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Ruckus Taking Place In The Amazon Boardroom (1 Viewer)

Razoo

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Having faced shop floor labor rebellions at multiple warehouses this past year, Amazon is now confronting a new rebellion in the boardroom. Public pension-fund trustees in New York and Illinois are demanding that the company replace two members of its board of directors for failure to rein in skyrocketing injury rates among employees and massive employee turnover.

“The [Amazon] directors responsible for human capital management have utterly failed to do so,” says recently elected New York City Comptroller Brad Lander, who is leading the effort. “We have the belief that Amazon’s success depends on its 1.6 million workers.

As we have heard from workers on the toll the company has taken on their lives and bodies, the company’s response is to union bust. We don’t think this is consistent with the long-term values we have.”

Five New York City pension funds, the New York State Common Retirement Fund, and the Illinois State Treasurer joined the initial launch of the effort. All are long-term Amazon shareholders, with 1.7 million in combined Amazon shares valued at approximately $5.3 billion.


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What did these people think they were signing up for when they applied for a job to lift and shift heavy packages?
 
every hard worker deserves excellent pay. Hard workers are essential to all profiteers.
 
I can not speak to Amazon but at the company I work at a splinter removal and 2 Tylenol is an injury the same as cutting off a finger. Last year I had an injury go against me from an employee slipping on the plastic lunch bag he dropped.
 
every hard worker deserves excellent pay. Hard workers are essential to all profiteers.
Labor is just like any other commodity where value is determined by supply and demand. Ditch diggers I know work very hard, but unless they are in short supply... which with open borders isn't going to be a problem. Then their value is determined by market forces, not some idea that every Joe Schmo with ZERO skill sets deserves more money than they are worth.

I was at the grocery store the other day, and the market added 6 more self checkout stand. I figure that if your job is so lacking in skills that you can be replaced by ANYBODY walking in the door, then why should you expect more than minimum wage?
 
What did these people think they were signing up for when they applied for a job to lift and shift heavy packages?
Not working at a sweatshop and dying would be a start. Do you realize how much this costs the government to clean up the mess that these working conditions leave behind?
 
At nearly 5x the standard rate of warehousing musculoskeletal injuries, Amazon's injury rates are truly excessive and inexcusable: https://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-musculoskeletal-disorders-four-times-higher-2022-3

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I’m not sure that’s an apples to apples comparison. 20% of the entire US delivery market flows through Amazon warehouses and they aren’t shifting the same product. So it’s reasonable to expect more injury.
 
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I’m not sure that’s an apples to apples comparison. 20% of the entire US delivery market flows through Amazon warehouses and they aren’t shifting the same product. So it’s reasonable to expect more injury.
Remember, we're talking rates, not simply raw quantity; the issue is not simply that Amazon has more injuries but injuries that are vastly disproportionate.

Moreover, I don't think there's any specific product or products Amazon is shipping that's vastly more injury prone than the entire rest of the industry. Given the absolutely insane disparities in rates, and the countless allegations of worker mistreatment, it's pretty much a given that there's an issue with Amazon's process and worker utilization.
 
Remember, we're talking rates, not simply raw quantity; the issue is not simply that Amazon has more injuries but injuries that are vastly disproportionate.

Moreover, I don't think there's any specific product or products Amazon is shipping that's vastly more injury prone than the entire rest of the industry. Given the absolutely insane disparities in rates, and the countless allegations of worker mistreatment, it's pretty much a given that there's an issue with Amazon's process and worker utilization.
But disproportionate to what? What other warehouses are there and what is the weight and volume of product they’re shifting? Amazon processes packages up to multiple tons. That’s nothing like what, for example, the USPS is moving around.
 
But disproportionate to what? What other warehouses are there and what is the weight and volume of product they’re shifting? Amazon processes packages up to multiple tons. That’s nothing like what, for example, the USPS is moving around.
Then you use the proper equipment to handle it, such as forklifts and pallet jacks. Stop being a bootlicker for Bezos.
 
But disproportionate to what? What other warehouses are there and what is the weight and volume of product they’re shifting? Amazon processes packages up to multiple tons. That’s nothing like what, for example, the USPS is moving around.
Disproportionate to the entire rest of the industry that handles packages of all kinds, including up to multiple tons (which are typically moved with the use of injury precluding machinery anyways). To my knowledge, there is not a single other warehouser that has worse injury rates than Amazon, and I have no doubt that some of those are processing high risk packages (say industrial supply) with far greater regularity.
 
IT's in the best interest of the economy to keep PEOPLE employed. Those self serve devices do not pay taxes nor do they spend money. Frankly I avoid self service check outs.
 

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