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Turkey condemns house panel endorsement of Armenian 'genocide' resolution

kaya'08

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The Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday endorsed a resolution calling for Washington’s recognition of World War I-era killings of Armenians during the last days of the Ottoman Empire as “genocide.”

23 of the panel’s 46 members voted for the resolution and 22 voted against it while one committee member declined to cast a vote.

The move may jeopardize Turkey’s ties with both the United States and Armenia.

Turkey condemned US congressional vote labeling the 1915 killings of Armenians as “genocide” and recalled its ambassador to Washington for consultations.

“We condemn this resolution accusing Turkey of a crime that it has not committed,” the Turkish Prime Ministry said in a written statement.

“Our Ambassador to Washington Namık Tan was recalled tonight to Ankara for consultations after the development,” said the statement, which came immediately after the US panel passed the measure in a closer-than-expected vote.

In Washington, Turkish lobbying deputies pushed against the resolution until the very last moment. Speaking to Turkish television channel NTV, opposition Republican People’s Party deputy Şükrü Elekdağ said, “The US administration has left Turkey alone.”

Suat Kınıklıoğlu of the ruling Justice and Development Party said the supporters of the measure did not expect such a close vote, claiming the outcome taught them a lesson.

Turkey condemns house panel endorsement of Armenian 'genocide' resolution - Hurriyet Daily News and Economic Review

So, does it have to pass Nancy Pelosi to be officially put in force? :confused:
 

Orion

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Who cares what the U.S. thinks. I'd rather hear it from the UN under an international consensus.
 

Oftencold

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Who cares what the U.S. thinks. I'd rather hear it from the UN under an international consensus.

Why not leprechauns and unicorns? They at least would be more realistic than an "international consensus," whatever that is, and less mythical than the "United" Nations.
 

Ikari

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Who cares what the U.S. thinks. I'd rather hear it from the UN under an international consensus.

Why are we bitching about WW I **** still?
 

Oftencold

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Why are we bitching about WW I **** still?

Because most people here refuse to discuss the United States' culpability the War of Northern Aggression. I'm working on that though.


Seriously though, in most of the world, the events of wars centuries past are still modern concerns. The idea of not perpetuating the conflicts of recent generations is a Western, and especially an American norm.
 
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Orion

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Because most people here refuse to discuss the United States' culpability the War of Northern Aggression. I'm working on that though.


Seriously though, in most of the world, the events of wars centuries past are still modern concerns. The idea of not perpetuating the conflicts of recent generations is a Western, and especially an American norm.

Then maybe we should stop causing wars and start reconciling them. It would make the attempts at reconciliation seem a lot more genuine.
 

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Because it's still relevant today...

Is it? Are we condemning Germany, Italy, or Japan for anything? Or is it just Turkey for some reason? Cause something that happened nearly 100 years ago and hasn't been repeated doesn't sound like something that is still relevant.
 

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Is it? Are we condemning Germany, Italy, or Japan for anything? Or is it just Turkey for some reason? Cause something that happened nearly 100 years ago and hasn't been repeated doesn't sound like something that is still relevant.

I disagree. History is always important.
 

Ikari

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I disagree. History is always important.

So do you think we should similarly condemn Germany, Italy, and Japan then? In the same manner we've done to Turkey? How far back are we going with this too? The British Empire? Cause don't think those guys weren't wiping folk off the map. Should we condemn ourselves for the treatment of the American Indian? Why is it that we are doing this to just Turkey now? You not find it suspect?

History is important, and we should learn from mistakes made in the past. But there's not point in trying to hold people responsible now for something which happened almost 100 years ago.
 

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So do you think we should similarly condemn Germany, Italy, and Japan then? In the same manner we've done to Turkey? How far back are we going with this too? The British Empire? Cause don't think those guys weren't wiping folk off the map. Should we condemn ourselves for the treatment of the American Indian? Why is it that we are doing this to just Turkey now? You not find it suspect?

History is important, and we should learn from mistakes made in the past. But there's not point in trying to hold people responsible now for something which happened almost 100 years ago.

Yes, if wrong was done, we should recognize it, learn from it, and mourn for it. I am not saying there should be punishment, because you are right that those things are in the past and those who did those things are dead.

It would be far better if those countries who were involved in the events did it themselves though.
 
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Ikari

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Yes, if wrong was done, we should recognize it, learn from it, and mourn for it. I am not saying there should be punishment, because you are right that those things are in the past and those who did those things are dead.

It would be far better if those countries who were involved in the events did it themselves though.

It would be nice. But so long as the behavior isn't repeated then it's not going to be a problem either way.

To me, the timing of this is very suspicious. Because we've had almost 100 years to issue this; but we didn't until now. Why? I think it has way more to do with Turkey's desire to enter the EU than anything else.
 
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Ikari said:

I know you saw my post in the other thread, but I'm going to post it here anyways:

Me said:
This is the second place I've seen you post this. The reason that it is signifcant today is because the issue of the Armenians is a very touchy issue even to this day.

As an analogy, you might consider the internment of Japanese during WW2 as "in the past," as do most people. But do you really think that would be the case if Japanese were still treated as second class citizens and widely discriminated against?

