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Where are our carriers today ?

APACHERAT

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Of the U.S. Navy's ten Nimitz class carriers, only two are at sea and both are in the 5th Fleet AOR.

The 7th Fleet AOR carrier CVN-73 Washington has been in port in Yokosuka, Japan since March of 2013 with maintenance problems. Ship still waiting for funding and spare parts.

Three carriers that are suppose to be "surge carriers" are in different stages of predeployment training and attending mandatory sensitivity training courses.

Four carriers are going no where, they are being worked on fixing broken things and when the funds are available, routine prevented maintenance.

Where are the Carriers?

Of the U.S. Navy's five Areas of Responsibility (AOR) only the 5th Fleet has any carriers on station waiting for Obama's orders to support rebel Islamist extremest and Al Qaeda in Syria.
 

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What the hell is broken on the GW that it takes 6 months to fix in a foreign port? I am inclined to believe that some of this is posturing since its overhaul will be scrubbed if the 2014 sequestration stuff stays as is. "We can't cut the budget. We already have a carrier stranded overseas"
 

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What the hell is broken on the GW that it takes 6 months to fix in a foreign port? I am inclined to believe that some of this is posturing since its overhaul will be scrubbed if the 2014 sequestration stuff stays as is. "We can't cut the budget. We already have a carrier stranded overseas"
Tampons were clogging the black water piping and tanks !

I went to the same source that Global Security uses and I see that the Navy has scrubbed all mentioning that the carrier was stuck in Yokosuka with maintenance problems. But it does show the carrier made a one month shake down cruise to the whore houses in Brisbane Australia and returned to Yokosuka on 8-23-13.

The USS Washington is the forward deployed carrier for the 7th Fleet. It seems it spends most of it time in Yokosuka than on station in the 7th Fleet AOR.

Money is tight, it has been for four years now. There was a report to Congress that 23 % of the Navy's ships are unable to put to sea and fight because of the lack of maintenance.

Damn, the Navy sent one of it's new LCS's on it's first deployment and it left San Diego and it's Bofor 57 mm gun didn't even work. I read last month that it broke down some where in the South Western Pacific.

Pentagon admits: Navy's newest warship can't survive combat

Pentagon admits: Navy's newest warship can't survive combat ? RT USA
 

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Tampons were clogging the black water piping and tanks !

I went to the same source that Global Security uses and I see that the Navy has scrubbed all mentioning that the carrier was stuck in Yokosuka with maintenance problems. But it does show the carrier made a one month shake down cruise to the whore houses in Brisbane Australia and returned to Yokosuka on 8-23-13.

The USS Washington is the forward deployed carrier for the 7th Fleet. It seems it spends most of it time in Yokosuka than on station in the 7th Fleet AOR.

Money is tight, it has been for four years now. There was a report to Congress that 23 % of the Navy's ships are unable to put to sea and fight because of the lack of maintenance.

Damn, the Navy sent one of it's new LCS's on it's first deployment and it left San Diego and it's Bofor 57 mm gun didn't even work. I read last month that it broke down some where in the South Western Pacific.

Pentagon admits: Navy's newest warship can't survive combat

Pentagon admits: Navy's newest warship can't survive combat ? RT USA
I see your misogyny once more raises its ugly head. YOu really don't like women very much, do you? Especially when they get into those macho areas you are so fond of.
 

Fisher

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I see your misogyny once more raises its ugly head. YOu really don't like women very much, do you? Especially when they get into those macho areas you are so fond of.
sometimes a joke is just a joke. Not everything has to be a PC teachable moment or an opportunity to jump on another's character. Geez :tocktock2
 

APACHERAT

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I see your misogyny once more raises its ugly head. YOu really don't like women very much, do you? Especially when they get into those macho areas you are so fond of.
Good day Admiral Wiggen. :2wave:

Now any man who has ever owned a home with young ladies living in them have experienced tampons blocking the sewer lines.

