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Some fun with Australian English vs British vs American English.

Lovebug

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and not to forget the pronunciation of NZ. It came up this morning in a Covid thread, so I thought we could have some fun. I.e.
when you watch a Kiwi show and wonder why one would copy a litter, don't assume they are talking about puppies. A litter is what we commonly refer to as a letter, a bid isn't made in an auction house, but is something you sleep in... Yes, stay home, watch shows from around the world, and you will learn a lot.

A friend was stationed in New Zealand with the RAF some time ago. He related that when he wanted to buy cigarettes one time he was asked if he wanted 'tin'. Confusion reigned as cigarettes back then were sold both in tins of 50 or so, and in packets of ten.
 

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and not to forget the pronunciation of NZ. It came up this morning in a Covid thread, so I thought we could have some fun. I.e.
when you watch a Kiwi show and wonder why one would copy a litter, don't assume they are talking about puppies. A litter is what we commonly refer to as a letter, a bid isn't made in an auction house, but is something you sleep in... Yes, stay home, watch shows from around the world, and you will learn a lot.

I've noticed that Kiwis and to a lesser degree Aussies tend to use the long form of vowels, or it sounds that way to my ear. The word 'best', for example, sounds like 'beast' to me.
 

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I've noticed that Kiwis and to a lesser degree Aussies tend to use the long form of vowels, or it sounds that way to my ear. The word 'best', for example, sounds like 'beast' to me.

Yup. During my TV travels, from Scotland to Britain to Aussie land, the pronunciation of "murder" is completely different.

Had to look up "bird", "tosser", "grassing up" etc
 

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Yup. During my TV travels, from Scotland to Britain to Aussie land, the pronunciation of "murder" is completely different.

Had to look up "bird", "tosser", "grassing up" etc
Hah! I knew 'bird' because of watching the old early Rolling Stones interviews, when the came over for the first round of the 'British Invasion'!

I guess during that era we had 'chick', and they had 'bird'! :2razz:

Yep - crazy as it sounds, from those old Jagger/Richards/Daltrey/Townsend Interviews, I gained an appreciation & knowledge of East End Cockney!


 

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and not to forget the pronunciation of NZ. It came up this morning in a Covid thread, so I thought we could have some fun. I.e.
when you watch a Kiwi show and wonder why one would copy a litter, don't assume they are talking about puppies. A litter is what we commonly refer to as a letter, a bid isn't made in an auction house, but is something you sleep in... Yes, stay home, watch shows from around the world, and you will learn a lot.

There are several commonwealth words that mean something totally different in American English. For example did you know if you're in Ausie or GB you should never say, "I'm just stuffed!" after a meal? It means something really naughty!

Also "pissed" in American English means angry and in Commonwealth English means, "drunk".

The "boot" in Australia is the truck of your car....

That's all I can think of right now in my current condition :)
 

lurchadams

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This SNL/Kate McKinnon, James McAvoy sketch always cracks me up.. speaking of accents:

 

Lovebug

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There are several commonwealth words that mean something totally different in American English. For example did you know if you're in Ausie or GB you should never say, "I'm just stuffed!" after a meal? It means something really naughty!

Also "pissed" in American English means angry and in Commonwealth English means, "drunk".

The "boot" in Australia is the truck of your car....

That's all I can think of right now in my current condition :)

Brits are still using "fortnight", it isn't a term commonly used in the U.S.
 

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Brits are still using "fortnight", it isn't a term commonly used in the U.S.

"Fortnight" is a very popular X-box game right now - doesn't mean 2 weeks - I'm not sure why they called the game that!

I lived in Aus for a few years as a kid. There are words they use that few have heard in the states:

"tucker" means "food" or "chow" - usually kept in a "tucker bag".

"Fair dinkum" means "really!" when you're telling a tale.

and we all know what, "bugger!" means!
 

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They say **** and we say asshole.

Put the bag in the boot.

They'll want to lift your bonnet.
 

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Just a little tidbit from an Australian. Kangaroos are mostly prononced "Roos" period. Might be a little different in some parts but most people say Roos. :) No big deal.
 

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Curiously, many words which British (and commonwealth people) think of as Americanisms are actually Old English words preserved by the split after than nastiness in the 18th century. English continued to evolve inside the commonwealth, with regular and widespread communication, where in the USA not so much.

rubbish/trash
saucepan/skillet

Are both middle-English words, probably Norse in origin which fell into disuse in England beyond living memory.
 

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and not to forget the pronunciation of NZ. It came up this morning in a Covid thread, so I thought we could have some fun. I.e.
when you watch a Kiwi show and wonder why one would copy a litter, don't assume they are talking about puppies. A litter is what we commonly refer to as a letter, a bid isn't made in an auction house, but is something you sleep in... Yes, stay home, watch shows from around the world, and you will learn a lot.

Some people do get stressed about these differences in words. And there really is no need. My advice to them is that before they jump on the net to give some opinion on words they should first take the time to relax, sit back, light up and have a good long suck on a fag. It will do them good.
 

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Some people do get stressed about these differences in words. And there really is no need. My advice to them is that before they jump on the net to give some opinion on words they should first take the time to relax, sit back, light up and have a good long suck on a fag. It will do them good.

Fag, that's another one, and fringes.
 

Lovebug

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Who knows what collywobbles are?
 

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i'm an Anglophile, and i listen to a lot of UK narrated audio books. i'm probably more attuned to British slang, but i also like Irish, Scottish, and Australian slang. my wife and i have incorporated some of the it into out regular conversations, and i've used it here a bit, too. i look forward to learning more, as it is fun. much of it is just more satisfyingly insulting.
 

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Hah! I knew 'bird' because of watching the old early Rolling Stones interviews, when the came over for the first round of the 'British Invasion'!

I guess during that era we had 'chick', and they had 'bird'! :2razz:

Yep - crazy as it sounds, from those old Jagger/Richards/Daltrey/Townsend Interviews, I gained an appreciation & knowledge of East End Cockney!




Having lived all over the English speaking world, I find this gorgeous.

Guy Ritchie paid attention.
 

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Having lived all over the English speaking world, I find this gorgeous.

Guy Ritchie paid attention.
That was excellent, wasn't it?

Check out the really old interviews of the guys/bands I mentioned in my earlier posts. Preferably black & white interviews, which assures they're mid-sixties or earlier. East-end Cockney. They've all got it, and hadn't yet lost it.
 

Chomsky

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Curiously, many words which British (and commonwealth people) think of as Americanisms are actually Old English words preserved by the split after than nastiness in the 18th century. English continued to evolve inside the commonwealth, with regular and widespread communication, where in the USA not so much.

rubbish/trash
saucepan/skillet

Are both middle-English words, probably Norse in origin which fell into disuse in England beyond living memory.
That's interesting. Thanks for this!
 

Chomsky

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i'm an Anglophile, and i listen to a lot of UK narrated audio books. i'm probably more attuned to British slang, but i also like Irish, Scottish, and Australian slang. my wife and i have incorporated some of the it into out regular conversations, and i've used it here a bit, too. i look forward to learning more, as it is fun. much of it is just more satisfyingly insulting.
Did you see this, I posted up thread?


 
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