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Tooling for engineering.

BrettNortje

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tool_and_die_maker said:
Tool and die makers are a class of machinists in the manufacturing industries who make jigs, fixtures, dies, molds, machine tools, cutting tools, gauges, and other tools used in manufacturing processes.[1] Depending on which area of concentration a particular person works in, he or she may be called by variations on the name, including tool maker (toolmaker), die maker (diemaker), mold maker (moldmaker), tool fitter (toolfitter), etc.

Tool and die makers work primarily in toolroom environments—sometimes literally in one room but more often in an environment with flexible, semipermeable boundaries from production work. They are skilled artisans (craftspeople) who typically learn their trade through a combination of academic coursework and hands-on instruction, with a substantial period of on-the-job training that is functionally an apprenticeship (although usually not nominally today). Art and science (specifically, applied science) are thoroughly intermixed in their work, as they also are in engineering. Manufacturing engineers and tool and die makers often work in close consultation as part of a manufacturing engineering team. There is often turnover between the careers, as one person may end up working in both at different times of their life, depending on the turns of their particular educational and career path. (In fact, there was no codified difference between them during the 19th century; it was only after World War II that engineering became a regulated profession exclusively defined by a university or college engineering degree.) Both careers require some level of talent in both artistic/artisanal/creative areas and math-and-science areas. Job-shop machinists can be any combination of toolmaker and production machinist. Some work only as machine operators, whereas others switch fluidly between toolroom tasks and production tasks.

So, there is more going on in the tool room than we thought? we should discuss machine tools, dies, jigs, fixtures cutting tools and gauges to see where they can be simplified, of course.
 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_tool said:
A machine tool is a machine for shaping or machining metal or other rigid materials, usually by cutting, boring, grinding, shearing, or other forms of deformation. Machine tools employ some sort of tool that does the cutting or shaping. All machine tools have some means of constraining the workpiece and provide a guided movement of the parts of the machine. Thus the relative movement between the workpiece and the cutting tool (which is called the toolpath) is controlled or constrained by the machine to at least some extent, rather than being entirely "offhand" or "freehand".

The precise definition of the term machine tool varies among users, as discussed below. While all machine tools are "machines that help people to make things", not all factory machines are machine tools.

Today machine tools are typically powered other than by human muscle (e.g., electrically, hydraulically, or via line shaft), used to make manufactured parts (components) in various ways that include cutting or certain other kinds of deformation.

With their inherent precision, machine tools enabled the economical production of interchangeable parts.

Machine tools are used to deform materials. this could include silicon and plastics, of course. these parts would come out of a mold and then be put physically into the thing they are a part of, yes?

Now, if we were to observe that tools will make shapes inside of other things that come out of molds, then maybe the right course is to make a new type of mold where the parts are inserted right into it before the product is shaped? this could be done by allowing the mold to have inserts that are inserted into a drying material, and allowing wires to be mixed into the mold so as to get the final product quickly made.

This would prove to be cheaper, and, the quality can go through before the parts are used in the mold. this would allow for faster finished goods, but if the parts break, then you need to throw the whole thing away, of course.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_tool said:
Examples of machine tools are:
Broaching machine
Drill press
Gear shaper
Hobbing machine
Hone
Lathe
Screw machines
Milling machine
Shear (sheet metal)
Shaper
Saws
Planer
Stewart platform mills
Grinding machines
Multitasking machines (MTMs)—CNC machine tools with many axes that combine turning, milling, grinding, and material handling into one highly automated machine tool

When fabricating or shaping parts, several techniques are used to remove unwanted metal. Among these are:
Electrical discharge machining
Grinding (abrasive cutting)
Multiple edge cutting tools
Single edge cutting tools

Other techniques are used to add desired material. Devices that fabricate components by selective addition of material are called rapid prototyping machines.
 

BrettNortje

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Broaching is where there is a rotary or single line file slash saw that makes indents on the metals. it would be far easier to make these with the mold still setting, so that we could use something that is not sticky, or, will not allow for the materials to stick tot he broach.

