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RIP: Freedom of Speech

Movies used to be fun to watch because they were a break from reality. It now seems as if some movies are turning out to be a glimpse into the future.

For those of you who have never seen it, Minority Report was a movie about the head detective for a “pre-crime” unit which averted crime before it happened. While the movie used three seers with precognitive abilities, the United States is currently using seemingly innocuous avenues such as Facebook and Twitter. Let’s dive in a little bit and see how freaked out we get.

For government officials to not only arrest Brandon Raub for doing nothing more than exercising his First Amendment rights but to actually force him to undergo psychological evaluations and detain him against his will goes against every constitutional principle this country was founded upon. This should be a wake-up call to Americans that the police state is here. [emphasis added]”

This quote came from John W. Whitehead, president of The Rutherford Institute. The Rutherford Institute is a civil liberties organization which provides free legal services to people whose constitutional and human rights have been threatened or violated. Most of you are probably unaware that a 26-year-old former Marine was arrested and tossed into a psychiatric hospital for posts he made to Facebook. Certainly, quite a few of Brandon’s posts were critical of the government and called for legal action against many officials, but this type of speech was the primary intent of the First Amendment.

For the life of me I cannot recall who said this, but the First Amendment was not created to protect popular opinion, it was created to protect unpopular opinion. For years, we have been warning people of the potential to be incarcerated for the sole crime of disagreeing with the government. Not only is the writing on the walls, but the government is all but daring people to stand up to it. Consider the following:


From The Guardian:

A software engineer in my Facebook community wrote recently about his outrage that when he visited Disneyland, and went on a ride, the theme park offered him the photo of himself and his girlfriend to buy – with his credit card information already linked to it. He noted that he had never entered his name or information into anything at the theme park, or indicated that he wanted a photo, or alerted the humans at the ride to who he and his girlfriend were – so, he said, based on his professional experience, the system had to be using facial recognition technology. He had never signed an agreement allowing them to do so, and he declared that this use was illegal. He also claimed that Disney had recently shared data from facial-recognition technology with the United States military.

Yes, I know: it sounds like a paranoid rant.

Except that it turned out to be true. News21, supported by the Carnegie and Knight foundations, reports that Disney sites are indeed controlled by face-recognition technology, that the military is interested in the technology, and that the face-recognition contractor, Identix, has contracts with the US government – for technology that identifies individuals in a crowd.

So what does it all mean?

People are inherently lazy. If they can take their cues from someone else and not have to invest any time in determining the facts for themselves, they will choose that path every day of the week. The well-being of not only the United States, but the vast majority of the globe is on the precipice of disaster. All I can say is be prepared.

Banks are failing. Debt levels are about to implode. Anger is rising. Economic stability is being undermined. Children are being trained to be robots. Freedom is an endangered species.

Many people have suggested getting out while the getting is good, most have recommended keeping a low profile, and just about everyone warns against holding too many assets in fiat currencies. I considered the merits and have determined that Liberty is only achieved through perseverance and strife. I will stay, and I will fight.

We have a natural right to make use of our pens as of our tongue, at our peril, risk and hazard.” – Voltaire.
 

Schweddy

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They are not conspiracies if they are wrapped in facts.
 

Black Dog

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I like what you have to say except one thing. The person on facebook was an active member of the military who clearly violated the UCMJ. He was not a regular citizen. Regular citizens post similar crap all day and don't get detained etc. Military personal give up many rights to join the military. This is clear from the moment you sign up.
 

pimptight

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I really think everyone needs to wake up to what is going on right now.

Every person in this country needs to know what the relationship between Trapwire, the NSA, and Stratfor. This is from the Wiki releases, a executive at Stratfor commenting on the "need" for Trapwire:

Regarding SF landmarks of interest--they need something like Trapwire more for threats from activists than from terror threats. Both are useful, but the activists are ever present around here.

Trapwire and data mining: What we know | Privacy SOS

If Trapwire doesn't scare you than perhaps these other stories will.

On NSA dreams: “NSA Boss Wants More Control Over the Net: The Internet should be adapted to allow for oversight by the National Security Agency, the organization’s boss says” (Technology Review, MIT, July 27, 2012)

On NSA vacuum style digital surveillance: “HOPE 9: Whistleblower Binney says the NSA has dossiers on nearly every US citizen” (NetworkWorld, July 15, 2012)

On the feds using our cellphones as bugs: “Ninth Circuit OKs Feds Use of Cellphones as Roving Bugs” (The New American, July 28, 2012)

On impunity and secrecy in spying: “The Feds Violated the Constitution but the Administration Won’t Say How” (The Atlantic, July 24, 2012)

On the National Counter Terrorism Center (NCTC) collecting unimaginably large amounts of data about every single person and storing it for a very long time: “The Biggest New Spying Program You’ve Probably Never Heard Of” (ACLU, July 30, 2012)

On impunity for warrantless spying on a mass scale: “Appeals Court OKs Warrantless Wiretapping” (Wired, August 7, 2012)

On face recognition: “FBI’s Facial Recognition is Coming to a State Near You” (EFF, August 8, 2012)

On the Microsoft and NYPD attempt to recreate “Total Information Awareness”: “The NYPD’s Domain Awareness System Is Watching You” (New York Magazine, August 9, 2012)

Trapwire and data mining: What we know | Privacy SOS
 
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