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Trump and the College

Ganesh

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Some questions. What are the odds that the electoral college, or some critical portion of it, would not carry through with their pledge and fail to elect Trump if he should win the general election?

After all, a sober second thought is supposed to be one of the two major functions of the college, based on the notion that although democracy is great, the unwashed masses cannot be counted on to make a wise choice 100%. Despite the revolutionary fervor of the 1770s, the founding fathers still sought some sort of limit on outright power to the masses, if not the crown, then something. In addition to states equality, a modest buffer to electoral hoopla was considered a good idea at the time of framing the constitution.

If there was ever a case that a foolish vote would require some sort of legal override, it would seem to me a Trump victory would qualify.

If this did happen, would it cause a constitutional crisis? Would it be accepted? Would it led to a complete overhaul of the political system in the US?
 

Anagram

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Some questions. What are the odds that the electoral college, or some critical portion of it, would not carry through with their pledge and fail to elect Trump if he should win the general election?

After all, a sober second thought is supposed to be one of the two major functions of the college, based on the notion that although democracy is great, the unwashed masses cannot be counted on to make a wise choice 100%. Despite the revolutionary fervor of the 1770s, the founding fathers still sought some sort of limit on outright power to the masses, if not the crown, then something. In addition to states equality, a modest buffer to electoral hoopla was considered a good idea at the time of framing the constitution.

If there was ever a case that a foolish vote would require some sort of legal override, it would seem to me a Trump victory would qualify.

If this did happen, would it cause a constitutional crisis? Would it be accepted? Would it led to a complete overhaul of the political system in the US?

I think the odds are right around 0%. About half the states have laws making faithless electors illegal. The odds that a significant enough number of electors from the remaining states would vote against Trump to actually affect the vote are infinitesimally small.
 

cpwill

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Some questions. What are the odds that the electoral college, or some critical portion of it, would not carry through with their pledge and fail to elect Trump if he should win the general election?

After all, a sober second thought is supposed to be one of the two major functions of the college, based on the notion that although democracy is great, the unwashed masses cannot be counted on to make a wise choice 100%. Despite the revolutionary fervor of the 1770s, the founding fathers still sought some sort of limit on outright power to the masses, if not the crown, then something. In addition to states equality, a modest buffer to electoral hoopla was considered a good idea at the time of framing the constitution.

If there was ever a case that a foolish vote would require some sort of legal override, it would seem to me a Trump victory would qualify.

If this did happen, would it cause a constitutional crisis? Would it be accepted? Would it led to a complete overhaul of the political system in the US?

1. It would provoke a Constitutional Crises.
2. The electors would have the superior legal case.
3. Which might not save them from being mobbed.
 

ludin

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They were actually worried about this in the Bush vs Gore election.
if a couple of electors decided to go rouge that they could keep bush from getting the presidency.

that didnt' happen. I think it is a long shot that it will. The electoral pretty much decided
that they vote the majority of who wins their state.
 

blaxshep

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Some questions. What are the odds that the electoral college, or some critical portion of it, would not carry through with their pledge and fail to elect Trump if he should win the general election?

After all, a sober second thought is supposed to be one of the two major functions of the college, based on the notion that although democracy is great, the unwashed masses cannot be counted on to make a wise choice 100%. Despite the revolutionary fervor of the 1770s, the founding fathers still sought some sort of limit on outright power to the masses, if not the crown, then something. In addition to states equality, a modest buffer to electoral hoopla was considered a good idea at the time of framing the constitution.

If there was ever a case that a foolish vote would require some sort of legal override, it would seem to me a Trump victory would qualify.

If this did happen, would it cause a constitutional crisis? Would it be accepted? Would it led to a complete overhaul of the political system in the US?

Seems to me a Hillary victory would qualify as well. Should the electoral college elect Johnson?
 

joG

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Some questions. What are the odds that the electoral college, or some critical portion of it, would not carry through with their pledge and fail to elect Trump if he should win the general election?

After all, a sober second thought is supposed to be one of the two major functions of the college, based on the notion that although democracy is great, the unwashed masses cannot be counted on to make a wise choice 100%. Despite the revolutionary fervor of the 1770s, the founding fathers still sought some sort of limit on outright power to the masses, if not the crown, then something. In addition to states equality, a modest buffer to electoral hoopla was considered a good idea at the time of framing the constitution.

If there was ever a case that a foolish vote would require some sort of legal override, it would seem to me a Trump victory would qualify.

If this did happen, would it cause a constitutional crisis? Would it be accepted? Would it led to a complete overhaul of the political system in the US?

The problem with this race is that an override in the College would be quite desirable per se in the case of Clinton and had he been nominated of BS as well. All three were horrible each in their own right.
 
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