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OxyContin Maker Explored Expansion Into “Attractive” Anti-Addiction Market

Rogue Valley

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OxyContin Maker Explored Expansion Into “Attractive” Anti-Addiction Market

1462636852800


1/30/19
Not content with billions of dollars in profits from the potent painkiller OxyContin, its maker explored expanding into an “attractive market” fueled by the drug’s popularity — treatment of opioid addiction, according to previously secret passages in a court document filed by the state of Massachusetts. In internal correspondence beginning in 2014, Purdue Pharma executives discussed how the sale of opioids and the treatment of opioid addiction are “naturally linked” and that the company should expand across “the pain and addiction spectrum,” according to redacted sections of the lawsuit by the Massachusetts attorney general. A member of the billionaire Sackler family, which founded and controls the privately held company, joined in those discussions and urged staff in an email to give “immediate attention” to this business opportunity, the complaint alleges. ProPublica reviewed the scores of redacted paragraphs in Massachusetts’ 274-page civil complaint against Purdue, eight Sackler family members, company directors and current and former executives, which alleges that they created the opioid epidemic through illegal deceit. These passages remain blacked out at the company’s request after the rest of the complaint was made public on Jan. 15. A Massachusetts Superior Court judge on Monday ordered that the entire document be released, but the judge gave Purdue until Friday to seek a further stay of the ruling.

The sections of the complaint already made public contend that the Sacklers pushed for higher doses of OxyContin, guided efforts to mislead doctors and the public about the drug’s addictive capacity, and blamed misuse on patients. Citing extensive emails and internal company documents, the redacted sections allege that Purdue and the Sackler family went to extreme lengths to boost OxyContin sales and burnish the drug’s reputation in the face of increased regulation and growing public awareness of its addictive nature. Concerns about doctors improperly prescribing the drug, and patients becoming addicted, were swept aside in an aggressive effort to drive OxyContin sales ever higher, the complaint alleges. Among the allegations: Purdue paid two executives convicted of fraudulently marketing OxyContin millions of dollars to assure their loyalty, concealed information about doctors suspected of inappropriately prescribing the opioid, and was advised by global consulting firm McKinsey & Co. on strategies to boost the drug’s sales and burnish its image, including how to “counter the emotional messages” of mothers whose children overdosed. Since 2007, the Sackler family has received more than $4 billion in payouts from Purdue, according to a redacted paragraph in the complaint. The Massachusetts complaint cites multiple incidents of Purdue allegedly sitting on information, sometimes for years, about doctors it had reason to believe were inappropriately prescribing OxyContin. In 2012, a Purdue employee appealed to the company’s head of sales to alert health insurers to data the company collected about doctors suspected of abusing or illegally prescribing OxyContin. The list of doctors was code-named Project Zero.

The Sakler family, owners of Purdue Pharmaceuticals, intentionally ruined the lives of countless people to amass their billionaire fortunes.

In a display of unparalleled greed, the Sakler's also wanted to control the opioid addiction treatment market.
 

bongsaway

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OxyContin Maker Explored Expansion Into “Attractive” Anti-Addiction Market

1462636852800




The Sakler family, owners of Purdue Pharmaceuticals, intentionally ruined the lives of countless people to amass their billionaire fortunes.

In a display of unparalleled greed, the Sakler's also wanted to control the opioid addiction treatment market.

So one of my clients is a mental health nonprofit center. The drug makers come into the crappiest companies (mine) and give the staff free lunches whenever they deliver their new drug supplies. It's kind of demoralizing that these places are just drug pushers.
 

Rosie1

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They are truly scum, and have no scruples whatsoever. Manufacture the drug, then explore investing in what would essenctually be blood money for them.

Meanwhile, genuine people who work in the treatment of addiction are heroes. They help others. I have heard them say, they would be glad to leave their field, when everyone has recovered enough to no longer need help.
 

Thoreau72

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It is amazing how many lives have been destroyed by Oxy. Pure greed and a lack of ethics.

Yes indeed, a fine demonstration by the Sacklers of the absence of corporate conscience. I hope the pending lawsuit renders them penniless.
 
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