• Please keep all posts on the Rittenhouse verdict here: Rittenhouse Verdict. Note the moderator warnings in the thread. The thread will be heavily moderated with a zero tolerance policy for any baiting, flaming, trolling or other rule breaks. Stick to the topic and not the other posters. Thank you.
  • This is a political forum that is non-biased/non-partisan and treats every person's position on topics equally. This debate forum is not aligned to any political party. In today's politics, many ideas are split between and even within all the political parties. Often we find ourselves agreeing on one platform but some topics break our mold. We are here to discuss them in a civil political debate. If this is your first visit to our political forums, be sure to check out the RULES. Registering for debate politics is necessary before posting. Register today to participate - it's free!

Police interrogation is cruel, but not unusual

Celebrity

DP Veteran
Joined
May 13, 2016
Messages
5,257
Reaction score
761
Location
VT, USA
Gender
Undisclosed
Political Leaning
Undisclosed
How Police Interrogation Works | HowStuffWorks

Ever since beating and deprivation of food were outlawed as an interrogation strategy, we've been searching for new ways to oppress people who are in the custody of law enforcement. Taking a law abiding citizen into custody isn't illegal; suspects need not be guilty of a crime to undergo interrogation. What are some modern interrogation techniques that can be used to break down a suspect, in order to get them to snap if they are guilty of a crime, or if they simply have relevant information that they may not be willing to share? I think of an interrogation as a vice, it's intended to squeeze information out of an informant.

On a related note, I recently watched a video in which a police officer tased Patrick Mumford. Mr. Mumford was being questioned by the police, who thought that he bore a resemblance to someone for whom there was a warrant to be served. In the video you can clearly see that the officer at no point asked Mr. Mumford his name, though they claimed they asked three times when confronted by a neighbor, and then increased that claim to four times.

 

Captain Adverse

Classical Liberal Sage
DP Veteran
Joined
Jun 22, 2013
Messages
16,636
Reaction score
21,916
Location
Mid-West USA
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Other
How Police Interrogation Works | HowStuffWorks

Ever since beating and deprivation of food were outlawed as an interrogation strategy, we've been searching for new ways to oppress people who are in the custody of law enforcement. Taking a law abiding citizen into custody isn't illegal; suspects need not be guilty of a crime to undergo interrogation. What are some modern interrogation techniques that can be used to break down a suspect, in order to get them to snap if they are guilty of a crime, or if they simply have relevant information that they may not be willing to share? I think of an interrogation as a vice, it's intended to squeeze information out of an informant.

On a related note, I recently watched a video in which a police officer tased Patrick Mumford. Mr. Mumford was being questioned by the police, who thought that he bore a resemblance to someone for whom there was a warrant to be served. In the video you can clearly see that the officer at no point asked Mr. Mumford his name, though they claimed they asked three times when confronted by a neighbor, and then increased that claim to four times.


Correction: The officer did ask him "what's your name" at .43 in the video.

The suspect also resisted, and continued to resist.

This is what I don't understand about such reactions, especially when someone has previously dealt with the law. (He states he just got back from seeing his probation officer).

How about people learning how to deal with a police encounter?
 
Last edited:

Celebrity

DP Veteran
Joined
May 13, 2016
Messages
5,257
Reaction score
761
Location
VT, USA
Gender
Undisclosed
Political Leaning
Undisclosed
Correction: The officer did ask him "what's your name" ad .43 in the video.

The suspect also resisted, and continued to resist.

This is what I don't understand about such reactions, especially when someone has previously dealt with the law. (He states he just got back from seeing his probation officer).

Thank you for pointing that out. The officers did ask three times. Patrick also mentioned that his name was Patrick.
 

Dittohead not!

master political analyst
DP Veteran
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
51,847
Reaction score
33,760
Location
The Golden State
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
When the suspect hears, "You have the right to remain silent..." why doesn't he? Who wants to be browbeaten and told over and over how guilty he is? Just say, "I want a lawyer," and the interrogation is over.

And yet. people confess to crimes that they haven't committed. Amazing
 

Celebrity

DP Veteran
Joined
May 13, 2016
Messages
5,257
Reaction score
761
Location
VT, USA
Gender
Undisclosed
Political Leaning
Undisclosed
The version I saw earlier said something about how the officer never asked Patrick for ID. I guess that's what I meant to say.

