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Robert F. Kennedy - On the death of Martin Luther King

Wehrwolfen

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Robert Kennedy's Speech on the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

[Excerpt]

"For those of you who are black - considering the evidence evidently is that there were white people who were responsible - you can be filled with bitterness, and with hatred, and a desire for revenge.

We can move in that direction as a country, in greater polarization - black people amongst blacks, and white amongst whites, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand, compassion and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.

But we have to make an effort in the United States, we have to make an effort to understand, to get beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He once wrote: "Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God."

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black."



Read more:
The History Place - Great Speeches Collection: Robert F. Kennedy Speech - On the death of Martin Luther King

For those of you who have animus in your hearts and have been watching and listening to the politicians in Washington and the race mongers of the Progressive Left, I offer this to you as sage advice and to remember the healing eloquence from a man who also was assassinated.
The case of the death of Trayvon Martin who attacked an armed man is disheartening and tragic. causing mayhem and deaths of others in his name. Why is it that our President Barack Hussein Obama II could not and would not try to emulate a speech similar to one that was made over 45 years ago, rather than to stir more racial animus.
 

Fletch

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The difference between RFK and Obama is that RFK saw no value in sowing division. It is a shame, too. Obama is such a great orator who wastes his skill on pettiness and small minded political advantage. He should have just read that Kennedy quote and left the stage. Oh well, just another missed opportunity for greatness by our bystander president.
 

Wehrwolfen

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The difference between RFK and Obama is that RFK saw no value in sowing division. It is a shame, too. Obama is such a great orator who wastes his skill on pettiness and small minded political advantage. He should have just read that Kennedy quote and left the stage. Oh well, just another missed opportunity for greatness by our bystander president.

Thank you,
That's exactly what I was trying to say. Could you or anyone else on this board come up a reason(s) why Obama has failed to ascend above the racial hatred?
 

Fletch

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Thank you,
That's exactly what I was trying to say. Could you or anyone else on this board come up a reason(s) why Obama has failed to ascend above the racial hatred?

Good question. Perhaps it is for the same reason that people like Sharpton and Jackson have never risen above it; although I doubt it because those two guys need racism to be relevant so they will never let it die. It is probably just pandering on his part. Like I said, he strikes me as small and petty without any sort of grand vision for the country--other than expanding the power and scope of the federal government as much as possible.
 

Wehrwolfen

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Good question. Perhaps it is for the same reason that people like Sharpton and Jackson have never risen above it; although I doubt it because those two guys need racism to be relevant so they will never let it die. It is probably just pandering on his part. Like I said, he strikes me as small and petty without any sort of grand vision for the country--other than expanding the power and scope of the federal government as much as possible.

Careful, or you too will be getting threats in your E-mails. I get them all the time.
 

Fiddytree

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The difference between RFK and Obama is that RFK saw no value in sowing division. It is a shame, too. Obama is such a great orator who wastes his skill on pettiness and small minded political advantage. He should have just read that Kennedy quote and left the stage. Oh well, just another missed opportunity for greatness by our bystander president.

Kennedy helped divide the party. What are you talking about?
 

pbrauer

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Robert Kennedy's Speech on the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

[Excerpt]

"For those of you who are black - considering the evidence evidently is that there were white people who were responsible - you can be filled with bitterness, and with hatred, and a desire for revenge.

We can move in that direction as a country, in greater polarization - black people amongst blacks, and white amongst whites, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand, compassion and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.

But we have to make an effort in the United States, we have to make an effort to understand, to get beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He once wrote: "Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God."

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black."



Read more:
The History Place - Great Speeches Collection: Robert F. Kennedy Speech - On the death of Martin Luther King

For those of you who have animus in your hearts and have been watching and listening to the politicians in Washington and the race mongers of the Progressive Left, I offer this to you as sage advice and to remember the healing eloquence from a man who also was assassinated.
The case of the death of Trayvon Martin who attacked an armed man is disheartening and tragic. causing mayhem and deaths of others in his name. Why is it that our President Barack Hussein Obama II could not and would not try to emulate a speech similar to one that was made over 45 years ago, rather than to stir more racial animus.
President Obama isn't stirring the racial animus, it's the Right who are demonizing Trayvon Martin.
 

Medusa

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isnt there anybody who will say king is naked ?
 

Medusa

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Robert Kennedy's Speech on the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

[Excerpt]

"For those of you who are black - considering the evidence evidently is that there were white people who were responsible - you can be filled with bitterness, and with hatred, and a desire for revenge.

We can move in that direction as a country, in greater polarization - black people amongst blacks, and white amongst whites, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand, compassion and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.

But we have to make an effort in the United States, we have to make an effort to understand, to get beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He once wrote: "Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God."

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black."



