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The Vacation/Trip Thread

Glitch

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Looks like Mrs azgreg and I are headed for Mesa Verde National Park at the end of the month for our 29th anniversary.

Mesa Verde National Park (U.S. National Park Service)


Very nice, although I have never been there. I did manage to visit every State west of the Mississippi River, although since 1991 all my vacations have been in Alaska. You could say that I have been on a 29 year vacation. :mrgreen:

I am particularly enjoying this Summer. It is the very first Summer in Alaska that I have experienced without the annual ~2 million tourists. That means there is a lot more salmon for us locals.

It is a very interesting place to live. You see things that you normally wouldn't anywhere else. Like a pod of Beluga whales swimming more than a mile up river in pursuit of salmon. Or two bull moose fighting it out in someone's front yard in Anchorage. Or an 8 foot tall bull moose walking down the middle of the road, in traffic.

Moose.jpg

We also try to warn the tourists about our mosquitoes. :lamo

Mosquito, Giant.jpg

Whenever there is a problem with the wildlife it is our official policy to relocate the tourist causing the problem. It isn't officially Spring in Alaska until some tourist has been mauled by a bear or stomped by a moose.

While Summers are very busy with activity from harvesting edible plants, catching salmon, and hunting both caribou and moose, it is Autumn that is the most beautiful of all the seasons, and what most tourists miss.

Autumn in Alaska.jpg

Winters are the second prettiest season, particularly with the northern lights dancing overhead and reflecting off the snow.

Alaska Northern Lights.jpg

I made a video commemorating my 25th year in Alaska, and it includes a few of the things that I love about this State.

Alaska - YouTube
 

Mycroft

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Looks like Mrs azgreg and I are headed for Mesa Verde National Park at the end of the month for our 29th anniversary.

Mesa Verde National Park (U.S. National Park Service)


That's a cool place...one of the first I went to after the Gulf War.

(I came to Colorado in Jan 90, welcomed my first son into the world in Oct and shipped out to Saudi Arabia in Nov. Got back home in Apr 91.)

If you don't already know, you'll find out what those circular structures are...it's interesting.

I would have been going to Broken Arrow OK...outside of Tulsa...in July for a Drum Corps show, but that's out. No Drum Corps this year. So, I'll be doing a handful of camping trips in state, instead. The first will be next weekend at Antero Reservoir.


This is camping at it's finest...boondocking. (that means no services...not even water. You bring everything in and take everything out.)
 

ModerationNow!

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How about a thread to discuss out vacations and trips including the much underrated day trips?

I'll start. Me and Mrs. azgreg are headed to Utah next week to do some hiking at Bryce Canyon and Zion National Park with a stop at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Can't wait.
Lucky, lucky, lucky, lucky, lucky you!! I havent backpacked anywhere since the last trip to the Pa Appalachian trail in 2008. I live in Delaware, and aside from a flight over the midwest, from Philly to LA in 1983-ish, Ive never actually stepped foot anywhere but LA, Santa Ana, Phoenix and Scottsdale, all during that same trip. But it was a business trip, and my father had us go along.

I would've LOVED to have hiked the saguaro cactus riddled Sonoran desert we drove through on our way to Scottsdale. But twas not to be. Instead, during that short trip, we visited Tombstone, and the "Spruce Goose"/Queen Mary museum in Long Beach. It would've been more interesting as an adult, but not so much as a 14/15 year old kid.

While in "the LBC", we did get into a gun battle with Snoop Dog, Warren G and Nate Dog, because they were "loced out G's" at that point, not yet rappers. Granted, bustin caps back & forth against the west side pimps was cray cray, but I chalk it up as "just a G thing". (I couldnt hesitate to pass up the opportunity)!

So anyway, ive traveled up and down the east coast, but ive literally never driven further west than 2 trips to Asheville NC(1977 & 1994), to approx 38 acres of undeveloped mountaintop property we used to own, but sold in 2003, and reinvested in a condo in Martin county Fl. But i only get down to the condo about once every 2-3 years.
 
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Very nice, although I have never been there. I did manage to visit every State west of the Mississippi River, although since 1991 all my vacations have been in Alaska. You could say that I have been on a 29 year vacation. :mrgreen:

I am particularly enjoying this Summer. It is the very first Summer in Alaska that I have experienced without the annual ~2 million tourists. That means there is a lot more salmon for us locals.