This could be done by inserting a lot of the materials inside a piece of paper, something that will dissolve yet lay the foundations for the initial shaping, of course. then, the materials could be broached before the need for saws and the like.

Or, the broaches could be made of something that breaks them off, quickly, then would allow for more consistent shape forming this could be done by slicing a mini line of polarized magnetism onto the outside of the materials, and then having a laser attracted to these lines so as to cut out the shape without errors.
 

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Instead of using a gear shaper, the gear, could be made while the metals are still liquid, simply by using another gear that is turning to shape them. this would be like using a cake mold, of course.

The advantage of this is not having to resharpen tools and the speed of it. obviously the gears would come out from the original shape, and, then make a perfect gear if used with air pressure guiding it towards the gear and surrounding necessary shapes and gears.
 

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Your pontificating about things you don't know about.

Research forged vs cast.


Obviously it would be easier to simply make casts for every metal thing we need. But there are many different traits of different metals, and all of them changed based on how those metals are treated.
 

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Honing is using stones to make the surface more smooth in a angular way. this is like sandpapering for wood, of course, and, guess what - the sand paper is basically a piece of paper with sand on it... get it? rocks! of course, the sand is used to make it smooth, and the more it is used, the more it degrades.

So, how do we make this faster... i cannot imagine it being fast, as then the rocks would fall apart. simply we should use wood first to get the metal hot, as this will not break. then, we could use 'sand paper' and then stone. this would allow for a 'gradual indentation' into the metals, with the wood making it smoother, the sand paper making all the chips come off, then a rapid stone treatment to make it smoother, with less chance of breaking your tool.
 

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You're trying to change the world.





Try learning more about it first. Reading you posts is like having a 30 year veteran listen to a new recruit tell him how to do his job.

I mean that respectfully, but it shows a LACK of respect from you when you presume to know more about....everything, apparently, than the folks that have been doing it for decades.
 

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Any machine used in engineering that requires programming to it, usually also needs a hard drive, yes? well, if they were to mount a circuit board, it would do the same thing. basically, the circuits put the machine on and off, and, at different power levels. when you plug the machine into the wall, you connect it with maximum charge, or, huge amounts of potentially used electricity - that is why you can plug so many things into one plug in your house.

So, if you were to mount simple circuits, it would be simpler to use, easier to repair, cost much less and be faster to make. this would require, of course, a circuit to regulate the incoming current, so that it does not melt the whole machine or things attached to the plug. this is basic electrical engineering, where you need to put a circuit into the machine to take only so much electricity while on, regulating the need for electricity by the pull factor of electrons from the wall socket. this would of course result in the machine melting if not regulated, as the circuit somehow allows only needed electricity in - all energy is heat, okay? the heat comes from negative spin energy particles, like electrons and leptons, but mainly electrons, as there are so many of them in each atom. this means that the 'heat that they produce by spinning' is kept stable by the positive spin things, like protons, balancing them out. if there is a collision, like two stones against each other, the electrons get 'stimulated' and then there is a spark, due to the heat becoming so intense it creates lightning, as, that is what a spark is, a 'junior lightning thing.'

So, to make the perfect circuit board, the error correcting just needs to be be dealt with. this could be done by having a set of circuits that check each other, and, then a reverse circuit that gauges the speed the part is moving at. if it is going too fast, then it supplies less power, too slow and it supplies more power. this is easily done by having transistors be a part of it by having them moving, and, if not moving, supplying the 'machine' or circuit board with that information in the form of being placed off, as they are not stimulated in this 'backward deal.' obviously if it is going too fast, the transistors amount and configuration will stop it going so fast, as there are only a limited amount of transistors to place on, and, having a backward compatible 'plug in wall' circuit breaker could see that pan out nicely.
 

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This milling thing must stop! i am suggesting replacing all tooling with hydraulic presses! these would see the metal laid down, and then using a bolt cutter type of concept, we use pressure applied very fast to shape the metal with a cardboard cut out sort of thing.

This will see the metal pressed into position, or, simply pushed/cut away from the rest of the materials. this would be like a 'paper press,' where the paper is cut when they separate it from the rest of the paper or magazine materials.
 

