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Real Heroes

What if...?

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I think those people working to put the genie back in bottle in Japan should be honored for their bravery. No soldier has ever faced possible death more bravely. And radiation is a terrible way to die.

We should know who these people are, so we can let them know we appreciate the risks they are taking for all of us.

Makes me proud to be a human every time I see this kind of bravery.
 

Andalublue

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I think those people working to put the genie back in bottle in Japan should be honored for their bravery. No soldier has ever faced possible death more bravely. And radiation is a terrible way to die.

We should know who these people are, so we can let them know we appreciate the risks they are taking for all of us.V

Makes me proud to be a human every time I see this kind of bravery.
Very well said. I'm in awe at that level of bravery.
 

Ed Gein

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It's not bravery, it's far more intellectual than that, it's called honor. It's the kind of thing we see now and again in some stunning act we ourselves cannot imagine we would necessarily have the nut sack to engage in.

There is national honor displayed throughout this tragedy, an honor we ourselves see only in small comparable measure. In Japan, it is just, the way. As much as I feel tremendous respect for the Japanese people here, I can't help but feel a degree of disgust when thinking back on Katrina.
 

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What we are seeing is what happens in a society with core values and children are still raised for the most part by both parents and values are instilled in them we don't see here any more

If you think about it, the young people and everyone in this Nation we that way back at the start of WW-II.

Today in our news we has riots, and unrest in streets with people who seem to be looking for an excuse to break something and hurt people. We see it here on this forum akk the time with the name calling and personal attacks.

I admire the hell out of the whole society of Japan with a extra salute to the rescue workers and those at the Fukushima power plant.
 

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Can't add much to these comments, all true. The Japanese are acting impressively.
 

MaggieD

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They're already being dubbed the Fukushima Fifty: the men who are trading shifts to try to prevent the full meltdown of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear facility. On their shoulders rests the safety -- and perhaps the lives -- of thousands of Japanese citizens. When the facility's 800 employees were evacuated last week following the earthquake and tsunami, these were the men who stayed behind to try to cool down the reactors, to fight the fires and to prevent further explosions.

Some have said the only term to describe their work is a suicide mission. Others believe there is a good chance these men can still emerge from this work without any ill effects.

Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan offered a tribute to the men this week, saluting their efforts and courage.

"Those with TEPCO and related entities are working to pour water, making their best effort even at this moment, without even thinking twice about the danger," Kan said.

In a surprising move on Wednesday, Japan's Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare decided to raise the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers. It said the hike was needed to prevent the crisis at the power plant from worsening.

The workers are likely wearing full bodysuits and air packs to reduce the exposure. But Gundersen said some forms of radiation can penetrate any gear. Because so little information is being released, it's not clear whether the Fukushima Fifty have fully accepted the danger they're in.

Shan Nair, a British nuclear safety expert who was part of a panel that advised the European Commission on its response to the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, tells Time.com that during the Chernobyl disaster, many first responders to the incident knew they faced certain death. But this situation may be different, he says. At Chernobyl, there was a massive explosion, and a resulting radioactive cloud. So far at Fukushima, even the spike of radiation being reported may not be fatal.

Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan offered a tribute to the men this week, saluting their efforts and courage: "Those with TEPCO and related entities are working to pour water, making their best effort even at this moment, without even thinking twice about the danger," Kan said.

In a surprising move on Wednesday, Japan's Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare decided to raise the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers. It said the hike was needed to prevent the crisis at the power plant from worsening.

The Ministry raised the maximum allowable exposure for nuclear workers to 250 millisieverts from 100 millisieverts. It described the move as "unavoidable due to the circumstances." Still, even at 250 mSv, that's still below the level at which people would show symptoms of radiation poisoning.

Shan Nair, a British nuclear safety expert who was part of a panel that advised the European Commission on its response to the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, tells Time.com that during the Chernobyl disaster, many first responders to the incident knew they faced certain death. Nair says the helicopter pilots who dumped sand on the burning core at Chernobyl knew they were going to die. And in fact, all did die. But this situation may be different, he says. At Chernobyl, there was a massive explosion, and a resulting radioactive cloud. So far at Fukushima, even the spike of radiation being reported may not be fatal.

"We don't know what the radiation levels are inside the plant but reports of a 400 millisievert figure suggests that it's not a suicide mission for the 50 workers who have stayed. He notes that the rotation of shifts allows for "dose sharing" so that no one team of workers receives an unsafe dose for any longer than needed.

"It is still a risky operation, however," Nair added.
Heroes all. Great post, What If.
 
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What if...?

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It's not bravery, it's far more intellectual than that, it's called honor. It's the kind of thing we see now and again in some stunning act we ourselves cannot imagine we would necessarily have the nut sack to engage in.

There is national honor displayed throughout this tragedy, an honor we ourselves see only in small comparable measure. In Japan, it is just, the way. As much as I feel tremendous respect for the Japanese people here, I can't help but feel a degree of disgust when thinking back on Katrina.
That's what I was trying to say, that facing death with eyes wide open is my kind of bravery. Not that battlefield, in the moment bravery is less "honorable", just that "knowing" you may very well die, or never be safe to have children, and doing it anyway, is imho, the best it gets.

Hope they don't have to pay that price for what they are doing for all of us.
 

DiAnna

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I have been overwhelmed with admiration at the way Japan's entire populace has dealt with this catastrophe. They are working together, working for each other as a team, no whiney complaints at tv cameras, just stoic acceptance and on to save the next person, solve the next problem.

Those 50 nuclear workers... makes my eyes moist to know that they most certainly understand that they are giving up their own lives in the hope of saving others. The radiation numbers around that plant is now so high that there is no possibility of flying aircraft close enough for water drops. Clearly, it's high enough to be deadly for the humans inside.
 
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