And as the Navy has discovered, that American women are just not the best looking women in the world but the sweetest smelling women in the world. That when it comes to personal hygiene and when mother nature calls, American females use three times more water aboard ship than the smelly sailors of the opposite sex.
 

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What's even worse is the state of the US Calvary. Fewer horses than at any time in history, and Oat production is going more and more to Canada because of global warming.

Concerning. I wish some ex-enlisted men would make some noise about this impending military tragedy.
 

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Good day Admiral Wiggen. :2wave:

Now any man who has ever owned a home with young ladies living in them have experienced tampons blocking the sewer lines.

And as the Navy has discovered, that American women are just not the best looking women in the world but the sweetest smelling women in the world. That when it comes to personal hygiene and when mother nature calls, American females use three times more water aboard ship than the smelly sailors of the opposite sex.
God yes. I employ a lot of women/ When Roto Rooter came they said the main drain line from the building to the city sewage pipe was so packed full of tampons they were surprised anything had been getting through for months. Cost me a freaking fortune to have that thing cleaned out.
 

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Of the U.S. Navy's ten Nimitz class carriers, only two are at sea and both are in the 5th Fleet AOR.

The 7th Fleet AOR carrier CVN-73 Washington has been in port in Yokosuka, Japan since March of 2013 with maintenance problems. Ship still waiting for funding and spare parts.

Three carriers that are suppose to be "surge carriers" are in different stages of predeployment training and attending mandatory sensitivity training courses.

Four carriers are going no where, they are being worked on fixing broken things and when the funds are available, routine prevented maintenance.

Where are the Carriers?

Of the U.S. Navy's five Areas of Responsibility (AOR) only the 5th Fleet has any carriers on station waiting for Obama's orders to support rebel Islamist extremest and Al Qaeda in Syria.
Did you not get the memo, Obama wants to dismantle the military right under our noses and destroy America's power in the world.
 

APACHERAT

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Did you not get the memo, Obama wants to dismantle the military right under our noses and destroy America's power in the world.
Obama dismantling or "redefining the purpose and character of the U.S. military" is likely be the only thing that the Obama administration will be able to claim that wasn't a failure.
 

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What's even worse is the state of the US Calvary. Fewer horses than at any time in history, and Oat production is going more and more to Canada because of global warming.

Concerning. I wish some ex-enlisted men would make some noise about this impending military tragedy.
Before Obama’s disastrous Afghanistan surge cost 1,500 American lives and 15,000 wounded, before wars were won by “Hearts and Minds” and CVE, the War in Afghanistan was won by America’s horse soldiers.

Meet the Horse Soldiers Who Won the War in Afghanistan (VIDEO) | FrontPage Magazine
 

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APACHERAT

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I know. Just tragic that we don't have more. Afghanistan was going so well before Obama. A big win, to be sure.
I just saw yesterday that 75% of all the deaths of American soldiers in Afghanistan occurred during Obama's 4 1/2 years in the White House.

As soon as Obama forced PC Rules of Engagement upon our troops, the casualties of American troops sky rocketed. Something to do with winning the hearts and minds. Someone refused to look back to "Lessons Learned" in the past that if you grab them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow.
 

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I just saw yesterday that 75% of all the deaths of American soldiers in Afghanistan occurred during Obama's 4 1/2 years in the White House.

As soon as Obama forced PC Rules of Engagement upon our troops, the casualties of American troops sky rocketed. Something to do with winning the hearts and minds. Someone refused to look back to "Lessons Learned" in the past that if you grab them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow.
Yes. Damn the Geneva conventions.

Winning should have no rules. When you see afghan kids cooperating with the enemy, remember the immortal words of the great Calvary colonel John Chivington said, "Nits grow into lice".
 

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I found one. ;)

Navy’s Newest Aircraft Carrier at Newport News


Huntington Ingalls Industries says workers at Newport News Shipbuilding have installed four 30-ton bronze propellers on the USS Gerald R. Ford. At 21 feet in diameter, each propeller spins to push the aircraft carrier through the water.