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This milling thing must stop! i am suggesting replacing all tooling with hydraulic presses! these would see the metal laid down, and then using a bolt cutter type of concept, we use pressure applied very fast to shape the metal with a cardboard cut out sort of thing.

This will see the metal pressed into position, or, simply pushed/cut away from the rest of the materials. this would be like a 'paper press,' where the paper is cut when they separate it from the rest of the paper or magazine materials.

Learn metallurgy.
 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tool_management said:
Tool management is needed in metalworking so that the information regarding the tools on hand can be uniformly organized and integrated. The information is stored in a database and is registered and applied using tool management. Tool data management consists of specific data fields, graphics and parameters that are essential in production, as opposed to managing general production equipment.

Unlike hand tools, a tool in numerically (digitally) controlled machines is composed of several parts, such as the cutting tool (which may be one piece or comprise a body plus indexable inserts), a collet, and a toolholder with a machine taper. Putting the parts together accurately into an assembly is required to achieve error-free production.

Processing a part with a CNC (computer numerically controlled) machining operation requires several tool assemblies that are documented in a list. Each component, each assembly and each list has an identifier under which the specifications are found. Tool management is divided into documentation (master data) and logistics (transaction data). The documentation includes information needed for a trouble-free and a comprehensible production process. Spare parts, experiences in production and the corresponding data can be managed. Several functions are available to manage, process, print and combine with other applications.

Logistics deals with demand planning, supplies and tool location. This includes, on one hand, the location in the warehouse and the purchasing of individual parts with the corresponding consumption report. It also allows the planning and coordination of the movements of the assemblies within the shop floor.

In the decades of the 2000s and 2010s, tool management has increasingly moved toward a universal, industry-standard, machine-readable format for encoding tooling information, which makes possible better software, greater automation, and better simulation. ISO 13399 (Cutting tool data representation and exchange) "is an international standard designed to give industry a common language to describe cutting tool products in a digital format."[1]

Tool management is about checking the specs of the tools you are using. basically, it is there to tell you when to sharpen things, or when things have too much resin on them, or, that the tool is just 'not so sharp' anymore.

If you were to apply a coating of graphene to the tools, they would never get 'damaged.' this can be done cheaply, quickly and easily by a solution that will allow the graphene to be set through heating techniques to make the graphene liquid, then dry to form 'the coating.'
 

BrettNortje

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Learn metallurgy.

Is there anything in particular you would like to tell me about that 'metallurgy topic?' we could replace the shaping of it, like i said, with graphene pressing, as, that will not get damaged, while the metals can be shaped well, and then coated.
 

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The "degree of freedom" is where the gears or parts are allowed a little space to operate without bringing the machine or gears to a standstill. if the angles were observed, and the recommended degrees are five degrees for the leeway of the gears turning, as if they were set like jig saw pieces, then they would not be able to turn. but, this approach comes with a formula, which we simplify for everyone.

I would say, since that other formula is so 'hard,' that we start with 360 degrees or 1080 degrees on the outside. this means that the 'corresponding gear' that will fit into the materials needs to be at right angles or 90 degrees for 'maximum efficiency.' this would see the relevant gear positioned at forty five degrees, obviously, and then allow for four gears to be mounted in with it.

Now, when it comes to putting little gears into a big one, then you need to observe that it depends on the size of the gear, so that the gear will be given some freedom between the other gears. ideally, this space equals one degree at least, measured via cross section from the original angle or place. this means that you take 1080 degrees and divide these by the 'number of gears,' to find out where each goes. then, you filter it by finding how big each gear may be, through trigonometry, by taking distance or area in degrees equaling the [1080 degrees - 1a] / [area * a]. this would see the angles represent the area by making each angle of the smaller gear translates into area of the smaller one.
 

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Is there anything in particular you would like to tell me about that 'metallurgy topic?' we could replace the shaping of it, like i said, with graphene pressing, as, that will not get damaged, while the metals can be shaped well, and then coated.

