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Should congress pass a law subsidizing gas prices until the Ukraine issue calms down?

Should congress pass a law subsidizing gas prices until the Ukraine issue calms down?

  • Yes

    Votes: 6 12.0%
  • No

    Votes: 40 80.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 4 8.0%

  • Total voters
    50

tacomancer

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Should congress pass a law subsidizing gas prices until the Ukraine issue calms down?
 

Peacenik

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Should congress pass a law subsidizing gas prices until the Ukraine issue calms down?
No, but Congress should pass a subsidy for low income people to be able to drive where they need to go. Something to help them pay for the gas they need. All others (everyone) should adjust their driving habits and conserve to reduce energy usage.

Every type of energy saved is a Ukrainian life saved. Reducing demand reduces the price of energy. That helps Ukraine and Europe.

And it also helps Americans spend less on energy.

So, it's good all around.

It is unpatriotic and anti-social to waste energy.
 

Peacenik

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More effective would be the government dialing back on some of the gas taxes.

Federal tax is $.18/gallon and the state average is $.31/gallon.
Bad idea. That will only encourage increased energy usage. We need to reduce energy consumption. Save the planet for the grandchildren, and theirs too. We have no right to use up the whole planet in our time.
 

BirdinHand

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Bad idea. That will only encourage increased energy usage. We need to reduce energy consumption. Save the planet for the grandchildren, and theirs too. We have no right to use up the whole planet in our time.
Yeah, who cares if people are choosing between groceries and gas to drive to and from work. Suck it up for the grandkids.
 

ttwtt78640

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Yeah, who cares if people are choosing between groceries and gas to drive to and from work. Suck it up for the grandkids.

Hmm… who do you suppose will enjoy the resulting increase in the national debt and decrease in roadway maintenance from cutting (or eliminating) the motor fuel taxes?
 

ttwtt78640

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No, but Congress should pass a subsidy for low income people to be able to drive where they need to go. Something to help them pay for the gas they need. All others (everyone) should adjust their driving habits and conserve to reduce energy usage.

Every type of energy saved is a Ukrainian life saved. Reducing demand reduces the price of energy. That helps Ukraine and Europe.

And it also helps Americans spend less on energy.

So, it's good all around.

It is unpatriotic and anti-social to waste energy.

Are you kidding me? Your answer amounts to ‘no, but yes’.
 

BirdinHand

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Hmm… who do you suppose will enjoy the resulting increase in the national debt and decrease in roadway maintenance from cutting (or eliminating) the motor fuel taxes?
It is equal to about 1% of revenue in states...probably less than that in the federal government.(Less than 40B total)

The governments can't find pet projects to cut to give citizens relief? 1%.

Bullshit.
 

BirdinHand

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Why is the consumer always the one asked to make "cuts"?

Why can't government cut back THEIR spending and give Americans back some of THEIR money by cutting the gas tax?

NO to a subsidy that equates to MORE government spending.
 

BlueTex

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Suspend the gas tax for 180 days... Remind the US oil industry of this little poison pill in the legislation ending the ban on oil exports...

This broad language is accompanied by two important carve-outs. First, a savings clause makes clear that this language does not diminish the president’s authority to restrict crude oil exports to sanctioned countries, entities, and individuals. Second, an exception authorizes the president to once again “impose export licensing requirements or other restrictions” on crude exports for up to one year (although this term is renewable) when the president and the secretary of commerce find that crude oil exports have “caused sustained material oil supply shortages or sustained oil prices significantly above world market levels that are directly attributable to the export of crude oil produced in the United States.” The president must also find that such supply shortages or price increases are likely to “cause sustained material adverse employment effects in the United States.” Under this new statutory scheme, the president has the authority to act quickly, without additional authorization from Congress, to avert shortages like those experienced in the 1970s.

 

ttwtt78640

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It is equal to about 1% of revenue in states...probably less than that in the federal government.(Less than 40B total)

The governments can't find pet projects to cut to give citizens relief? 1%.

Bullshit.

That, of course, ignores any other tax revenue generated by state oil/gas production. In Texas, oil and gas direct taxes account for over 10% of total state tax revenue - and that is not counting the oil and gas industry employees contribution to state and local sales and property taxes.

Texas is a big state, and getting around it burns a lot of fuel. Texans use about 13 billion gallons of gasoline and 4.5 billion gallons of diesel fuel each year, as well as much smaller amounts of various alternative fuels such as compressed and liquefied natural gas. According to federal statistics, only eight nations used more gasoline and diesel than Texas in 2012.

That adds up to significant revenue for the state. Texas motor fuels taxes generated more than $3.4 billion in fiscal 2015, making them the fourth-largest source of state tax revenue.

Nearly all states, including Texas, use the bulk of this revenue for transportation projects. Under the Texas Constitution, after refunds and collection costs are subtracted, three-quarters of the state’s motor fuels tax revenue is used to build and maintain public roadways. The remainder goes to the state’s Available School Fund, which supports public education.