Officials say work continues on piping and electrical systems and habitability areas such as the galley and mess spaces. Construction of the Ford began in November 2009. The ship’s christening is scheduled for Nov. 9.

The aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford, CVN 78, under construction since November 2009, sits in Dry Dock 12 at Newport News Shipbuilding before the flooding of the dry dock began. At 21 feet in diameter, each propeller spins to push the aircraft carrier through the water.

Navy
 

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The Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers (or Ford-class) are a class of supercarrier for the United States Navy, intended to eventually replace the current Nimitz-class carriers. The new vessels will use a hull design similar to the Nimitz carriers in appearance, but many aspects of the design will be different, implementing new technologies developed since the initial design of the previous class , as well as other design features intended to improve efficiency and running costs, including a reduced crew requirement. The first hull of the line will be named Gerald R. Ford, and will have the hull number CVN-78.

Displacement: 112.000 tons

Length: 1.092 ft (333 m)

Propulsion: 2 A1B nuclear reactors

Aircraft carried: 75+.....snip~


 

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Of the U.S. Navy's ten Nimitz class carriers, only two are at sea and both are in the 5th Fleet AOR.

The 7th Fleet AOR carrier CVN-73 Washington has been in port in Yokosuka, Japan since March of 2013 with maintenance problems. Ship still waiting for funding and spare parts.

Three carriers that are suppose to be "surge carriers" are in different stages of predeployment training and attending mandatory sensitivity training courses.

Four carriers are going no where, they are being worked on fixing broken things and when the funds are available, routine prevented maintenance.

Where are the Carriers?

Of the U.S. Navy's five Areas of Responsibility (AOR) only the 5th Fleet has any carriers on station waiting for Obama's orders to support rebel Islamist extremest and Al Qaeda in Syria.
The Lincoln is in because she is scheduled to be refueled. This has absolutely nothing to do with Obama. It is a necessary thing that comes up when nuclear powered aircraft carriers reach about 20+ years of age. The entire reason she was transferred to the east coast was to refuel her. When I was on her, she was a west coast ship.

But here is what is actually going on with our carriers:

USS Nimitz - on deployment, last update in the Red Sea
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower - in a planned maintenance period in Norfolk
USS Carl Vinson - here in San Diego, her home port because she isn't scheduled to be anywhere else
USS Theodore Roosevelt - just finished up with some ship qualifications last month, she is in her homeport because, like the Vinson, she isn't scheduled to be anywhere else
USS Abraham Lincoln - in refuel
USS George Washington - left Japan last month to do a WestPac, still on it
USS John C. Stennis - in a planned maintenance period
USS Harry S. Truman - just left the Persian Gulf
USS Ronald Reagan - in port now, but was doing training off our coast just last month
USS George H.W. Bush - looks like she has been doing her workups to going out, likely next year some time

http://www.gonavy.jp/CVLocation.html

Here is the thing, the carriers on a schedule, although it is allowed some flexibility if needed. And these schedules are decided years ahead of time, even longer when it comes to things like refueling. This is especially true when we aren't needed, like now. It is a good thing. It means the sailors aboard those ships actually get a little time home with their families instead of being on hot schedules where they are going out to sea 3/4 of a two year period. This is very little different than when I first got aboard the Lincoln. Personally, as a former carrier sailor, I am happy that the sailors aboard those carriers aren't being overloaded because some want them all out to sea or a large portion out to sea just to show force. They get to spend some time with their families and at home. Many of the senior sailors aboard these ships were out on some of the longest deployments since Vietnam due to their likely rotations. I know because had I not gotten off active duty in 2008, it is highly likely that I would be on one of these ships right now, since it is the only type of ship my rating and gender allows me on.
 

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The Lincoln is in because she is scheduled to be refueled. This has absolutely nothing to do with Obama. It is a necessary thing that comes up when nuclear powered aircraft carriers reach about 20+ years of age. The entire reason she was transferred to the east coast was to refuel her. When I was on her, she was a west coast ship.

