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UK Automobile question?

EMNofSeattle

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So I became curious about this for no reason at all the other night,

I drive a manual transmission vehicle. obviously a left hand drive because we drive on the right side of the road.

so the outboard pedal closest to the door is the clutch, middle brake and inboard is accelerator.

so on a Right hand drive vehicle, is this reversed? as in, is the left most pedal still the clutch? or is it the right hand pedal? which I guess would be the outboard pedal on a RHD vehicle.
 

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So I became curious about this for no reason at all the other night,

I drive a manual transmission vehicle. obviously a left hand drive because we drive on the right side of the road.

so the outboard pedal closest to the door is the clutch, middle brake and inboard is accelerator.

so on a Right hand drive vehicle, is this reversed? as in, is the left most pedal still the clutch? or is it the right hand pedal? which I guess would be the outboard pedal on a RHD vehicle.

The Left most is the clutch, middle brake and right acceleration

In other words it's the same as well as the shift pattern being the exact same.
 

Grand Mal

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The Left most is the clutch, middle brake and right acceleration

In other words it's the same as well as the shift pattern being the exact same.

I learned to ride on British bikes and when I bought a Japanese crotch-rocket I spent two weeks trying to shift gears with the brake pedal!
 

EMNofSeattle

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I learned to ride on British bikes and when I bought a Japanese crotch-rocket I spent two weeks trying to shift gears with the brake pedal!

you ride a crotch rocket?

I'm scared of those.
 

Manc Skipper

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I learned to ride on British bikes and when I bought a Japanese crotch-rocket I spent two weeks trying to shift gears with the brake pedal!

Those early Japanese machines didn't rattle, drop oil and break down every twenty miles, they were a wonderment!
The first of the "maxi" scooters, The Honda Helix/Fusion/CN250 had a footpedal rear brake like the smaller Vespas and Lambrettas but not the left-hand gearchange, where the clutch lever swivelled on the handlebar!
I think the car pedal arrangement has something to do with most people being right-side dominant, and the clutch is only used when gear-changing, whereas the other pedals are used to go either faster or slower.
(I might have made that bit up!)
Another possibility could be that one early manufacturer settled on that layout, and the others gradually followed...
 

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I learned to ride on British bikes and when I bought a Japanese crotch-rocket I spent two weeks trying to shift gears with the brake pedal!

I had a similar experience. It's a little maddening until you become accustomed to it. I also had a difficult time at first shifting a manual transmission with my left hand on right hand drive cars. Seems like it would be a simple thing, but it didn't work out well initially.
 

Grand Mal

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EMNofSeattle

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Years ago, when I was immortal.
I actually survived being immortal. Many don't.

I hear ya

but now my job is driving 18 wheelers, so my days of carefree driving are over lest I become "uninsurable"

but yes, I've driven a 53 trailer loaded stem to stern with explosives before and didn't blink, maunvered a 48 foot trailer through the densest parts of downtown Seattle on surface streets during the afternoon rush but I'm terrified of motorcycles.
 

EMNofSeattle

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Those early Japanese machines didn't rattle, drop oil and break down every twenty miles, they were a wonderment!
The first of the "maxi" scooters, The Honda Helix/Fusion/CN250 had a footpedal rear brake like the smaller Vespas and Lambrettas but not the left-hand gearchange, where the clutch lever swivelled on the handlebar!
I think the car pedal arrangement has something to do with most people being right-side dominant, and the clutch is only used when gear-changing, whereas the other pedals are used to go either faster or slower.
(I might have made that bit up!)
Another possibility could be that one early manufacturer settled on that layout, and the others gradually followed...

I had always assumed placement of clutch and accelerator on early cars was because it is easier to coordinate a movement between opposite sides of the body (left foot clutch, right hand shift) It would seem ackward to left hand shift left foot clutch, although I suppose that's only a matter of perception.
 

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So I became curious about this for no reason at all the other night,

I drive a manual transmission vehicle. obviously a left hand drive because we drive on the right side of the road.

so the outboard pedal closest to the door is the clutch, middle brake and inboard is accelerator.

so on a Right hand drive vehicle, is this reversed? as in, is the left most pedal still the clutch? or is it the right hand pedal? which I guess would be the outboard pedal on a RHD vehicle.

Pedals are the same as in LHD cars.

Interestingly, it was the British Austin 7 that was the first mass produced car to use what became the conventional layout - Clutch, Brake, Gas. Cadillac used this layout first, but back in the 1910's, Cadillacs were not considered mass produced cars. Until this layout became popular, car manufacturers used whatever layout they wanted. Try driving a Model T without instruction.
 

Grand Mal

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I hear ya

but now my job is driving 18 wheelers, so my days of carefree driving are over lest I become "uninsurable"

but yes, I've driven a 53 trailer loaded stem to stern with explosives before and didn't blink, maunvered a 48 foot trailer through the densest parts of downtown Seattle on surface streets during the afternoon rush but I'm terrified of motorcycles.

