not much of a thing anymore.
 
Personally I am 1957, thus squarely in the Boomer generation, however I do think it is a bit narrow minded to categorize ALL of a particular generation with a one size fits all definition:

"Inherited a country they had no part in creating from their parents, took the benefits, failed to appreciate it, and then left nothing behind ... all while being self-righteous about it."

I tend to take a sympathetic view of millennials, even if I am noting some of the issues that hobble them.
They are inheriting a crappy deck of cards compared to what I was blessed with, but I often find I am struggling to get through to them what it was that gave my generation a relatively GOOD deck of cards by comparison.
That's because some of them are already "true believers" with a myopic view of history, which is often polluted by historical revisionism.
That is not their fault at all, they're being spoon fed some pretty egregious lies. They didn't create them, and they aren't always even aware of the agenda being foisted on them.

My millennial daughter works her behind off, she is intellectually curious, she is good with critical thinking skills and she doesn't expect a prize "just for participating".
Sure sure, she subscribes to a wee bit too much political correctness, but the takeaway here is that, you can talk to her, you can debate the issues with her and she will listen. She doesn't go screeching off in a frantic search for "safe spaces" or demand censorship.

But that is more than I can say for some of her peers. But again, I try to be mindful of the fact that more than a few of them get spoon fed inaccurate information, or not even enough information at all in the first place.
For instance, back around the time she graduated high school, we got into a discussion one day about how we're handicapping our own manufacturing and even our own research and development.
(Our inadequate protections for research and development intellectual property is one area where I actually agree with Trump!)

She was incredulous. What research and development, she wanted to know...after all, the Japanese and Chinese are the ones who are responsible for all the technology we enjoy today, she said. The computer, HDTV, all the technology that drives modern medicine, the advancement in our automobiles. The Japanese invented ALL of it, according to her.

I nearly fainted, or would have, if not for the fact that I was laughing. The look on her face was priceless.
I had to sit her down and explain that the microprocessor, and everything and anything to do with microprocessors, was invented right here in the USA a long long time ago. She couldn't believe it.
I had to show her that my very first real W-2 job back in 1973 was at the company that built the very first commercially available computer modems. (Penril Data Corp in Rockville, Maryland)

Over the years we have had a lot of discussions like this, where I have to debunk some popular mythology that she'd been fed, on a variety of issues.

No, I don't condemn millennials at all. I might tease and poke fun a little but the torch is being passed to them, and I wish good things for them, ONLY good things, and I feel it is our responsibility to help them understand history and the role that history, the REAL ACTUAL HISTORY (not the phony nonsense being peddled) plays in their future, and ours.

Millennials have my heart and soul. We are failing them big time right now. We've BEEN failing them.
And we need to turn that around.
 
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And brothern, you have no earthly idea how much a good many of us Boomers appreciate what we were blessed with.
Simple as that.
 
I am one of the last of the boomers.
 
I thought it would be interesting to see which "Generation" members of the Forum (at least those actually actively participating) fall within.

First to simply see the spread of actively participating member's "Generational" categories. (There are many, many who've joined but stopped participating)

Second, to see if various political viewpoints do tend to fall generally within "Generational" categories.


NOTE: The categories have been pre-determined by a couple of sources:

Generation Naming: What Came Before Millennials and Founders | Time

and:

The Six Living Generations In America

Here are the Options:

1. G.I./Greatest Generation, born between 1901 – 1926. "Children of the WWI generation & fighters in WWII & young in the Great Depression…all leading to strong models of teamwork to overcome and progress."

2. Mature/Silent Generation, born between 1927 – 1945. "Went through their formative years during an era of suffocating conformity, but also during the postwar happiness; Korean and Vietnam War generation."

3. Baby Boomers, born between 1946 – 1964. "1. The save-the-world revolutionaries of the ’60s and ’70s; and 2. The party-hardy career climbers (Yuppies) of the ’70s/’80s. The 'Me' Generation."

4. Generation X, born between 1965 – 1980. "The “latch-key kids” grew up street-smart but isolated, often with divorced or career-driven parents. Government and big business mean little to them. Want to save the neighborhood, not the world."

5. Generation Y/ Millennials, born between 1981 – 2000. "They have been told over and over again that they are special, and they expect the world to treat them that way. They do not live to work, they prefer a more relaxed work environment with a lot of hand holding and accolades."

6. Generation Z/ Boomlets, born after 2001. "In 2006 there were a record number of births in the US and 49% of those born were Hispanic, this will change the American melting pot in terms of behavior and culture. They have never known a world without computers and cell phones. Have Eco-fatigue: they are actually tired of hearing about the environment and the many ways we have to save it."

So which do you fall in?

Wow biased much on those descriptions?

We get it, you're old and aging is uncomfortable. You don't quite understand change, or why your generation is responsible for it being the first time one generation didn't leave a better world for another. We get that you were handed everything by your parents and squandered it away selfishly and want to distract from that by claiming millennials are snow flakes for wanting things like fair pay, housing, food.

We get that. So you can shut the **** up about it already.
 
Maybe it's because I'm an older Mellinnial, but I certainly don't expect the world to treat me as such, given past experience.

Although it would have been nice if the system (american dream?) hadn't been smashed to the point where upward mobility is not much of a thing anymore.

Upward mobility only existed as long as The New Deal existed.
I don't think a lot of you are even aware of the fact that the term itself was more or less INVENTED as PART OF the entire argument to support The New Deal in the first place.

No, it wasn't LITERALLY invented then, what I am trying to say is, we heard it NONSTOP when The New Deal was being argued and continually expanded when I was growing up. In fact, when Reagan took office, the very first thing he began to attack was the core of the New Deal. It was like we were the USS Cole and he was the guy in the small boat shooting at us with his Exocet missile.
As far as Reagan was concerned, The New Deal, which HE PERSONALLY benefited from his entire life, was just a huge pleasure boat full of "free stuff" and we were just moochers. Of course he didn't put it that way, far from it. He talked in somber tones of our "economic crisis" and all our "debt" and the fact that "government was the problem".

He sure didn't mind traveling through all those Southern states that had been electrified by the Tennessee Valley Authority and he sure didn't seem to mind looking out over the vast expanses of Interstate Highway built by the Eisenhower administration with New Deal money, he sure didn't seem to mind that people had the free time to come and participate in his sweep through the country thanks to all the decent paying union jobs, and he certainly was grateful at having mastered his craft of public speaking thanks to his lifelong career with SAG-AFTRA.

Nope, his real problem was that government was evil and that we spent too much time worrying about whether the media was giving fair and equal time to the opposition, and he wanted everyone to buy into his false narrative about a "welfare queen" who in reality was a professional who had a lifelong career as an actual criminal. But he wanted America to think that's how ALL poor people behaved.

The New Deal is upward mobility, and it always was. That was the point OF The New Deal, because The New Deal was support for programs which created opportunities for hard working people to get a leg up and improve their lot in life, to lift themselves out of generational poverty. The New Deal was an effort at harnessing the economy to serve the working class FIRST.
 
I am a Gen X. Born 1976. Though I think culturally there is nothing that separates the Gen Xers born in the 70s and the Millennials born in the 80s.
 
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