But here is what is actually going on with our carriers:

USS Nimitz - on deployment, last update in the Red Sea
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower - in a planned maintenance period in Norfolk
USS Carl Vinson - here in San Diego, her home port because she isn't scheduled to be anywhere else
USS Theodore Roosevelt - just finished up with some ship qualifications last month, she is in her homeport because, like the Vinson, she isn't scheduled to be anywhere else
USS Abraham Lincoln - in refuel
USS George Washington - left Japan last month to do a WestPac, still on it
USS John C. Stennis - in a planned maintenance period
USS Harry S. Truman - just left the Persian Gulf
USS Ronald Reagan - in port now, but was doing training off our coast just last month
USS George H.W. Bush - looks like she has been doing her workups to going out, likely next year some time

CV Locations

Here is the thing, the carriers on a schedule, although it is allowed some flexibility if needed. And these schedules are decided years ahead of time, even longer when it comes to things like refueling. This is especially true when we aren't needed, like now. It is a good thing. It means the sailors aboard those ships actually get a little time home with their families instead of being on hot schedules where they are going out to sea 3/4 of a two year period. This is very little different than when I first got aboard the Lincoln. Personally, as a former carrier sailor, I am happy that the sailors aboard those carriers aren't being overloaded because some want them all out to sea or a large portion out to sea just to show force. They get to spend some time with their families and at home. Many of the senior sailors aboard these ships were out on some of the longest deployments since Vietnam due to their likely rotations. I know because had I not gotten off active duty in 2008, it is highly likely that I would be on one of these ships right now, since it is the only type of ship my rating and gender allows me on.
So how many does that leave out there? Moreover.....its not just the carriers now is it. What about their escorts? Tend to go where they go.....correct?
 

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So how many does that leave out there? Moreover.....its not just the carriers now is it. What about their escorts? Tend to go where they go.....correct?
Actually, it means at the moment there are two carriers out there and another is on its way out to the Gulf to relieve one or both of those there now. This really isn't different than what it was like pre-9/11, when I first got to the ship. 4 carriers are completely operational and just doing workups or training or other ops off our own coast when they are out to sea (which doesn't have to be all the time). 3 are in major maintenance periods, which is strange, but also scheduled and not surprising since many of these ships have been doing some serious operational duties since 9/11.

Heck, during my 4 1/2 years on the Lincoln, we were out on a six month when the Cole got hit, meaning we got very little time inports until the way home. Then we did 9 1/2 months for the beginning of Iraqi Freedom. Then, on the way home from our first surge, right after I flew off the ship, she was extended for at least a month to help with tsunami relief because she was really close when Indonesia got hit in Dec 2004. They were supposed to do 4 months, and did at least 5 out to sea. None of these major underways include going back and forth out to sea for training and workups or RimPacs or trips up to Alaska or to Canada or down to allow an airwing to qualify/do runs off our deck or to just do an ORSE or some other required ship's exam.
 

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Actually, it means at the moment there are two carriers out there and another is on its way out to the Gulf to relieve one or both of those there now. This really isn't different than what it was like pre-9/11, when I first got to the ship. 4 carriers are completely operational and just doing workups or training or other ops off our own coast when they are out to sea (which doesn't have to be all the time). 3 are in major maintenance periods, which is strange, but also scheduled and not surprising since many of these ships have been doing some serious operational duties since 9/11.

Heck, during my 4 1/2 years on the Lincoln, we were out on a six month when the Cole got hit, meaning we got very little time inports until the way home. Then we did 9 1/2 months for the beginning of Iraqi Freedom. Then, on the way home from our first surge, right after I flew off the ship, she was extended for at least a month to help with tsunami relief because she was really close when Indonesia got hit in Dec 2004. They were supposed to do 4 months, and did at least 5 out to sea. None of these major underways include going back and forth out to sea for training and workups or RimPacs or trips up to Alaska or to Canada or down to allow an airwing to qualify/do runs off our deck or to just do an ORSE or some other required ship's exam.
Weren't they switching out fueling systems and mechanics and going with an Alternative fuel? For the 3 that have been in major maintenance? Or any scheduled to switch over to Ford Class?
 

