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The Silliness of Jeremy Corbyn

Jack Hays

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In a year in which many Americans are dismayed by our Presidential choices, it's comforting, in a small way, to see silliness on the other side of the Atlantic as well.

Britain, too, is infected with political silliness


Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn is a reactionary masquerading as a revolutionary.





". . . In the 1983 election, the last time Labour flirted with serious socialism, its manifesto (platform) was described as “the longest suicide note in history,” and a party activist advocated “no compromise with the electorate.” The electorate was not amused, and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher continued residing at 10 Downing Street.

"That year, Corbyn was elected to the House of Commons. He spent his next 32 years opposing the monarchy; writing columns for a communist newspaper; expressing admiration for Hugo Chávez, whose socialism propelled Venezuela toward today’s chaos; proposing that taxpayers should be permitted to opt out of paying for Britain’s army; advocating that Britain leave NATO and unilaterally scrap its nuclear deterrent; blaming NATO, meaning the United States, for Vladimir Putin’s war against Ukraine; calling the terrorist groups Hamas and Hezbollah “friends”; appearing with and funding Holocaust deniers and other anti-Semites; criticizing China’s Communist regime for deviationism in accepting some free markets; demanding that Tony Blair, the only Labour leader since 1976 to win a general election (three of them), be tried as a war criminal (for supporting the Iraq War); praising Iraqi insurgents killing Americans; and calling the killing of Osama bin Laden a “tragedy.” Along the way, Corbyn got divorced because his wife insisted on sending their eldest son to a selective school whose admissions policy recognized merit. . . .

"Financial Times columnist Janan Ganesh sees Corbyn as a symptom of broad social contentment. Corbynism is the persuasion “of people who can afford to treat politics as a source of gaiety and affirmation. . . . They are in politics for the dopamine squirt that comes with total belief and immersion in like-minded company.” So, they are not unlike America’s Sandernistas and Trumpkins."
 
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joG

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In a year in which many Americans are dismayed by our Presidential choices, it's comforting, in a small way, to see silliness on the other side of the Atlantic as well.

Britain, too, is infected with political silliness


Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn is a reactionary masquerading as a revolutionary.





". . . In the 1983 election, the last time Labour flirted with serious socialism, its manifesto (platform) was described as “the longest suicide note in history,” and a party activist advocated “no compromise with the electorate.” The electorate was not amused, and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher continued residing at 10 Downing Street.

"That year, Corbyn was elected to the House of Commons. He spent his next 32 years opposing the monarchy; writing columns for a communist newspaper; expressing admiration for Hugo Chávez, whose socialism propelled Venezuela toward today’s chaos; proposing that taxpayers should be permitted to opt out of paying for Britain’s army; advocating that Britain leave NATO and unilaterally scrap its nuclear deterrent; blaming NATO, meaning the United States, for Vladimir Putin’s war against Ukraine; calling the terrorist groups Hamas and Hezbollah “friends”; appearing with and funding Holocaust deniers and other anti-Semites; criticizing China’s Communist regime for deviationism in accepting some free markets; demanding that Tony Blair, the only Labour leader since 1976 to win a general election (three of them), be tried as a war criminal (for supporting the Iraq War); praising Iraqi insurgents killing Americans; and calling the killing of Osama bin Laden a “tragedy.” Along the way, Corbyn got divorced because his wife insisted on sending their eldest son to a selective school whose admissions policy recognized merit. . . .

"Financial Times columnist Janan Ganesh sees Corbyn as a symptom of broad social contentment. Corbynism is the persuasion “of people who can afford to treat politics as a source of gaiety and affirmation. . . . They are in politics for the dopamine squirt that comes with total belief and immersion in like-minded company.” So, they are not unlike America’s Sandernistas and Trumpkins."

That man is just as stuck in his good times as a young rebel as is BS in the US. And today they get noticed and feel important, which they are in the morbid way of populist danger.
 

Dittohead not!

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In a year in which many Americans are dismayed by our Presidential choices, it's comforting, in a small way, to see silliness on the other side of the Atlantic as well.

Britain, too, is infected with political silliness


Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn is a reactionary masquerading as a revolutionary.





". . . In the 1983 election, the last time Labour flirted with serious socialism, its manifesto (platform) was described as “the longest suicide note in history,” and a party activist advocated “no compromise with the electorate.” The electorate was not amused, and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher continued residing at 10 Downing Street.