You can't hot or cold press everything. You can't cast everything. We have a wide range of needs from our metal tools. If it was that easy, we would already be doing it. Some things need to be hard and rigid. Some things need to be hard but with give. Some things need to be hard but flexible.


Let me put it to you like this. A crescent wrench, a spring, and an I beam are all made from the same thing. But they are all physically completely different. Because of the way they were handled during construction.
 

BrettNortje

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You can't hot or cold press everything. You can't cast everything. We have a wide range of needs from our metal tools. If it was that easy, we would already be doing it. Some things need to be hard and rigid. Some things need to be hard but with give. Some things need to be hard but flexible.


Let me put it to you like this. A crescent wrench, a spring, and an I beam are all made from the same thing. But they are all physically completely different. Because of the way they were handled during construction.

I hear and understand what you are saying, but honestly i am so excited about this sort of thing to bring it forwards or make it work better that often i forget that there are things that are hard to do and have been thought of before.

But, wouldn't you say i have some good ideas? not all of them, just some of them?
 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precision_engineering said:
One of the fundamental principles in precision engineering is that of determinism. System behavior is fully predictable even to nanometer-scale motions.

"The basic idea is that machine tools obey cause and effect relationships that are within our ability to understand and control and that there is nothing random or probabilistic about their behavior. Everything happens for a reason and the list of reasons is small enough to manage." - Jim Bryan

"By this we mean that machine tool errors obey cause-and-effect relationships, and do not vary randomly for no reason. Further, the causes are not esoteric and uncontrollable, but can be explained in terms of familiar engineering principles." - Bob Donaldson

Professors Hiromu Nakazawa and Pat McKeown provide the following list of goals for precision engineering:

Create a highly precise movement.
Reduce the dispersion of the product's or part's function.
Eliminate fitting and promote assembly, especially automatic assembly.
Reduce the initial cost.
Reduce the running cost.
Extend the life span.
Enable the design safety factor to be lowered.
Improve interchangeability of components so that corresponding parts made by other factories or firms can be used in their place.
Improve quality control through higher machine accuracy capabilities and hence reduce scrap, rework, and conventional inspection.
Achieve a greater wear/fatigue life of components.
Make functions independent of one another.
Achieve greater miniaturization and packing densities.
Achieve further advances in technology and the underlying sciences."[2]

First, i want to talk about making functions independent of each other. this can be done by setting up a conveyor belt and factory style production method, which is what this 'task' is about. simply, there needs to be a huge impetus put on precision, as this is precision engineering, so we would need to make very small tools for them. these can be fitted into grooves on the belt that are also precise, and, then have a feeler, like those 'toy grabbing machines' with the pincer to grab the toys, but in this case it would be the product or materials.

Then, the clamp could close precisely by using magnets on the belt, or, magnetism to get it into the right place. this would see the actual belt or grooves on the belt being charged slightly, as this is very small things we are dealing with, and, if the charge is too much, then the pincer might miss. so, we need to make the pincer an opposing charge to the materials or items, and the belt a unlike charge. this will make the pincer grab onto the belt with great attraction, and the product will resist, as, the pincer will be resistant to the product, yet clutch to the base of the belt and therefore the item.

Then, the pincer and other things will need to be 'rubbery' so as to not damage the materials. this will mean they will slide over the item until they have found the right placement, and then begin doing what they are supposed to do.
 

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I hear and understand what you are saying, but honestly i am so excited about this sort of thing to bring it forwards or make it work better that often i forget that there are things that are hard to do and have been thought of before.

But, wouldn't you say i have some good ideas? not all of them, just some of them?

I would say that you're trying to, but to be honest, you can't revolutionize something without being highly intimately familiar with it. As in, know it, inside and out, forwards and backwards, etc.

My dad was a metal worker, so I know a LITTLE, but certainly not enough to be proposing changes of any sort.

Let me ask you a question that will put you on the path.

What's the difference between iron and steel.

If you have to look up the answer, to get it correct, then that's a strong sign suggesting that you have way more to learn before you can really even begin to try to problem solve on the subject.
 

BrettNortje

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I would say that you're trying to, but to be honest, you can't revolutionize something without being highly intimately familiar with it. As in, know it, inside and out, forwards and backwards, etc.

