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The Scorpion Pepper

Lutherf

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Last week I had a cousin in town and we went out doing tourist stuff which, down here, requires a trip to Tombstone. Just like any other tourist trap Tombstone affords the visitor an opportunity to spend money on stupid stuff. My choice of stupid involved Habanero infused olive oil and sea salt mixed with Trinidad Scorpion Pepper. I tried the oil in the store and was impressed that it had great heat but also fantastic flavor just like the Habanero is known for. I didn't try the salt.

Yesterday I decided to marinate some chicken in the Habanero oil for fajitas. I poured a couple of tablespoons of the oil in a baggie, added about a pound of chicken with a little garlic powder and black pepper. As I reached for the salt I remembered the Scorpion Pepper salt figured that if I was going to go for heat then it was time to try this gimmick. As I opened the jar of salt I got a little bit on my finger just because there was some salt dust on the seal. I figured I'd better try it before I salted the chicken so I licked my finger. In a few seconds, just from a few crystals and dust, I could tell this was no ordinary pepper. The heat was intense and just kept coming. It wasn't unbearable but I was mighty glad I hadn't ingested more than a tiny fraction of a pinch. Based on that I added one very small and tentative shake of this salt to the chicken and then regular salt just to make sure I got it salted.

I let it marinade for about 2 hours and then cooked up the fajitas. Now, as a guy who likes spicy hot food this worked out pretty doggone well. The chicken was hot enough to make my nose run and my eyes water but it also held its flavor so that I could still taste the peppers and onions. This stuff is no gimmick!

If you happen to run across Trinidad Scorpion Pepper I definitely recommend it but when I say "use it sparingly" I'm not joking. The 5oz jar of Scorpion Pepper salt I've got might well last me a year even if I'm using it regularly and the 1/4oz of dried peppers (about a dozen whole peppers) will probably last longer than that. Maybe this week I'll make a pot of chili with half a dried pepper in 3# of beef and see how that works.
 

Risky Thicket

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Last week I had a cousin in town and we went out doing tourist stuff which, down here, requires a trip to Tombstone. Just like any other tourist trap Tombstone affords the visitor an opportunity to spend money on stupid stuff. My choice of stupid involved Habanero infused olive oil and sea salt mixed with Trinidad Scorpion Pepper. I tried the oil in the store and was impressed that it had great heat but also fantastic flavor just like the Habanero is known for. I didn't try the salt.

Yesterday I decided to marinate some chicken in the Habanero oil for fajitas. I poured a couple of tablespoons of the oil in a baggie, added about a pound of chicken with a little garlic powder and black pepper. As I reached for the salt I remembered the Scorpion Pepper salt figured that if I was going to go for heat then it was time to try this gimmick. As I opened the jar of salt I got a little bit on my finger just because there was some salt dust on the seal. I figured I'd better try it before I salted the chicken so I licked my finger. In a few seconds, just from a few crystals and dust, I could tell this was no ordinary pepper. The heat was intense and just kept coming. It wasn't unbearable but I was mighty glad I hadn't ingested more than a tiny fraction of a pinch. Based on that I added one very small and tentative shake of this salt to the chicken and then regular salt just to make sure I got it salted.

I let it marinade for about 2 hours and then cooked up the fajitas. Now, as a guy who likes spicy hot food this worked out pretty doggone well. The chicken was hot enough to make my nose run and my eyes water but it also held its flavor so that I could still taste the peppers and onions. This stuff is no gimmick!

If you happen to run across Trinidad Scorpion Pepper I definitely recommend it but when I say "use it sparingly" I'm not joking. The 5oz jar of Scorpion Pepper salt I've got might well last me a year even if I'm using it regularly and the 1/4oz of dried peppers (about a dozen whole peppers) will probably last longer than that. Maybe this week I'll make a pot of chili with half a dried pepper in 3# of beef and see how that works.

Is the Scorpion Pepper salt manufactured here in Arizona?
 

Lutherf

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Is the Scorpion Pepper salt manufactured here in Arizona?

I'll check when I get back home. The oils are done here and they are VERY good. She had a wide selection of infused oils and infused Balsamic vinegars.