Read more:
The History Place - Great Speeches Collection: Robert F. Kennedy Speech - On the death of Martin Luther King

For those of you who have animus in your hearts and have been watching and listening to the politicians in Washington and the race mongers of the Progressive Left, I offer this to you as sage advice and to remember the healing eloquence from a man who also was assassinated.
The case of the death of Trayvon Martin who attacked an armed man is disheartening and tragic. causing mayhem and deaths of others in his name. Why is it that our President Barack Hussein Obama II could not and would not try to emulate a speech similar to one that was made over 45 years ago, rather than to stir more racial animus.

muslim black socialist obama is also a racist
 

Fletch

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President Obama isn't stirring the racial animus, it's the Right who are demonizing Trayvon Martin.
Like who? You have to remember, we right wing racists don't have a dog in this fight.
 

Woodman909

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Thank you,
That's exactly what I was trying to say. Could you or anyone else on this board come up a reason(s) why Obama has failed to ascend above the racial hatred?

Because like most die-hard liberals he must perpetuate the unrest to justify his existence and remain popular with the black community. Until our leaders can stop doing this, we will remain where we are, racially divided. We need leaders with courage, not just well honed oratory skills.

I am no fan of RFK. He was a womanizer who could not keep his zipper zipped as bad as his brother. What he did do right was hire good speech writers.
 

Fletch

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Because like most die-hard liberals he must perpetuate the unrest to justify his existence and remain popular with the black community. Until our leaders can stop doing this, we will remain where we are, racially divided. We need leaders with courage, not just well honed oratory skills.

I am no fan of RFK. He was a womanizer who could not keep his zipper zipped as bad as his brother. What he did do right was hire good speech writers.
Obama was and is in a unique position to actually help heal the racial divide in this country, but unfortunately, he has decided to take a pass. As unfortunate as that is for his legacy, it is more unfortunate for the nation.
 

Wehrwolfen

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Obama was and is in a unique position to actually help heal the racial divide in this country, but unfortunately, he has decided to take a pass. As unfortunate as that is for his legacy, it is more unfortunate for the nation.

Leading from behind will be Obama's legacy. He's proven that time and time again whether it on Domestic, or foreign issues.
 

CriticalThought

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Robert Kennedy's Speech on the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

[Excerpt]

"For those of you who are black - considering the evidence evidently is that there were white people who were responsible - you can be filled with bitterness, and with hatred, and a desire for revenge.

We can move in that direction as a country, in greater polarization - black people amongst blacks, and white amongst whites, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand, compassion and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.

But we have to make an effort in the United States, we have to make an effort to understand, to get beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He once wrote: "Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God."

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black."



Read more:
The History Place - Great Speeches Collection: Robert F. Kennedy Speech - On the death of Martin Luther King

For those of you who have animus in your hearts and have been watching and listening to the politicians in Washington and the race mongers of the Progressive Left, I offer this to you as sage advice and to remember the healing eloquence from a man who also was assassinated.
The case of the death of Trayvon Martin who attacked an armed man is disheartening and tragic. causing mayhem and deaths of others in his name. Why is it that our President Barack Hussein Obama II could not and would not try to emulate a speech similar to one that was made over 45 years ago, rather than to stir more racial animus.

This disgusts me. Obama spoke for 17 minutes on this issue in an eloquent way and people have taken a one minute segment where he affirmed himself as a member of the African American community and argued that he was divisive. LOOK AT HIS WHOLE SPEECH! Clearly a dishonest and partisan attack on a man who was trying to translate the pain of one community for the other. In the end YOU are the one being divisive.
 

Wehrwolfen

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This disgusts me. Obama spoke for 17 minutes on this issue in an eloquent way and people have taken a one minute segment where he affirmed himself as a member of the African American community and argued that he was divisive. LOOK AT HIS WHOLE SPEECH! Clearly a dishonest and partisan attack on a man who was trying to translate the pain of one community for the other. In the end YOU are the one being divisive.

Eloquent way? Oh yeah making race an issue in America more intense. Zimmerman was tried in a court where the prosecution attempted to use every dirty trick to persecute not prosecute a man who in defense of losing his life had to kill another man. Yes young but fully capable of bashing Zimmerman's head into the concrete. Will the prosecutors be admonished for their breach in ethics? We will see.
I laugh at Progressive people that continue to tell us it really raining while they pee down your leg.
 

pbrauer

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This disgusts me. Obama spoke for 17 minutes on this issue in an eloquent way and people have taken a one minute segment where he affirmed himself as a member of the African American community and argued that he was divisive. LOOK AT HIS WHOLE SPEECH! Clearly a dishonest and partisan attack on a man who was trying to translate the pain of one community for the other. In the end YOU are the one being divisive.

Yes, he is the being divisive, here is the relevant part of Obama's speech:

You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago. And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away.

There are very few African American men in this country who haven't had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store. That includes me. There are very few African American men who haven't had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars. That happens to me -- at least before I was a senator. There are very few African Americans who haven't had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off. That happens often.

