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Reading insurance policies . . .

MaggieD

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Ever read yours? :rofl Of course you haven't. It's written for lawyers, not for you. I think insurance policies, especially, should have to unlegalese their contracts with a cover sheet that lists exclusions in plain English. And policy holders should be required to sign indicating they've read them. Here's an example why:

Florida homeowner faces thousands in damage after pool rises from ground | Fox News

In short, a homeowner in Florida found himself not covered by insurance when his pool rose from the ground (ostensibly from ground water). It did tens of thousands of dollars of damage to his home.

pool_problems.jpg
 

Gipper

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Ever read yours? :rofl Of course you haven't. It's written for lawyers, not for you. I think insurance policies, especially, should have to unlegalese their contracts with a cover sheet that lists exclusions in plain English. And policy holders should be required to sign indicating they've read them. Here's an example why:

Florida homeowner faces thousands in damage after pool rises from ground | Fox News

In short, a homeowner in Florida found himself not covered by insurance when his pool rose from the ground (ostensibly from ground water). It did tens of thousands of dollars of damage to his home.

pool_problems.jpg

Usually water-based damage is not covered in a typical policy. This is why we have flood insurance.
 

MaggieD

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Usually water-based damage is not covered in a typical policy. This is why we have flood insurance.

Yeah, well, this had nothing to do with flood damage.
 

Gipper

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Yeah, well, this had nothing to do with flood damage.

Flood insurance isn't just about your garden-variety definition of flood. That's why I said water-based damage, not just floods.
 

MaggieD

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Flood insurance isn't just about your garden-variety definition of flood. That's why I said water-based damage, not just floods.

Okay, fine. But how about staying on thread topic?
 

longview

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It seems to me that since the Insurance company offered her $1,500,
roughly the cost of sending out one of their engineers to determine the damage was caused by ground water.
They were admitting some liability, now they are just discussing the extent of the liability.
I think most Home owner policies do not cover foundation repair, and this is likely foundation
damage.
 

MaggieD

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It seems to me that since the Insurance company offered her $1,500,
roughly the cost of sending out one of their engineers to determine the damage was caused by ground water.
They were admitting some liability, now they are just discussing the extent of the liability.
I think most Home owner policies do not cover foundation repair, and this is likely foundation
damage.

Yeah, and getting the pool back in the ground. I remember hearing that draining an inground swimming pool is a job for the professionals, so I looked it up. It is dangerous . . . a real probability of the pool doing exactly what the pool did here. They shoulda' Googled.
 

longview

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Yeah, and getting the pool back in the ground. I remember hearing that draining an inground swimming pool is a job for the professionals, so I looked it up. It is dangerous . . . a real probability of the pool doing exactly what the pool did here. They shoulda' Googled.
Yep, Some areas are worse than others, I have drained mine for cleaning twice in 10 years,
but my water table is at 22 feet, well below the bottom of the pool.
 

davidtaylorjr

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Yeah, and getting the pool back in the ground. I remember hearing that draining an inground swimming pool is a job for the professionals, so I looked it up. It is dangerous . . . a real probability of the pool doing exactly what the pool did here. They shoulda' Googled.

So was it operator error?
 

Lord Tammerlain

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Yeah, and getting the pool back in the ground. I remember hearing that draining an inground swimming pool is a job for the professionals, so I looked it up. It is dangerous . . . a real probability of the pool doing exactly what the pool did here. They shoulda' Googled.

So the pool is not connected to the sewer system?

A surprise to me
 

MaggieD

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So the pool is not connected to the sewer system?

A surprise to me

Oh, never. I can't IMAGINE a town letting anyone empty a pool into the sanitary sewers. In our town, that'd probably get one put in jail. A typical 21-ft pool would hold about 25,000 gallons of water. The average household usage is probably 3,000 gallons a month. I would seriously doubt it could be legally dumped into the storm drains since that water doesn't get treated.
 

Lord Tammerlain

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Oh, never. I can't IMAGINE a town letting anyone empty a pool into the sanitary sewers. In our town, that'd probably get one put in jail. A typical 21-ft pool would hold about 25,000 gallons of water. The average household usage is probably 3,000 gallons a month. I would seriously doubt it could be legally dumped into the storm drains since that water doesn't get treated.

Not many people up here in Canada have pools (indoor or outdoor). I would never have thought the water in a pool is the same water (with replacement for evaporation) that would have been there months ago
 

mike2810

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First, my wife and I do read the fine print in all of our insurance policies. If we don't understand we ask our agent for clarification.

Back to pools. The Phoenix metro area as thousands of pools. They even post guidelines for pool draining including draining into the homes sewer cleanout.

Draining and Backwashing Your Pool - Official Site of the City of Phoenix

Pool water is basically high chlorinated city water. No big deal for the city water treatment system to handle it.

When we lived in Phoenix and had a pool, we definitely talked to our agent on what is covered and what type of policy we needed to be insured. This included liability issues, damage to home, damage to pool, and possible damage to neighbors.

imo, it pays to go with a good insurance company. cheapest is not always the best. Like a person who takes out just liability insurance for a car. Totals the car and wonders why the insurance company won't pay for the car.
 

MaggieD

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First, my wife and I do read the fine print in all of our insurance policies. If we don't understand we ask our agent for clarification.

Back to pools. The Phoenix metro area as thousands of pools. They even post guidelines for pool draining including draining into the homes sewer cleanout.

Draining and Backwashing Your Pool - Official Site of the City of Phoenix

Pool water is basically high chlorinated city water. No big deal for the city water treatment system to handle it.

When we lived in Phoenix and had a pool, we definitely talked to our agent on what is covered and what type of policy we needed to be insured. This included liability issues, damage to home, damage to pool, and possible damage to neighbors.

imo, it pays to go with a good insurance company. cheapest is not always the best. Like a person who takes out just liability insurance for a car. Totals the car and wonders why the insurance company won't pay for the car.

I'm amazed. I suppose your sewer treatment facilities are run by people who have a more enlightened approach since they have so many to deal with. ?? My town would skin people alive if they caught people doing that. Maybe they just don't have the capacity.

As for reading the fine print? Good On You!!! It's what we should all do, but most of us don't.
 
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