It is a very interesting place to live. You see things that you normally wouldn't anywhere else. Like a pod of Beluga whales swimming more than a mile up river in pursuit of salmon. Or two bull moose fighting it out in someone's front yard in Anchorage. Or an 8 foot tall bull moose walking down the middle of the road, in traffic.

View attachment 67283791

We also try to warn the tourists about our mosquitoes. :lamo

View attachment 67283792

Whenever there is a problem with the wildlife it is our official policy to relocate the tourist causing the problem. It isn't officially Spring in Alaska until some tourist has been mauled by a bear or stomped by a moose.

While Summers are very busy with activity from harvesting edible plants, catching salmon, and hunting both caribou and moose, it is Autumn that is the most beautiful of all the seasons, and what most tourists miss.

View attachment 67283794

Winters are the second prettiest season, particularly with the northern lights dancing overhead and reflecting off the snow.

View attachment 67283795

I made a video commemorating my 25th year in Alaska, and it includes a few of the things that I love about this State.

Alaska - YouTube
Ahh, you speak of the enormous mountain ranges, wide open wild spaces, and the northern lights, all found in my home state.... You mentioned the caribou, moose, dahl sheep and brown bears. You spoke of salmon runs, bison herds, whales, glaciers, 16,000 - 20,000 foot snow capped peaks. Millions of acres of undeveloped land and pristine lakes! Granted, you left out the beautiful desolation of our deserts, but it would take a lifetime to see it all! Obviously, you were privileged enough to visit the state of Delaware! Lol
 
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Going next weekend to the wife's alma mater in South Bend, IN for the Notre Dame/Navy game. Great campus to spend the day touring if ever you get the chance.

Normally I'd be getting ready to make my annual pilgrimage to the Holy Land (The Palazzo, Las Vegas) during the week of Thanksgiving.

BUT

I don't have anyone to watch my dog. Grrrrrr.....

In 12 years the good ol' boy has never been boarded in a kennel and I'm not going to make his last few years a time to start.

SO

We're hosting the holiday instead.

Gonna shoot for a 10 day after Christmas to go somewhere but if we run into the same problem.....:shrug:
You mentioned your annual trip to "the Holy Land". Do you believe in the biblical tale of enslavement of Moses' people, forced to build the Luxor Las Vegas pyramid? Or do you accept the more recent historical research regarding the large number of ancient Jews, as hired workers, who were paid for their Luxor carpentry, by the ancient Las Vegas pharoahs?

Theres evidence that Moses led his followers across The Sahara(casino parking lot), so they could reach the temporary service office, to be granted a contract to build the New York, New York resort as well!
 
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I'm retired and live in Florida - say what you will about either or both, I'm always on vacation. :mrgreen:
I live in Delaware. For the life of me, i can't understand the dislike or hatred of Florida thats mentioned from time to time by northerners. I'll list some reasons why everyone should love Florida!

We bought a condo down in southeastern Martin county, just north of the Martin/Palm Beach county line. We are just across the intracoastal waterway from the northern end of Jupiter Island. Our place overlooks the well maintained fairway of the golf course our community is based around. Everything about the way the development, the roads, and the landscaping in and around our development is MUCH nicer than the vast majority of housing developments up north in the quad-state region of De, Md, Pa, NJ where i actually live. But yet we paid just $135,000 for our condo in 2003!

In most cases, you get MUCH MORE for your money in Florida than up here, when it comes to houses, condos, housing developments etc. The roads and landscaping are just much nicer, more extensive and better maintained in housing developments down there. All that for MUCH LESS money in most cases!

Aside from the housing, the primary roads are in better shape, the parks are nicer, the beaches absolutely BLOW AWAY the beaches in De, NJ, NY and in Md for the most part! Everything about the beaches in Martin, Palm Beach county are better! They are cleaner, and many of them have facilities like showers right beside the parking areas to rinse sand from everything before you get back into your car. You dont have to pay for parking, AND you park closer to the beach! There's NO charge for visiting the beaches either!

Best of all, you can comfortably walk around in tshirts and shorts in winter most days. You can comfortably swim in the ocean in December to February during many winters, without feeling freezing cold!