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Weren't they switching out fueling systems and mechanics and going with an Alternative fuel? For the 3 that have been in major maintenance? Or any scheduled to switch over to Ford Class?
No. Our carriers are sticking with nuclear fuel (unless you are talking something else). The Ford is being fitted with more efficient propulsion (can't get in detail really) and electromagnetic catapults rather than steam catapults. This means a difference in how the power is used, but not which source is used ultimately to make that power. The Lincoln is simply being refueled (they are only loaded with so much when they are built, about 20 years or so worth). The other two are not having their fuel touched. They simply have to be fixed and have planned preventive maintenance done.

Now, there have been rumors of the Navy considering going back to nuclear powered cruisers, but I'm not sure it is likely without some serious cost/benefit analysis.
 

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No. Our carriers are sticking with nuclear fuel (unless you are talking something else). The Ford is being fitted with more efficient propulsion (can't get in detail really) and electromagnetic catapults rather than steam catapults. This means a difference in how the power is used, but not which source is used ultimately to make that power. The Lincoln is simply being refueled (they are only loaded with so much when they are built, about 20 years or so worth). The other two are not having their fuel touched. They simply have to be fixed and have planned preventive maintenance done.

Now, there have been rumors of the Navy considering going back to nuclear powered cruisers, but I'm not sure it is likely without some serious cost/benefit analysis.


I see
......I was looking more along the lines with these.

Navy Adopts Hybrid-Electric Amphibious Assault Ships.....



The U.S. Navy is incorporating fuel-efficient hybrid-electric propulsion technology onto several of its next-generation big-deck amphibious assault ships, the service’s top civilian said.

The USS America (LHA-6) and the USS Tripoli (LHA-7) are part of what the Navy calls its now-in-development America-class amphibious assault ships designed with, among other things, a larger deck space to increase the ability to transport and utilized air assets, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus told an audience May 21 at the 2013 Energy Efficiency Global Forum, Washington, D.C. The ships are being engineered with a hybrid-drive propulsion system, meaning the ships can use diesel-electric propulsion as well as gas-turbine engines.

When asked about the service’s broader initiative to power ships and planes with alternative fuels, known as the “Great Green Fleet,” Mabus emphasized that “now is the time to do it.” The effort has drawn criticism from lawmakers such as Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., who say it’s not worth the added cost.

Hybrid-electric propulsion systems use a gas turbine engine as well as an electric motor and diesel generator. The electric motors can help propel the ship at speeds up to around 12 knots and the generator can help produce electricity for the ship. When it comes to traveling at speeds greater than 12 knots or so, the ship can then rely upon its gas-turbine engine. At the same time, the generators can provide on-board power for many of the ships systems such as sensors, weapons and other electronics, Navy officials indicated.

The hybrid-drive allows the ship to propel itself using either electric drives or a traditional gas turbine engine. Electric propulsion and on-board electrical power generation are both integrated through what’s called a main reduction gear (MRG), a portion of the ship’s propulsion system which helps convert energy into the revolutions needed for the propellers to move the ship through the water, according to Navy officials.

“This unique auxiliary propulsion system (APS) is designed with fuel efficiency in mind. The APS uses two induction-type auxiliary propulsion motors (APM) powered from the ship’s electrical grid instead of using main propulsion engines to power the ship’s shaft. Instead of using its gas turbines which are less efficient at lower speeds, the ship will be able to use its APS for roughly 75 percent of the time the ship is underway,” a Navy official said.....snip~

http://www.dodbuzz.com/2013/05/21/navy-developing-hybrid-electric-amphibious-assault-ships/
 

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I see
......I was looking more along the lines with these.

Navy Adopts Hybrid-Electric Amphibious Assault Ships.....