And I don't want to exaggerate this, but those sets of experiences inform how the African American community interprets what happened one night in Florida. And it’s inescapable for people to bring those experiences to bear. The African American community is also knowledgeable that there is a history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws -- everything from the death penalty to enforcement of our drug laws. And that ends up having an impact in terms of how people interpret the case.
 

Wehrwolfen

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Yes, he is the being divisive, here is the relevant part of Obama's speech:

You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago. And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away.

There are very few African American men in this country who haven't had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store. That includes me. There are very few African American men who haven't had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars. That happens to me -- at least before I was a senator. There are very few African Americans who haven't had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off. That happens often.

And I don't want to exaggerate this, but those sets of experiences inform how the African American community interprets what happened one night in Florida. And it’s inescapable for people to bring those experiences to bear. The African American community is also knowledgeable that there is a history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws -- everything from the death penalty to enforcement of our drug laws. And that ends up having an impact in terms of how people interpret the case.

So what you're saying is that it would have been better for Trayvon to have split open Zimmerman's head spilling his brains on the concrete, killing him. I get it. It's okay to shoot a "White Hispanic" 13 month old boy three times in the face, shoot a white teenage kid, or jump a white guy and three punks throwing him into heavy traffic. But I also know the other side too. Neither side is pretty. You and I both know it. Was Zimmerman justified? A jury said yes and pronounced him not guilty. Case closed.
 
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pbrauer

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:bringit:blowup:
So what you're saying is that it would have been better for Trayvon to have split open Zimmerman's head spilling his brains on the concrete, killing him. I get it.
:aliens3:
 

CriticalThought

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Yes, he is the being divisive, here is the relevant part of Obama's speech:

You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago. And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away.

There are very few African American men in this country who haven't had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store. That includes me. There are very few African American men who haven't had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars. That happens to me -- at least before I was a senator. There are very few African Americans who haven't had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off. That happens often.

And I don't want to exaggerate this, but those sets of experiences inform how the African American community interprets what happened one night in Florida. And it’s inescapable for people to bring those experiences to bear. The African American community is also knowledgeable that there is a history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws -- everything from the death penalty to enforcement of our drug laws. And that ends up having an impact in terms of how people interpret the case.

So he is divisive for pointing out empirical statistical facts and trying to interpret for general society why the African American community may view this situation differently given their history and current experiences? I was wrong. This was not malicious, it just went over your heads. Obama and myself gave you too much credit.
 

pbrauer

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So he is divisive for pointing out empirical statistical facts and trying to interpret for general society why the African American community may view this situation differently given their history and current experiences? I was wrong. This was not malicious, it just went over your heads. Obama and myself gave you too much credit.

OMG I made a typo, I was agreeing with you, I even highlighted the portion in his speech. Here is what I wrote:

Yes, he is the being divisive, here is the relevant part of Obama's speech

And here is what I meant to write:

Yes, he isn't the being divisive, here is the relevant part of Obama's speech
 

CriticalThought

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OMG I made a typo, I was agreeing with you, I even highlighted the portion in his speech. Here is what I wrote:



And here is what I meant to write:

Ohhhhh. :blushing2
 

shrubnose

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Robert Kennedy's Speech on the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

[Excerpt]

"For those of you who are black - considering the evidence evidently is that there were white people who were responsible - you can be filled with bitterness, and with hatred, and a desire for revenge.

We can move in that direction as a country, in greater polarization - black people amongst blacks, and white amongst whites, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand, compassion and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.

But we have to make an effort in the United States, we have to make an effort to understand, to get beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He once wrote: "Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God."

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black."



Read more:
The History Place - Great Speeches Collection: Robert F. Kennedy Speech - On the death of Martin Luther King

For those of you who have animus in your hearts and have been watching and listening to the politicians in Washington and the race mongers of the Progressive Left, I offer this to you as sage advice and to remember the healing eloquence from a man who also was assassinated.
The case of the death of Trayvon Martin who attacked an armed man is disheartening and tragic. causing mayhem and deaths of others in his name. Why is it that our President Barack Hussein Obama II could not and would not try to emulate a speech similar to one that was made over 45 years ago, rather than to stir more racial animus.




Wehrwolfen is one person who could learn a lot from both Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr.




I doubt that he ever will, since he seems to think that he knows it all.

Let's wait and see if his posts improve,
 

Mason66

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The difference between RFK and Obama is that RFK saw no value in sowing division. It is a shame, too. Obama is such a great orator who wastes his skill on pettiness and small minded political advantage. He should have just read that Kennedy quote and left the stage. Oh well, just another missed opportunity for greatness by our bystander president.

I wish people would stop saying he is a great orator.

This man knows how to read a teleprompter and repeat the words written, just as they are written, corpseman.

When he is left to speak on his own he falls all over the words with more Uhs than normal.
 
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