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My brother took a DNA test and the results are not what we suspected.

Moderate71

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My brother, along with some of his co-workers, took a DNA test and the results were really surprising. I think it's because people moved around all over the place. The results said we are 28% Irish. None of us saw this coming. The only thing I can think is that my dad's mom said she was Irish, except we all simply thought she didn't know what she was talking about because her maiden name was Wilson. Another surprise was significant amounts of French and German. None of our ancestors were thought to have come from either of those countries. Then again, like I said, people moved around a lot. All of my grandparents were born to first generation immigrants. Norwegian X Dutch on my mom's side and Luxemburg (a small country by Czechoslovakia) on my dad's side is what we thought. However, it appears my dad was half Irish and his family wandered outside of Luxemburg a lot.

Anyone else ever take a DNA test and have the results be really surprising?
 

Rexedgar

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Luxembourg, from there gotta spell there.

:2wave:
 

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My brother, along with some of his co-workers, took a DNA test and the results were really surprising. I think it's because people moved around all over the place. The results said we are 28% Irish. None of us saw this coming. The only thing I can think is that my dad's mom said she was Irish, except we all simply thought she didn't know what she was talking about because her maiden name was Wilson. Another surprise was significant amounts of French and German. None of our ancestors were thought to have come from either of those countries. Then again, like I said, people moved around a lot. All of my grandparents were born to first generation immigrants. Norwegian X Dutch on my mom's side and Luxemburg (a small country by Czechoslovakia) on my dad's side is what we thought. However, it appears my dad was half Irish and his family wandered outside of Luxemburg a lot.

Anyone else ever take a DNA test and have the results be really surprising?

Given that Wilson is not uncommon as a last name in Ireland, and that Luxembourg is actually between Belgium, France and Germany and nowhere near Czechoslovakia (which doesn’t exist anymore anyway), I think the surprise here is that you would have all done better buying a World Atlas before bothering with a DNA test...
 

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My brother, along with some of his co-workers, took a DNA test and the results were really surprising. I think it's because people moved around all over the place. The results said we are 28% Irish. None of us saw this coming. The only thing I can think is that my dad's mom said she was Irish, except we all simply thought she didn't know what she was talking about because her maiden name was Wilson. Another surprise was significant amounts of French and German. None of our ancestors were thought to have come from either of those countries. Then again, like I said, people moved around a lot. All of my grandparents were born to first generation immigrants. Norwegian X Dutch on my mom's side and Luxemburg (a small country by Czechoslovakia) on my dad's side is what we thought. However, it appears my dad was half Irish and his family wandered outside of Luxemburg a lot.

Anyone else ever take a DNA test and have the results be really surprising?

I have not taken a DNA test but sure have spent a lot of time researching my family tree.

You know during the 16th and 17th centuries there was a lot of persecution of those who accepted Protestantism throughout Europe. From what I have read Southern Ireland was a blood bath for Protestants and many fled. Folks fled persecution from all over Europe to the Netherlands region where religious tolerance was practiced. That could be why you have so much Irish and still have family from a town around Luxembourg.
 

Moderate71

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Given that Wilson is not uncommon as a last name in Ireland, and that Luxembourg is actually between Belgium, France and Germany and nowhere near Czechoslovakia (which doesn’t exist anymore anyway), I think the surprise here is that you would have all done better buying a World Atlas before bothering with a DNA test...

I thought Irish people always had an O or a Mc in front of their last name. Simply because Luxemburg is in the same vicinity as France and Germany doesn't mean that French or German ancestry or culture would be common there. My Grandfather spoke a separate language called Letzeburgish. It is a completely different language that has absolutely nothing to do with either French or German. Here is a link. I can't read it, except it is a totally separate language from what I understand.

Luxemburgisch lernen - Luxemburg
 

Threegoofs

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I thought Irish people always had an O or a Mc in front of their last name. Simply because Luxemburg is in the same vicinity as France and Germany doesn't mean that French or German ancestry or culture would be common there. My Grandfather spoke a separate language called Letzeburgish. It is a completely different language that has absolutely nothing to do with either French or German. Here is a link. I can't read it, except it is a totally separate language from what I understand.

Luxemburgisch lernen - Luxemburg

Luxembourg WAS France. And Germany. And Belgium.

