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VerneerStone - Anybody used it?

countryboy

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That's pretty. Fine for a fp. But I would have doubts it would hold up on an exterior. But I don't know.

Have you searched Youtube to see if there are any contractor videos on it?
Manufactured stone holds up fine in exterior applications. This stuff appears to have a 75 year warranty.
 

humbolt

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Be certain to adequately prepare the surface to which you are applying the stone or brick. Be aware that while this stuff is lighter than the real thing, it does add significant weight which could be a structural concern with regard to certain interior applications - like the fireplace shown in the literature. If, for example, that fireplace is on a second floor - whether the first is a basement or the ground floor - be sure the structural elements will support the additional load of the applied stone or brick.
 

countryboy

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Be certain to adequately prepare the surface to which you are applying the stone or brick. Be aware that while this stuff is lighter than the real thing, it does add significant weight which could be a structural concern with regard to certain interior applications - like the fireplace shown in the literature. If, for example, that fireplace is on a second floor - whether the first is a basement or the ground floor - be sure the structural elements will support the additional load of the applied stone or brick.

Good advice. And always always always, follow the manufacturer's installation instructions to the letter.
 

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I'm just doing about 15 square feet above a fireplace mantel.
All in all I don't think it's going to be more than about 100 pounds of stone.

It'll obviously be indoors and not subjected to weather, although this stuff is basically concrete that's poured into molds to look like
real stone. It would surely handle being exposed to outside elements without issue.

I'll know more once I actually get the "stone" but for now I just wanted to see if anyone had used it before.

Flat wall with no corners. It's purely for aesthetic purposes. An accent above the existing brick fireplace.

Home Depot sells the stuff, but most stores don't carry it in stock other than a simple display.
 

humbolt

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I'm just doing about 15 square feet above a fireplace mantel.
All in all I don't think it's going to be more than about 100 pounds of stone.

It'll obviously be indoors and not subjected to weather, although this stuff is basically concrete that's poured into molds to look like
real stone. It would surely handle being exposed to outside elements without issue.

I'll know more once I actually get the "stone" but for now I just wanted to see if anyone had used it before.

Flat wall with no corners. It's purely for aesthetic purposes. An accent above the existing brick fireplace.

Home Depot sells the stuff, but most stores don't carry it in stock other than a simple display.

It's easy to cut. I've put in more of that stuff and real stone than I care to think about.
 

Dragonfly

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It's easy to cut. I've put in more of that stuff and real stone than I care to think about.

Cut how? I don't have a wet saw. Can I use a concrete blade in a circular saw? Score it deep and then break it the rest of the way.
 

humbolt

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Cut how? I don't have a wet saw. Can I use a concrete blade in a circular saw? Score it deep and then break it the rest of the way.

Yes, you can use the circular saw. No need for a wet saw. It'll be a little dusty. Okay. It'll be real dusty. Wear a mask. You'll love it.
 

humbolt

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I should add that if you want to or need to avoid the cut look, score it from the back side just enough to ensure a break that will look more natural.
 

countryboy

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Cut how? I don't have a wet saw. Can I use a concrete blade in a circular saw? Score it deep and then break it the rest of the way.
It'd be easier to cut with an angle grinder and a 4 1/2" diamond blade. You could pick up a cheapie at harbor freight.

Depending on what style of stone you're using, and the area you're installing it in, you may not even need to make any cuts.
 
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