"That year, Corbyn was elected to the House of Commons. He spent his next 32 years opposing the monarchy; writing columns for a communist newspaper; expressing admiration for Hugo Chávez, whose socialism propelled Venezuela toward today’s chaos; proposing that taxpayers should be permitted to opt out of paying for Britain’s army; advocating that Britain leave NATO and unilaterally scrap its nuclear deterrent; blaming NATO, meaning the United States, for Vladimir Putin’s war against Ukraine; calling the terrorist groups Hamas and Hezbollah “friends”; appearing with and funding Holocaust deniers and other anti-Semites; criticizing China’s Communist regime for deviationism in accepting some free markets; demanding that Tony Blair, the only Labour leader since 1976 to win a general election (three of them), be tried as a war criminal (for supporting the Iraq War); praising Iraqi insurgents killing Americans; and calling the killing of Osama bin Laden a “tragedy.” Along the way, Corbyn got divorced because his wife insisted on sending their eldest son to a selective school whose admissions policy recognized merit. . . .

"Financial Times columnist Janan Ganesh sees Corbyn as a symptom of broad social contentment. Corbynism is the persuasion “of people who can afford to treat politics as a source of gaiety and affirmation. . . . They are in politics for the dopamine squirt that comes with total belief and immersion in like-minded company.” So, they are not unlike America’s Sandernistas and Trumpkins."

Aha! The Brits have their insane politicians as well. How close is this guy to becoming PM?
 

Andalublue

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If Labour wins, he's da man.

And with the Tories tearing themselves to pieces, he's a lot closer to power than you might think. Conservatives and Labour are current even in polling at 34% each, and that after countless hatchet jobs on Corbyn by the likes of the right-wing press that you've been quoting. A truly socialist Labour government isn't as remote a dream as you may wish.
 

Tigerace117

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And with the Tories tearing themselves to pieces, he's a lot closer to power than you might think. Conservatives and Labour are current even in polling at 34% each, and that after countless hatchet jobs on Corbyn by the likes of the right-wing press that you've been quoting. A truly socialist Labour government isn't as remote a dream as you may wish.

And with Corbyn running the show that's a scary thought.
 

polgara

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Aha! The Brits have their insane politicians as well. How close is this guy to becoming PM?

Greetings, Dittohead not! :2wave:

:shock: .. :thumbs: Why not. . .he's just saying all the usual PC things.... :mrgreen:
 

polgara

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In a year in which many Americans are dismayed by our Presidential choices, it's comforting, in a small way, to see silliness on the other side of the Atlantic as well.

Britain, too, is infected with political silliness


Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn is a reactionary masquerading as a revolutionary.





". . . In the 1983 election, the last time Labour flirted with serious socialism, its manifesto (platform) was described as “the longest suicide note in history,” and a party activist advocated “no compromise with the electorate.” The electorate was not amused, and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher continued residing at 10 Downing Street.

"That year, Corbyn was elected to the House of Commons. He spent his next 32 years opposing the monarchy; writing columns for a communist newspaper; expressing admiration for Hugo Chávez, whose socialism propelled Venezuela toward today’s chaos; proposing that taxpayers should be permitted to opt out of paying for Britain’s army; advocating that Britain leave NATO and unilaterally scrap its nuclear deterrent; blaming NATO, meaning the United States, for Vladimir Putin’s war against Ukraine; calling the terrorist groups Hamas and Hezbollah “friends”; appearing with and funding Holocaust deniers and other anti-Semites; criticizing China’s Communist regime for deviationism in accepting some free markets; demanding that Tony Blair, the only Labour leader since 1976 to win a general election (three of them), be tried as a war criminal (for supporting the Iraq War); praising Iraqi insurgents killing Americans; and calling the killing of Osama bin Laden a “tragedy.” Along the way, Corbyn got divorced because his wife insisted on sending their eldest son to a selective school whose admissions policy recognized merit. . . .

"Financial Times columnist Janan Ganesh sees Corbyn as a symptom of broad social contentment. Corbynism is the persuasion “of people who can afford to treat politics as a source of gaiety and affirmation. . . . They are in politics for the dopamine squirt that comes with total belief and immersion in like-minded company.” So, they are not unlike America’s Sandernistas and Trumpkins."

Greetings, Jack. :2wave:

"The longest suicide note in history..." Now that was funny! :lamo :thumbs:
 

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That guy has some serious bags under his eyes. That's disqualifying. Don't elect politicians with serious baggage. It's a rule.
 

polgara

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That guy has some serious bags under his eyes. That's disqualifying. Don't elect politicians with serious baggage. It's a rule.

Greetings, humbolt. :2wave:

Disqualifying? Nah, it's become a requirement! :lamo
 

Jack Hays

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And with the Tories tearing themselves to pieces, he's a lot closer to power than you might think. Conservatives and Labour are current even in polling at 34% each, and that after countless hatchet jobs on Corbyn by the likes of the right-wing press that you've been quoting. A truly socialist Labour government isn't as remote a dream as you may wish.