My dad was a metal worker, so I know a LITTLE, but certainly not enough to be proposing changes of any sort.

Let me ask you a question that will put you on the path.

What's the difference between iron and steel.

If you have to look up the answer, to get it correct, then that's a strong sign suggesting that you have way more to learn before you can really even begin to try to problem solve on the subject.

I think one of them has more density than the other.
 

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I think one of them has more density than the other.

Carbon.

More carbon, harder, but more brittle iron. Steel. An alloy of iron.

Less carbon, softer, more malleable iron. Iron. An element.

And there are worlds of variations in between. Steel is made by melting iron with some form of wood burning. Well, that's he old school, black smith way. The carbon released from the burning wood or coal mixes with the melting iron, and once cooled, voila.


As Conan the barbarian would say, the riddle of steel, answered.

But it doesn't stop there. Anytime you melt iron, you run the risk of changing its properties. And there no pressing or forming some of the harder varieties of steal, especially once you start adding chromium to it. Only way to work it then is by machining.
 

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Carbon.

More carbon, harder, but more brittle iron. Steel. An alloy of iron.

Less carbon, softer, more malleable iron. Iron. An element.

And there are worlds of variations in between. Steel is made by melting iron with some form of wood burning. Well, that's he old school, black smith way. The carbon released from the burning wood or coal mixes with the melting iron, and once cooled, voila.


As Conan the barbarian would say, the riddle of steel, answered.

But it doesn't stop there. Anytime you melt iron, you run the risk of changing its properties. And there no pressing or forming some of the harder varieties of steal, especially once you start adding chromium to it. Only way to work it then is by machining.
History and legend are filled with stories of magic swords, I have always thought that every so often
a blacksmith would end up with steel instead of iron, and the sword would be so much better that it would appear magic.
 

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I hear and understand what you are saying, but honestly i am so excited about this sort of thing to bring it forwards or make it work better that often i forget that there are things that are hard to do and have been thought of before.

But, wouldn't you say i have some good ideas? not all of them, just some of them?

No, all of your ideas are bad because all of them are based on poor understanding of every topic.

You can't change a field you don't know anything about. It doesn't mean you're stupid. I don't know crap about fixing or designing cars. I can change the oil and the tires, but that's about it. I'm not going to suggest changes to how engines are designed.

Your global warming thread had you starting from a fundamentally incorrect concept, that ozone "insulates us against space." And that changing ozone would change atmospheric pressure. That starting point was wrong, making the whole idea wrong. Worse, ozone is a greenhouse gas. Increasing ozone in the atmosphere could actually warm the planet.

Your global warming idea makes global warming worse. That happened because you don't understand the basics of climatology or meteorology.

Learn about a field before you try to change it. To do otherwise is sheer arrogance. And for god's sake, nobody can change every field.
 
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Learn metallurgy.

I am not a metallurgist but I know for a fact that you can't treat all metal the same way. There are certain things that you can do with some metals and not others.

I was watching a special on the new orion capsule that they are making and they are using a new welding method to make a seamless weld.
it brings the metal up to a hot temperature to move it around but not the melting point.

you probably couldn't use that on other metals it would work or their melting points are too high.
 
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History and legend are filled with stories of magic swords, I have always thought that every so often
a blacksmith would end up with steel instead of iron, and the sword would be so much better that it would appear magic.

The process of making iron before the industrial revolution involved beating the iron ore untill the not metal bits were hammer out of it at high temperature. The result was always steel but of very differing quality.

The Japanese swords with their many folded layers which stop the sword shattering so easily are not so special. I have seen a reconstruction of a dark ages Frankish sword which put them to shame with two many folded them spiraled bars welded together with higher carbon steel welded onto the sides of this and then the sword was formed and polished. Magnificent piece of metal work.
 

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Your pontificating about things you don't know about.

Research forged vs cast.


Obviously it would be easier to simply make casts for every metal thing we need. But there are many different traits of different metals, and all of them changed based on how those metals are treated.

I traded my cast golf clubs for forged golf clubs.
 
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