The reason that this is still a relevant issue is because the tensions that caused the genocide still exist today.

Are we condemning Germany

Are Jews treated as second class citizens or widely discriminated against in Germany today?

or Japan for anything?

Japan was recently condemned for historical revisionism regarding its role in WW2 by omitting the Japanese treatment of Chinese civilians during WW2 from textbooks, so yes.
 
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Ikari

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Japan was recently condemned for historical revisionism regarding its role in WW2 by omitting the Japanese treatment of Chinese civilians during WW2, so yes.

What about before WW II? The Japanese and the Chinese warred for longer than just WW II. Japan did horrible things to China, and vice versa for decades before...centuries perhaps. Ever since they were able to get to each other's land they've been fighting. So you got one part of the larger war. And not even. We condemned their revisionism, we didn't condemn them; not in the same way we're going after Turkey. How many other people have committed horrible acts against other people? What about all the crap that goes on in Africa even to this day? What about the Spanish Inquisition? Should we condemn the Catholic Church for the Crusades?

100 years they had to come out against Turkey. But we didn't. It's not until now that we do it, and it's only against Turkey for something which happened under the Ottoman Empire. Why?
 

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It would be nice. But so long as the behavior isn't repeated then it's not going to be a problem either way.

To me, the timing of this is very suspicious. Because we've had almost 100 years to issue this; but we didn't until now. Why? I think it has way more to do with Turkey's desire to enter the EU than anything else.

It looks like its been ramping up over the last 20 years or so, according to google timeline.



2007 Congress Mulls Resolution on Armenian 'Genocide' : NPR
2003 http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we...page=10&p_sort=YMD_date:D&s_trackval=GooglePM
2005 Sen. Allen Calls for US Recognition of Armenian Genocide | Asbarez Armenian News
 

Ikari

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Ok, well that's a little better. Still, none of this seems like it will functionally do anything. Which is something I'd then call useless and pointless.
 

tacomancer

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Ok, well that's a little better. Still, none of this seems like it will functionally do anything. Which is something I'd then call useless and pointless.

I agree. They either need to do it or don't and this is something that is better left up to historians anyway.
 

Ikari

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I agree. They either need to do it or don't and this is something that is better left up to historians anyway.

I can buy that. People are capable of doing some horrible things, and we certainly need to be able to learn and grow as a species from that. But we should do so in meaningful and functionally viable ways. But given human history, I'm not so sure we're ever truly going to learn. It seems that if there's one thing we humans love, it's killing other humans.
 

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I can buy that. People are capable of doing some horrible things, and we certainly need to be able to learn and grow as a species from that. But we should do so in meaningful and functionally viable ways. But given human history, I'm not so sure we're ever truly going to learn. It seems that if there's one thing we humans love, it's killing other humans.

I don't think we ever will, at least not until humans change and we become less greedy and selfish.
 
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Ikari said:
100 years they had to come out against Turkey. But we didn't. It's not until now that we do it, and it's only against Turkey for something whichhappened under the Ottoman Empire. Why?

What the hell do you mean "not until now"? It's been an issue since it happened. And I already explained why it is still a relevant issue today, which you never responded to.
 

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I agree that this has something to do with Turkey joining the EU. The timing is just odd, even given the historical debate on it.

The people of modern Turkey should not have to suffer condemnation for what was done 100 years ago, no more than modern Germans should have to suffer for what happened in WW2. Can we please just move on? Everyone has screwed everyone else at some point and unless it happened in recent history (i.e. the past two generations) I don't think it's worth it.
 

American

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What the hell do you mean "not until now"? It's been an issue since it happened. And I already explained why it is still a relevant issue today, which you never responded to.
She meant the House resolution.
 

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What the hell do you mean "not until now"? It's been an issue since it happened. And I already explained why it is still a relevant issue today, which you never responded to.

So this issue came up in Congress every congressional cycle for nearly 100 years then? I mean....since it happened right? So you got that backed up. I was shown considerations for this over the past 20...but that's nearly 80 years too short for your claims.

Oh and by the way. Saying:

Because it's still relevant today...

is not explaining why it is still relevant today. You merely made a statement.
 
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tacomancer

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So this issue came up in Congress every congressional cycle for nearly 100 years then? I mean....since it happened right? So you got that backed up. I was shown considerations for this over the past 20...but that's nearly 80 years too short for your claims.

Oh and by the way. Saying:



is not explaining why it is still relevant today. You merely made a statement.

It may be something that has come up for longer than what google tells me, given that things did not start to get digitized until the 1980s. I can easily see that apparent ramping up being a limitation of the tool that was used.
 
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Ikari said:
Oh and by the way. Saying:

Khayembii Communique said:
Because it's still relevant today...

is not explaining why it is still relevant today. You merely made a statement.

This is the second place I've seen you post this. The reason that it is signifcant today is because the issue of the Armenians is a very touchy issue even to this day.

As an analogy, you might consider the internment of Japanese during WW2 as "in the past," as do most people. But do you really think that would be the case if Japanese were still treated as second class citizens and widely discriminated against?

The reason that this is still a relevant issue is because the tensions that caused the genocide still exist today.

Read the thread before you respond.
 
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