I think this is the same outfit - Tubac Olive Oil
 

beefheart

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I made chicken fajitas last night, I usually spice them up, I added a tiny bit of scotch bonnet pepper sauce...hot and deadly...mmm
 

PoS

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I think its quite easy to infuse oils, I would put raw garlic and peppers with my cane vinegar and I have made homemade limoncelo. All you really need is patience since you need a few months to allow the infusion to seep into the oil.
 

SocialD

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Last week I had a cousin in town and we went out doing tourist stuff which, down here, requires a trip to Tombstone. Just like any other tourist trap Tombstone affords the visitor an opportunity to spend money on stupid stuff. My choice of stupid involved Habanero infused olive oil and sea salt mixed with Trinidad Scorpion Pepper. I tried the oil in the store and was impressed that it had great heat but also fantastic flavor just like the Habanero is known for. I didn't try the salt.

Yesterday I decided to marinate some chicken in the Habanero oil for fajitas. I poured a couple of tablespoons of the oil in a baggie, added about a pound of chicken with a little garlic powder and black pepper. As I reached for the salt I remembered the Scorpion Pepper salt figured that if I was going to go for heat then it was time to try this gimmick. As I opened the jar of salt I got a little bit on my finger just because there was some salt dust on the seal. I figured I'd better try it before I salted the chicken so I licked my finger. In a few seconds, just from a few crystals and dust, I could tell this was no ordinary pepper. The heat was intense and just kept coming. It wasn't unbearable but I was mighty glad I hadn't ingested more than a tiny fraction of a pinch. Based on that I added one very small and tentative shake of this salt to the chicken and then regular salt just to make sure I got it salted.

I let it marinade for about 2 hours and then cooked up the fajitas. Now, as a guy who likes spicy hot food this worked out pretty doggone well. The chicken was hot enough to make my nose run and my eyes water but it also held its flavor so that I could still taste the peppers and onions. This stuff is no gimmick!

If you happen to run across Trinidad Scorpion Pepper I definitely recommend it but when I say "use it sparingly" I'm not joking. The 5oz jar of Scorpion Pepper salt I've got might well last me a year even if I'm using it regularly and the 1/4oz of dried peppers (about a dozen whole peppers) will probably last longer than that. Maybe this week I'll make a pot of chili with half a dried pepper in 3# of beef and see how that works.

I like a bit of spicy too. What I don't get though is the obsession among many to find the hottest peppers. scoville rating doesn't make things taste better I mean its not the capsaicin that is the source of flavor and often too much of it obscures the flavors.
 

Lutherf

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I like a bit of spicy too. What I don't get though is the obsession among many to find the hottest peppers. scoville rating doesn't make things taste better I mean its not the capsaicin that is the source of flavor and often too much of it obscures the flavors.

Of course hotter doesn't mean better but a pepper like the habanero has a great taste and really accents the food it's cooked with if used properly.
 

SocialD

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Of course hotter doesn't mean better but a pepper like the habanero has a great taste and really accents the food it's cooked with if used properly.

Yea I just mean that since the habanero people have been basically creating pepper hybrids, the ghost pepper, inifinity pepper, the naga viper pepper, the Trinidad scorpion pepper and the Carolina reaper pepper etc..
I guess its a hobby but as far as culinary use it diminishes.. a habanero tops out at around 350k scoville, the pepper we are talkingabout here the Trinidad scorpion is around 1.2 m so around 4 times hotter than the hotter varieties of habaneros.
 

beefheart

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Next time you are up in Phoenix, go to Los Dos Molinos.

Hot as hell, tasty as heaven...
 

Lutherf

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Yea I just mean that since the habanero people have been basically creating pepper hybrids, the ghost pepper, inifinity pepper, the naga viper pepper, the Trinidad scorpion pepper and the Carolina reaper pepper etc..
I guess its a hobby but as far as culinary use it diminishes.. a habanero tops out at around 350k scoville, the pepper we are talkingabout here the Trinidad scorpion is around 1.2 m so around 4 times hotter than the hotter varieties of habaneros.