Coincidentally, one of my worst days on a motorcycle was coming through Seattle, northbound on I-5 during the afternoon rush in a driving rainstorm. You coulda bought that bike for $10 and a ride to the border! The freeway traffic patterns in the best of times were intimidating to a country hick like I was.
 

EMNofSeattle

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Coincidentally, one of my worst days on a motorcycle was coming through Seattle, northbound on I-5 during the afternoon rush in a driving rainstorm. You coulda bought that bike for $10 and a ride to the border! The freeway traffic patterns in the best of times were intimidating to a country hick like I was.

The Seattle urban core is where the problem comes. perhaps the only city I've been to that has a worse freeway set up is Portland. way too many off-on ramps in the speed lane. that and the system of ramps to downtown seattle is fairly challenging for someone who's not used to the set-up.

I've delivered to Vancouver BC before by semi-truck, I was pleasantly surprised, I had always assumed that place would be "Seattle North" but at least the road network was easy for me to use as a newcomer...

I grew up in a semi-rural community, across puget sound from Seattle. 4 miles and one county line away, a world apart....
 

Grand Mal

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The Seattle urban core is where the problem comes. perhaps the only city I've been to that has a worse freeway set up is Portland. way too many off-on ramps in the speed lane. that and the system of ramps to downtown seattle is fairly challenging for someone who's not used to the set-up.

I've delivered to Vancouver BC before by semi-truck, I was pleasantly surprised, I had always assumed that place would be "Seattle North" but at least the road network was easy for me to use as a newcomer...

I grew up in a semi-rural community, across puget sound from Seattle. 4 miles and one county line away, a world apart....

Those left-lane on-off ramps did it for me. Besides being an unexpected hazard, they seem to double the jockeying-for-position lane changes during the rush.
Come to think of it, they probably help reduce the volume because people like me are careful to plan ahead so we're not in the rush.
 

EMNofSeattle

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Those left-lane on-off ramps did it for me. Besides being an unexpected hazard, they seem to double the jockeying-for-position lane changes during the rush.
Come to think of it, they probably help reduce the volume because people like me are careful to plan ahead so we're not in the rush.

I agree, especially in North Seattle where the reversible express lanes end, because in the evening rush all the trucks that took the express lanes are merging at 25-30 mph and the set-up dumps them in the speed lane causing the more aggressive drivers to pull right in front of the slower ones
 

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So I became curious about this for no reason at all the other night,

I drive a manual transmission vehicle. obviously a left hand drive because we drive on the right side of the road.

so the outboard pedal closest to the door is the clutch, middle brake and inboard is accelerator.

so on a Right hand drive vehicle, is this reversed? as in, is the left most pedal still the clutch? or is it the right hand pedal? which I guess would be the outboard pedal on a RHD vehicle.

It has been the same in most european american and japanese vihicles I have driven, excluding which side the wheel is on. The odd one was when I was in afghanistan, we had toyota hiluxes that were right side steering wheel. Some shifted left to right, some shifted right to left, depending on which country the came from, but all had the same gas brake clutch setup.
 

beerftw

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Pedals are the same as in LHD cars.

Interestingly, it was the British Austin 7 that was the first mass produced car to use what became the conventional layout - Clutch, Brake, Gas. Cadillac used this layout first, but back in the 1910's, Cadillacs were not considered mass produced cars. Until this layout became popular, car manufacturers used whatever layout they wanted. Try driving a Model T without instruction.

I have and they are a pain, most model t's I have driven were t buckets, so they were nothing like original, but every one in a while, or decade perhaps, someone comes to me with an original they found in a barn somewhere they want fixed.

They have manual transmissions that are designed like modern automatics, instead of synchros and shift forks, they use bands, drums and clutch packs, and planetary gear sets. Unlike modern automatics, there was nothing automatic about them, they had multiple levers and the driver needed to know which band came on when for each gear, meaning they had to manually control each shift element precisely.
 

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I have and they are a pain, most model t's I have driven were t buckets, so they were nothing like original, but every one in a while, or decade perhaps, someone comes to me with an original they found in a barn somewhere they want fixed.

They have manual transmissions that are designed like modern automatics, instead of synchros and shift forks, they use bands, drums and clutch packs, and planetary gear sets. Unlike modern automatics, there was nothing automatic about them, they had multiple levers and the driver needed to know which band came on when for each gear, meaning they had to manually control each shift element precisely.

Yes indeed. And then there is the issue of throttle control. First timers are always looking down at the pedals, rather than understanding throttle control is done by the stalk on the right side of the steering column.

When manufacturers wised up, they realized a universal layout would allow more people to drive, without the sometimes strange and unique ways each had been approaching it.

Now only if Microsoft could apply the same logic when they offer the lastest versions of Windows....
 
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