The officers asked for his name and he gave it to them. I'm not sure whether any laws were broken by arresting Patrick, but it's not clear why he was arrested. The officers never asked for his ID, though they later claimed that they did. If they had asked for some form of documentation, that would be different. Since they didn't ask for documentation, there was no reason to escalate to physical aggression toward Mr. Mumford.
 

Skeptic Bob

DP Veteran
Joined
Oct 6, 2014
Messages
16,626
Reaction score
19,488
Location
Texas
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Libertarian - Left
When the suspect hears, "You have the right to remain silent..." why doesn't he? Who wants to be browbeaten and told over and over how guilty he is? Just say, "I want a lawyer," and the interrogation is over.

And yet. people confess to crimes that they haven't committed. Amazing

True. But keep in mind half the population has an IQ below 100.
 

Abbazorkzog

Zapatista Libertarian
Banned
DP Veteran
Joined
Oct 20, 2014
Messages
12,199
Reaction score
4,079
Location
#TrumpWasAnInsideJob
Gender
Undisclosed
Political Leaning
Centrist
How Police Interrogation Works | HowStuffWorks

Ever since beating and deprivation of food were outlawed as an interrogation strategy, we've been searching for new ways to oppress people who are in the custody of law enforcement. Taking a law abiding citizen into custody isn't illegal; suspects need not be guilty of a crime to undergo interrogation. What are some modern interrogation techniques that can be used to break down a suspect, in order to get them to snap if they are guilty of a crime, or if they simply have relevant information that they may not be willing to share? I think of an interrogation as a vice, it's intended to squeeze information out of an informant.

On a related note, I recently watched a video in which a police officer tased Patrick Mumford. Mr. Mumford was being questioned by the police, who thought that he bore a resemblance to someone for whom there was a warrant to be served. In the video you can clearly see that the officer at no point asked Mr. Mumford his name, though they claimed they asked three times when confronted by a neighbor, and then increased that claim to four times.


I think there needs to be balance between the Left (mercy) and the Right (severity) when it comes to the government/police.
 

radcen

Phonetic Mnemonic ©
DP Veteran
Joined
Sep 3, 2011
Messages
34,817
Reaction score
18,574
Location
Look to your right... I'm that guy.
Gender
Undisclosed
Political Leaning
Centrist
When the suspect hears, "You have the right to remain silent..." why doesn't he? Who wants to be browbeaten and told over and over how guilty he is? Just say, "I want a lawyer," and the interrogation is over.

And yet. people confess to crimes that they haven't committed. Amazing
Usually. Not always.

Suspect should still say that, though. It *may* give them some leverage later if it can be shown that the interrogation did not stop.
 

Dittohead not!

master political analyst
DP Veteran
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
51,847
Reaction score
33,760
Location
The Golden State
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Usually. Not always.

Suspect should still say that, though. It *may* give them some leverage later if it can be shown that the interrogation did not stop.

The suspect can also say, "I'm exercising my right to remain silent" or simply say nothing.
 

Casper

Banned
DP Veteran
Joined
Dec 14, 2015
Messages
26,734
Reaction score
11,514
Location
Elsewhere
Gender
Undisclosed
Political Leaning
Independent
How Police Interrogation Works | HowStuffWorks

Ever since beating and deprivation of food were outlawed as an interrogation strategy, we've been searching for new ways to oppress people who are in the custody of law enforcement. Taking a law abiding citizen into custody isn't illegal; suspects need not be guilty of a crime to undergo interrogation. What are some modern interrogation techniques that can be used to break down a suspect, in order to get them to snap if they are guilty of a crime, or if they simply have relevant information that they may not be willing to share? I think of an interrogation as a vice, it's intended to squeeze information out of an informant.

On a related note, I recently watched a video in which a police officer tased Patrick Mumford. Mr. Mumford was being questioned by the police, who thought that he bore a resemblance to someone for whom there was a warrant to be served. In the video you can clearly see that the officer at no point asked Mr. Mumford his name, though they claimed they asked three times when confronted by a neighbor, and then increased that claim to four times.


Pointless, all any person has to do is say that they are invoking their right not to talk and demand to see a lawyer, all discussion ends there or the cops are in trouble. Never speak to LEO's if you feel that they may be in the least bit looking at you as a suspect, it is not in your best interests.
 

Dittohead not!

master political analyst
DP Veteran
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
51,847
Reaction score
33,760
Location
The Golden State
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
They can... even before officially detained and read their rights... and they should, more often.

Maybe the problem is what BrewerBob pointed out: That half of the population with IQ below 100.

Like this guy:

 
Top Bottom