The U.S. Navy is incorporating fuel-efficient hybrid-electric propulsion technology onto several of its next-generation big-deck amphibious assault ships, the service’s top civilian said.

The USS America (LHA-6) and the USS Tripoli (LHA-7) are part of what the Navy calls its now-in-development America-class amphibious assault ships designed with, among other things, a larger deck space to increase the ability to transport and utilized air assets, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus told an audience May 21 at the 2013 Energy Efficiency Global Forum, Washington, D.C. The ships are being engineered with a hybrid-drive propulsion system, meaning the ships can use diesel-electric propulsion as well as gas-turbine engines.

When asked about the service’s broader initiative to power ships and planes with alternative fuels, known as the “Great Green Fleet,” Mabus emphasized that “now is the time to do it.” The effort has drawn criticism from lawmakers such as Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., who say it’s not worth the added cost.

Hybrid-electric propulsion systems use a gas turbine engine as well as an electric motor and diesel generator. The electric motors can help propel the ship at speeds up to around 12 knots and the generator can help produce electricity for the ship. When it comes to traveling at speeds greater than 12 knots or so, the ship can then rely upon its gas-turbine engine. At the same time, the generators can provide on-board power for many of the ships systems such as sensors, weapons and other electronics, Navy officials indicated.

The hybrid-drive allows the ship to propel itself using either electric drives or a traditional gas turbine engine. Electric propulsion and on-board electrical power generation are both integrated through what’s called a main reduction gear (MRG), a portion of the ship’s propulsion system which helps convert energy into the revolutions needed for the propellers to move the ship through the water, according to Navy officials.

“This unique auxiliary propulsion system (APS) is designed with fuel efficiency in mind. The APS uses two induction-type auxiliary propulsion motors (APM) powered from the ship’s electrical grid instead of using main propulsion engines to power the ship’s shaft. Instead of using its gas turbines which are less efficient at lower speeds, the ship will be able to use its APS for roughly 75 percent of the time the ship is underway,” a Navy official said.....snip~

http://www.dodbuzz.com/2013/05/21/navy-developing-hybrid-electric-amphibious-assault-ships/
Electric power still has to be produced aboard a ship though. You can't store it on a battery big enough (yet) to operate a ship for long. You still have to have some sort of fuel to run the turbines, whether it is to propel the ship or make electrical power. If we could set up solar power for ships that would be awesome but I don't know if that can work while it is moving. (Plus, we have a hard enough time getting qualified personnel in place to operate nuclear power, I can imagine it would be even tougher to maintain solar panels aboard a ship, not to mention the problem when it comes to wartime operations.) It sounds like they are switching from using a gas powered ship to basically using a diesel generator to make power to operate the engines, with the gas-turbines as a backup. (I don't know a lot about the non-nuke propulsion ships. I'm used to nuclear reaction heats water, water heats other water to steam, steam is used in turbines to propel ship and make electrical power, and prior to the Ford, shoot planes off the deck. I know some of them operate with a steam cycle, just a different heat source, just not sure which ones.)
 

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Electric power still has to be produced aboard a ship though. You can't store it on a battery big enough (yet) to operate a ship for long. You still have to have some sort of fuel to run the turbines, whether it is to propel the ship or make electrical power. If we could set up solar power for ships that would be awesome but I don't know if that can work while it is moving. (Plus, we have a hard enough time getting qualified personnel in place to operate nuclear power, I can imagine it would be even tougher to maintain solar panels aboard a ship, not to mention the problem when it comes to wartime operations.) It sounds like they are switching from using a gas powered ship to basically using a diesel generator to make power to operate the engines, with the gas-turbines as a backup. (I don't know a lot about the non-nuke propulsion ships. I'm used to nuclear reaction heats water, water heats other water to steam, steam is used in turbines to propel ship and make electrical power, and prior to the Ford, shoot planes off the deck. I know some of them operate with a steam cycle, just a different heat source, just not sure which ones.)
They have started.....with the solar and the fuels. Mabus moved forward on it. Plus the Navy closed its last Coal Plant too.