That brings up the WARM, clean, clear, blue ocean water! That doesnt really exist in DE, MD, NJ beaches! Also very few jellyfish, if any at all. There are SO MANY really nice towns and cities in that area, with a LOT of really nice restaurants that DON'T charge the ridiculous prices of NY and NJ, MD, etc. There are regular piers, etc

Then theres the wildlife! Youve got tropical and subtropical wildlife, reptiles and birds that you dont see up north. You see manatees, alligators(if you wish), cool little lizards and anoles scurrying around, herons walking around, tropical fish, etc.

The attractions are also much nicer!
 
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beefheart

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We did a night in Sedona last week, and a few weeks back we did 3 nights in Carlsbad, fun...
 

Glitch

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Ahh, you speak of the enormous mountain ranges, wide open wild spaces, and the northern lights, all found in my home state.... You mentioned the caribou, moose, dahl sheep and brown bears. You spoke of salmon runs, bison herds, whales, glaciers, 16,000 - 20,000 foot snow capped peaks. Millions of acres of undeveloped land and pristine lakes! Granted, you left out the beautiful desolation of our deserts, but it would take a lifetime to see it all! Obviously, you were privileged enough to visit the state of Delaware! Lol
I did indeed leave out our deserts and the sand dunes. Probably because I have never been to Kobuk Valley National Park. There are no roads, and it is doesn't get many visitors considering they closed the visitor center in 2016.

Kobuk Valley.jpg
Kobuk Valley National Park

I have been to the north slope, however. Numerous times. I used to work for BP, ARCO, Exxon, and Conoco/Phillips. With less than 7" of annual precipitation the north slope technically qualifies as a desert. I have never visited during its three week summer, however, when the tundra is in bloom. I have only been to the north slope between October and March, which was always snow-covered.

north-slope.jpg
North Slope in late July

I also omitted our rainforest. With between 50 and 200 inches of annual precipitation the Tongass National Forest certainly qualifies as a temperate rainforest.

You are right about needing a lifetime to see all of Alaska.

Tongass National Forest - YouTube

FYI, the city of Anchorage is 79% the size of the State of Delaware. ;)
 
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I did indeed leave out our deserts and the sand dunes. Probably because I have never been to Kobuk Valley National Park. There are no roads, and it is doesn't get many visitors considering they closed the visitor center in 2016.

View attachment 67283901
Kobuk Valley National Park

I have been to the north slope, however. Numerous times. I used to work for BP, ARCO, Exxon, and Conoco/Phillips. With less than 7" of annual precipitation the north slope technically qualifies as a desert. I have never visited during its three week summer, however, when the tundra is in bloom. I have only been to the north slope between October and March, which was always snow-covered.

View attachment 67283902
North Slope in late July

I also omitted our rainforest. With between 50 and 200 inches of annual precipitation the Tongass National Forest certainly qualifies as a temperate rainforest.

Tongass National Forest - YouTube

FYI, the city of Anchorage is 79% the size of the State of Delaware. ;)
Thats a LOT of sand in the first picture. Is that landlocked sand, not adjacent to the ocean or a major body of water? How long and wide is that sandy area there? Is that permafrost tundra in the lower photo? What are the strange, dark spots scattered throughout the yellowish area in the 2nd photo, and is that dry land, or is it a waterlogged swamp during that particular time of year?

Maybe too many questions....
 

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Thats a LOT of sand in the first picture. Is that landlocked sand, not adjacent to the ocean or a major body of water? How long and wide is that sandy area there? Is that permafrost tundra in the lower photo? What are the strange, dark spots scattered throughout the yellowish area in the 2nd photo, and is that dry land, or is it a waterlogged swamp during that particular time of year?

Maybe too many questions....
Yes. Kobuk Valley National Park is landlocked, 75+ miles east of the Chukchi Sea and 40 miles north of the Arctic Circle.

Kobuk Valley National Park.jpg

The valley is in a rain shadow, sandwiched between the Baird Mountain Range to the north, the Waring Mountain Range to the south, the Jade Mountains to the east, and the Kallarichuk Hills to the west.

Kobuk Valley 1.jpg

85% of Alaska is still covered in permafrost, and that includes the north slope. Those dark strange spots is actually liquid water. It isn't very deep, maybe a foot or two. The tundra is several hundred feet thick, and feels like a sponge when you walk on it. Unlike a sponge, however, your foot prints will not spring back quickly. You can still see the tracks made in the tundra when they were building the pipeline in 1977.

When I was there the north slope was always frozen. However, during the three week Summer it does get warm enough to melt the first couple feet of permafrost and creates swamp-like conditions.
 
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