Your genes didn’t come from defined political boundaries, dude.
 

Moderate71

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Luxembourg WAS France. And Germany. And Belgium.

Your genes didn’t come from defined political boundaries, dude.

That is my point. Simply because they were in the vague overall vicinity of France and Germany doesn't not does not imply a genetic relationship. Also, how do you explain their linguistics independence? I looked at it and the title is Luxembourgish lernen. Lernen means learning in their language, which suggests it is actually closer related to English. Look at their numbers. They are like English numbers.

one – eent
two – zwee
three – dräi
four – véier
five – fënnef
six – sechs
seven – siwen
eight – aacht
nine – néng
ten – zéng
 

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That is my point. Simply because they were in the vague overall vicinity of France and Germany doesn't not does not imply a genetic relationship. Also, how do you explain their linguistics independence? I looked at it and the title is Luxembourgish lernen. Lernen means learning in their language, which suggests it is actually closer related to English. Look at their numbers. They are like English numbers.

one – eent
two – zwee
three – dräi
four – véier
five – fënnef
six – sechs
seven – siwen
eight – aacht
nine – néng
ten – zéng

Ok. You’re just trolling now.
 

beerftw

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My brother, along with some of his co-workers, took a DNA test and the results were really surprising. I think it's because people moved around all over the place. The results said we are 28% Irish. None of us saw this coming. The only thing I can think is that my dad's mom said she was Irish, except we all simply thought she didn't know what she was talking about because her maiden name was Wilson. Another surprise was significant amounts of French and German. None of our ancestors were thought to have come from either of those countries. Then again, like I said, people moved around a lot. All of my grandparents were born to first generation immigrants. Norwegian X Dutch on my mom's side and Luxemburg (a small country by Czechoslovakia) on my dad's side is what we thought. However, it appears my dad was half Irish and his family wandered outside of Luxemburg a lot.

Anyone else ever take a DNA test and have the results be really surprising?

Europeans were all over the place, my family heritage goes back to british peasantry, french royalty, irish, germans, cherokee, and many others not mentioned.
 

maquiscat

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Be careful on some of these tests. I know someone who did two different companies and got two different results.

Sent from my Z982 using Tapatalk
 

Helix

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My brother, along with some of his co-workers, took a DNA test and the results were really surprising. I think it's because people moved around all over the place. The results said we are 28% Irish. None of us saw this coming. The only thing I can think is that my dad's mom said she was Irish, except we all simply thought she didn't know what she was talking about because her maiden name was Wilson. Another surprise was significant amounts of French and German. None of our ancestors were thought to have come from either of those countries. Then again, like I said, people moved around a lot. All of my grandparents were born to first generation immigrants. Norwegian X Dutch on my mom's side and Luxemburg (a small country by Czechoslovakia) on my dad's side is what we thought. However, it appears my dad was half Irish and his family wandered outside of Luxemburg a lot.

Anyone else ever take a DNA test and have the results be really surprising?

finding out about your heritage is so cool. i'm getting ready to spit in a tube and send it off, as well. my folks and my wife have already done so. i'm looking forward to checking my results out, even though i already have a pretty good idea of what the results might be.
 

Josie

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My brother, along with some of his co-workers, took a DNA test and the results were really surprising. I think it's because people moved around all over the place. The results said we are 28% Irish. None of us saw this coming. The only thing I can think is that my dad's mom said she was Irish, except we all simply thought she didn't know what she was talking about because her maiden name was Wilson. Another surprise was significant amounts of French and German. None of our ancestors were thought to have come from either of those countries. Then again, like I said, people moved around a lot. All of my grandparents were born to first generation immigrants. Norwegian X Dutch on my mom's side and Luxemburg (a small country by Czechoslovakia) on my dad's side is what we thought. However, it appears my dad was half Irish and his family wandered outside of Luxemburg a lot.

Anyone else ever take a DNA test and have the results be really surprising?

A friend of mine found and finally met her biological dad because of her DNA results.
 

RAMOSS

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finding out about your heritage is so cool. i'm getting ready to spit in a tube and send it off, as well. my folks and my wife have already done so. i'm looking forward to checking my results out, even though i already have a pretty good idea of what the results might be.