US Navy Opens First Solar EV Charging Station Opens, Closes Last Coal Power Plant.....



The Navy got its first ever solar powered electric vehicle charging station last week, and though it’s a drop in the bucket compared to the Navy’s overall fuel consumption it is yet another demonstration of a slow but steady transition out of petroleum dependency by the US military. The news also comes as the Navy gives coal the heave-ho, moving forward with a contract to replace a 1950′s era coal fired power plant at its Indian Head, Maryland base, which is the very last coal power plant located at a Navy facility in the US.

Solar EV chargers are still a rarity at military facilities, though, and the Navy chose carefully when it picked a site to publicize its first ever solar EV charging station.

The charging station consists of a 150-foot long carport structure, located at Naval Support Activity Mid-South in Millington, Tennessee, which seems to be an ideal ambassador for introducing new technology to both military and civilian sectors. The base serves as the Navy’s Human Resources Center for Excellence and it is intimately tied to its surrounding community as one of Tennessee’s single largest employers with a workforce of more than 7,500 including civilians and contractors.

Navy Drifts Away From Petroleum

The Navy’s biofuel initiatives have been the big attention-getters, but the Navy is also moving forward on other alternative fuel fronts. Mid-South is actually just one of a total of nine Navy sites that are getting solar carports under the same $10 million contract, which also includes E85 fueling stations.

In addition, the Navy is getting $600,000 worth of charging stations at other facilities from the veteran-owned company OpConnect. The stations will be sited at the Navy’s retail stores through the Navy Exchange Service Command.

The Navy is also heavily invested in alternative energy research, including microbial fuel cells, advanced photovoltaics, and wave power.....snip~

US Navy Renewable Energy News | The Energy Collective
 

roguenuke

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They have started.....with the solar and the fuels. Mabus moved forward on it. Plus the Navy closed its last Coal Plant too.

US Navy Opens First Solar EV Charging Station Opens, Closes Last Coal Power Plant.....



The Navy got its first ever solar powered electric vehicle charging station last week, and though it’s a drop in the bucket compared to the Navy’s overall fuel consumption it is yet another demonstration of a slow but steady transition out of petroleum dependency by the US military. The news also comes as the Navy gives coal the heave-ho, moving forward with a contract to replace a 1950′s era coal fired power plant at its Indian Head, Maryland base, which is the very last coal power plant located at a Navy facility in the US.

Solar EV chargers are still a rarity at military facilities, though, and the Navy chose carefully when it picked a site to publicize its first ever solar EV charging station.

The charging station consists of a 150-foot long carport structure, located at Naval Support Activity Mid-South in Millington, Tennessee, which seems to be an ideal ambassador for introducing new technology to both military and civilian sectors. The base serves as the Navy’s Human Resources Center for Excellence and it is intimately tied to its surrounding community as one of Tennessee’s single largest employers with a workforce of more than 7,500 including civilians and contractors.

Navy Drifts Away From Petroleum

The Navy’s biofuel initiatives have been the big attention-getters, but the Navy is also moving forward on other alternative fuel fronts. Mid-South is actually just one of a total of nine Navy sites that are getting solar carports under the same $10 million contract, which also includes E85 fueling stations.

In addition, the Navy is getting $600,000 worth of charging stations at other facilities from the veteran-owned company OpConnect. The stations will be sited at the Navy’s retail stores through the Navy Exchange Service Command.

The Navy is also heavily invested in alternative energy research, including microbial fuel cells, advanced photovoltaics, and wave power.....snip~

US Navy Renewable Energy News | The Energy Collective
That's awesome! Some Navy bases have been using solar power for things like outside lights and to power other facilities for at least 15 years now. The first time we pulled the Lincoln into Coronado while I was onboard, I noticed the parking areas all had solar panels on the coverings and there were some over the streetlamps.
 
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