In his latest biennial revenue estimate, the state comptroller said 54.5% of the state’s general revenue during the current two-year period would come from sales taxes.

That’s the biggest source, but taxes on oil and gas make up a significant part of the state’s general revenue. Oil production taxes would account for 6.1%, and natural gas production taxes would bring in another 2.7%. Those severance taxes were expected to bring $2.86 billion this year and next into each of two big accounts, the State Highway Fund and the Economic Stabilization Fund (which is also known as the rainy day fund).

Taxes on motor fuel make up 1.7% of the state’s general revenue, but more of the money — more than $5 billion — is dedicated to transportation and public education. Those motor fuel taxes are based on volume and not price; for gasoline, for instance, it’s 20 cents per gallon, no matter what you’re paying for a gallon of gas.

 

BirdinHand

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That, of course, ignores any other tax revenue generated by state oil/gas production. In Texas, oil and gas direct taxes account for over 10% of total state tax revenue - and that is not counting the oil and gas industry employees contribution to state and local sales and property taxes.






Different gas taxes.

I'm talking about the tax per gallon paid by the consumer at the pump.
 

ttwtt78640

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Different gas taxes.

I'm talking about the tax per gallon paid by the consumer at the pump.

OK, that alone was 1.7% of tax revenue in Texas. It would also require each state’s legislature to act. Unlike the federal government, state governments can’t just print the funds to offset tax cuts.
 

LouC

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OK, that alone was 1.7% of tax revenue in Texas. It would also require each state’s legislature to act. Unlike the federal government, state governments can’t just print the funds to offset tax cuts.
Well here in my state there is a whopping surplus of cash so they could probably do that or at least cut the $0.33 per gallon State Sales Tax by some amount!

Our Governor in his January 10th State of the State address bragged about the State having $1.9 Billion in surplus cash.

With my last fill up a couple days ago I paid $68.56 with a State and Federal gas tax combined of $7.71 on that 14.907 gallons of gas.

Thank goodness for me I only have to fill up every 2 to 3 months.

I only drove 29 miles in February.

But for folks doing the daily commutes and all other necessary daily driving I truly feel for them!
 

BirdinHand

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OK, that alone was 1.7% of tax revenue in Texas. It would also require each state’s legislature to act. Unlike the federal government, state governments can’t just print the funds to offset tax cuts.
They can slash projects, etc. I'm sure that states can find ways to cut 1% of their budgets if they looked hard enough.

Between the state and federal taxes, you're talking $.40+ per gallon for most consumers. That would be a huge help for people that are being impacted by these absurd increases. Even if only for 6 months or a year...it would help alleviate some of the pressure on kitchen table budgets.
 

ttwtt78640

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No. If we want to give people money, just give people money. Don't subsidize behaviors we want people to do less of.

Hmm… wouldn’t simply giving people money discourage them from working (aka producing) to get (more of) it? I definitely elected to work less after I started getting Social Security retirement benefits.
 

ttwtt78640

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Well here in my state there is a whopping surplus of cash so they could probably do that or at least cut the $0.33 per gallon State Sales Tax by some amount!

Our Governor in his January 10th State of the State address bragged about the State having $1.9 Billion in surplus cash.

With my last fill up a couple days ago I paid $68.56 with a State and Federal gas tax combined of $7.71 on that 14.907 gallons of gas.

Thank goodness for me I only have to fill up every 2 to 3 months.

I only drove 29 miles in February.

But for folks doing the daily commutes and all other necessary daily driving I truly feel for them!

Yep, but (like I said) that is a state government decision.
 

ttwtt78640

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They can slash projects, etc. I'm sure that states can find ways to cut 1% of their budgets if they looked hard enough.

Between the state and federal taxes, you're talking $.40+ per gallon for most consumers. That would be a huge help for people that are being impacted by these absurd increases. Even if only for 6 months or a year...it would help alleviate some of the pressure on kitchen table budgets.

The federal government is currently increasing deficit spending. What, exactly, should be cut to avoid doing that?
 

Gatsby

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Hmm… wouldn’t simply giving people money discourage them from working (aka producing) to get (more of) it?
If it's means-tested (i.e. their payment is connected to keeping their income low), then yes, I think it would. If it's just a more-or-less universal payment, I don't think so.

But I don't really see the need for another universal relief payment right now, with the economy running hot and inflation running high. Seems counterproductive to me. I think the correct response to high gas prices is to do nothing.
I definitely elected to work less after I started getting Social Security retirement benefits.
If we had ongoing universal payments for everyone like SS retirement (e.g. a UBI) I think you are right that the long-term effect would be for people to work fewer hours.

One-time economic relief payments don't typically have that effect if they are structured properly, to my knowledge.
 
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