What in the OP's history narrative would you count as a "hatchet job?"
 

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Aha! The Brits have their insane politicians as well. How close is this guy to becoming PM?

A million miles. Same as the predecessor, duffer Miliband. The 'die hards' just do not get the fact that most people these days are a blended version of one side or the other i.e. 'centralists'. Mark my words, the guy will NOT win the next election. He is that bad, the imminent implosion and infighting of the Conservative party will not be enough to place him in power. Fortunately.
 

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And with the Tories tearing themselves to pieces, he's a lot closer to power than you might think. Conservatives and Labour are current even in polling at 34% each, and that after countless hatchet jobs on Corbyn by the likes of the right-wing press that you've been quoting. A truly socialist Labour government isn't as remote a dream as you may wish.

AS you constantly remind me, polls are known to be wrong.
 

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That's true. Personally, I think Corbyn's much more popular than the polls suggest.

A few people think that. Had an unite meeting on Friday, and Claire Moody came along, it got on to Corbyn. She was aghast at about 90% of the audience, after a show of hands, didn't think Corbyn was right for Labour or the country. She was further taken back that about 70% of unite reps were planning to vote out of Europe. We had unites European officer give what some thought was a very one sided view. To be fair, I thought he was simply countering much of the misinformation.
 

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~ it's comforting, in a small way, to see silliness on the other side of the Atlantic as ~

We haven't engaged in "schadenfreunde" over here as far as I can remember? It may bite you in the bum before you know it.

~ A truly socialist Labour government isn't as remote a dream as you may wish.

~ He is that bad, the imminent implosion and infighting of the Conservative party will not be enough to place him in power ~

Isn't it interesting how Corbyn has been literally on holiday during the referendum debate? The Plaid Cymru spokeswoman on Question Time suggested he is actually on holiday quite a bit when needed. Boris Johnson on the other hand may have calculated this is his best chance to appeal to what he feels the dominant section of the Conservative party and his best choice was to take the Brexit side.

I wonder how much Corbyn feels this is his best chance, staying out of the fray to the point previous Labour leaders are calling out to Labour voters to come out and vote. If there is Brexit and the ensuing chaos of economic death while we renegotiate, the Conservative Party would shoulder the majority of the blame. Johnson would be a tarnished PM who cap in hand ends up signing a free movement deal with the EU and thus discredited and a liability for 2020 or thereabouts.

Johnson on the other hand is aware of how deep the split is in the Conservative Party on Europe and feels he should appeal to Brexit MPs and constituency and this was his best chance to position himself for the leadership. The lure of power in a diminished UK for either of these people is still power.

I don't think Corbyn is silly as the OP presents, he's calculated and there's zero cost to him in not engaging in the referendum.
 

Jack Hays

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We haven't engaged in "schadenfreunde" over here as far as I can remember? It may bite you in the bum before you know it.





Isn't it interesting how Corbyn has been literally on holiday during the referendum debate? The Plaid Cymru spokeswoman on Question Time suggested he is actually on holiday quite a bit when needed. Boris Johnson on the other hand may have calculated this is his best chance to appeal to what he feels the dominant section of the Conservative party and his best choice was to take the Brexit side.

I wonder how much Corbyn feels this is his best chance, staying out of the fray to the point previous Labour leaders are calling out to Labour voters to come out and vote. If there is Brexit and the ensuing chaos of economic death while we renegotiate, the Conservative Party would shoulder the majority of the blame. Johnson would be a tarnished PM who cap in hand ends up signing a free movement deal with the EU and thus discredited and a liability for 2020 or thereabouts.

Johnson on the other hand is aware of how deep the split is in the Conservative Party on Europe and feels he should appeal to Brexit MPs and constituency and this was his best chance to position himself for the leadership. The lure of power in a diminished UK for either of these people is still power.

I don't think Corbyn is silly as the OP presents, he's calculated and there's zero cost to him in not engaging in the referendum.

I'm neutral on Brexit but I'm firmly convinced Corbyn is a lunatic.
 

Andalublue

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Seems like a straightforward list.

It's a list alright, of straightforward lies and distortions. I'm not going to debunk them one by one, since it only takes a Google search to do it for you. Unsurprising that George Will and the FT wouldn't be fans.
 

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I'm neutral on Brexit but I'm firmly convinced Corbyn is a lunatic.

Lunatics are generally interesting. Corbyn is most definitely not interesting :lol:
 

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Aha! The Brits have their insane politicians as well. How close is this guy to becoming PM?

If the Torries manage to have a full blown civl war and split into fragments (not likely at all no matter how bloody the EU referendum becomes) then he could be elected but the rest of the Labour party hate him, well the pariamentary Labour party, so they could have a nice bloodless coup. That is the way of British politics.
 
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