Granted, the uses are kind of limited for this kind of thing but as long as people keep looking for "the hottest" somebody out there will keep growing them. It's kind of like 14% ABV beer and boutique "moonshine", there's a place for it but it's certainly not an every day thing for normal people.

I've experimented with crazy hot peppers combined with certain fruits as a glaze for chicken. Banana and peanut butter seem to work well as you still get the taste of the pepper without the burn.

As an aside, swishing a shot of vodka or tequila around your mouth after you eat one of these monstrosities helps too. In fact, if you take several shots of tequila after munching a few habaneros you'll hardly notice the pain at all.....at least until you wake up on the bathroom floor a few hours later.
 

SocialD

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Granted, the uses are kind of limited for this kind of thing but as long as people keep looking for "the hottest" somebody out there will keep growing them. It's kind of like 14% ABV beer and boutique "moonshine", there's a place for it but it's certainly not an every day thing for normal people.

I've experimented with crazy hot peppers combined with certain fruits as a glaze for chicken. Banana and peanut butter seem to work well as you still get the taste of the pepper without the burn.

As an aside, swishing a shot of vodka or tequila around your mouth after you eat one of these monstrosities helps too. In fact, if you take several shots of tequila after munching a few habaneros you'll hardly notice the pain at all.....at least until you wake up on the bathroom floor a few hours later.

If it gives you the burning sphincter like you could shoot flames out your arse then I generally don't eat it ;)
 

beerftw

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Last week I had a cousin in town and we went out doing tourist stuff which, down here, requires a trip to Tombstone. Just like any other tourist trap Tombstone affords the visitor an opportunity to spend money on stupid stuff. My choice of stupid involved Habanero infused olive oil and sea salt mixed with Trinidad Scorpion Pepper. I tried the oil in the store and was impressed that it had great heat but also fantastic flavor just like the Habanero is known for. I didn't try the salt.

Yesterday I decided to marinate some chicken in the Habanero oil for fajitas. I poured a couple of tablespoons of the oil in a baggie, added about a pound of chicken with a little garlic powder and black pepper. As I reached for the salt I remembered the Scorpion Pepper salt figured that if I was going to go for heat then it was time to try this gimmick. As I opened the jar of salt I got a little bit on my finger just because there was some salt dust on the seal. I figured I'd better try it before I salted the chicken so I licked my finger. In a few seconds, just from a few crystals and dust, I could tell this was no ordinary pepper. The heat was intense and just kept coming. It wasn't unbearable but I was mighty glad I hadn't ingested more than a tiny fraction of a pinch. Based on that I added one very small and tentative shake of this salt to the chicken and then regular salt just to make sure I got it salted.

I let it marinade for about 2 hours and then cooked up the fajitas. Now, as a guy who likes spicy hot food this worked out pretty doggone well. The chicken was hot enough to make my nose run and my eyes water but it also held its flavor so that I could still taste the peppers and onions. This stuff is no gimmick!

If you happen to run across Trinidad Scorpion Pepper I definitely recommend it but when I say "use it sparingly" I'm not joking. The 5oz jar of Scorpion Pepper salt I've got might well last me a year even if I'm using it regularly and the 1/4oz of dried peppers (about a dozen whole peppers) will probably last longer than that. Maybe this week I'll make a pot of chili with half a dried pepper in 3# of beef and see how that works.

I have known people who have eaten raw ghost scorpion trinidad etc peppers, one of them said sure why not. Now nothing spicy does anything for him, after spending 2 days in constant pain, habenero is a joke for him, and he can not taste alot of foods anymore, might have burned his tastebuds beyond repair or something.

Myself I prefer green jalapenos and red cayenne pepper. I like liousiana hotsauce which is cayenne instead of tabasco, or second is franks redhot, which also is alot of cayenne.
 

DifferentDrummr

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Last week I had a cousin in town and we went out doing tourist stuff which, down here, requires a trip to Tombstone. Just like any other tourist trap Tombstone affords the visitor an opportunity to spend money on stupid stuff. ...

What, you didn't take him to see "The THING?!?" :lamo
 
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