A woman and her siblings took the test, and she found out that her father was not the father of the other siblings. Shocking, huh? Turns out her real father was a guy her mother worked for. She started up a Facebook group with someone else in a similar situation, just as a 'support group', and the group grew to be over 3000 people pretty quickly. I guess it's more common than people realize.
 

Helix

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A woman and her siblings took the test, and she found out that her father was not the father of the other siblings. Shocking, huh? Turns out her real father was a guy her mother worked for. She started up a Facebook group with someone else in a similar situation, just as a 'support group', and the group grew to be over 3000 people pretty quickly. I guess it's more common than people realize.

it's not surprising. a lot of people cheat and then don't admit it.
 

RAMOSS

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it's not surprising. a lot of people cheat and then don't admit it.

And, I suspect, a lot of people cheat, and don't realize on WHO their child's father actually is. There are also cases where people find that they, or a parent got swtiched at birth with someone else.
 

Helix

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And, I suspect, a lot of people cheat, and don't realize on WHO their child's father actually is. There are also cases where people find that they, or a parent got swtiched at birth with someone else.

yeah, that happens as well, though probably not as often anymore. a hospital doing a baby switcharoo now would probably get the **** sued out of it. either way, genealogy is pretty interesting. Mom and Dad definitely found out some things about the migration patterns of our ancestors that they didn't know.
 

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That is my point. Simply because they were in the vague overall vicinity of France and Germany doesn't not does not imply a genetic relationship. Also, how do you explain their linguistics independence? I looked at it and the title is Luxembourgish lernen. Lernen means learning in their language, which suggests it is actually closer related to English. Look at their numbers. They are like English numbers.

one – eent
two – zwee
three – dräi
four – véier
five – fënnef
six – sechs
seven – siwen
eight – aacht
nine – néng
ten – zéng

Luxembourgish is a West German language. Luxembourgers are a German people.
 

Eriech

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A woman and her siblings took the test, and she found out that her father was not the father of the other siblings. Shocking, huh? Turns out her real father was a guy her mother worked for. She started up a Facebook group with someone else in a similar situation, just as a 'support group', and the group grew to be over 3000 people pretty quickly. I guess it's more common than people realize.
Earlier this summer my wife's niece found a 1/2 brother that she didn't know about and was a surprise to rest of family too. They had both done the DNA thing. My brother in law apparently had concurrent relationships while in the service. Married one, the other put a child up for adoption that he says he never new about. We flew the 1/2 brother now 35 up to meet the family......amazing surreal week. Spitting image of his dad.....no doubt. Happy kid raised by nice family.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

RAMOSS

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Earlier this summer my wife's niece found a 1/2 brother that she didn't know about and was a surprise to rest of family too. They had both done the DNA thing. My brother in law apparently had concurrent relationships while in the service. Married one, the other put a child up for adoption that he says he never new about. We flew the 1/2 brother now 35 up to meet the family......amazing surreal week. Spitting image of his dad.....no doubt. Happy kid raised by nice family.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

I hope that didn't put pressure on the family. I have heard of cases that was found out, and it caused divorces. I also saw another case when the wife's attitude was 'We were going through difficult times at that point, and we overcame it', and welcomed her husbands son into the family, because no matter what, it was NOT his fault.

There is also the folk song where this woman was trying to find a husband, and her father kept on saying "No, you can't marry him, he's my son'. She complains to her mother, and her mother says "Marry who you want, he's not your father'.
 

spud_meister

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https://now.tufts.edu/articles/pulling-back-curtain-dna-ancestry-tests
They compare SNPs with those most frequently associated with different populations in their reference database. The results are in no way definitive; instead each company uses common genetic variations as the basis for saying the probability is that 50 percent of your DNA is, for example, from North Europe and 30 percent is from Asia, based on how it compares to the information in its database....
Your DNA contains millions of SNPs, but these tests are selectively looking at certain genetic variations and use between 100 to 300 AIMs, which account for a small part of the SNPs that differentiate the human family. So even if a test says you are 50 percent European, really it can only report that half of those SNPs of your DNA looks to be European
 

Risky Thicket

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Yes, and also much depends on generational results. Five generations past may produce different results than 10 generations, etc.

Georgia like Australia was established as a British penal colony. You aren't/weren't surprised to discover that a whopping number of suffering bastards thrown on coffin ships and sent to Australia were Irish.

People who remained in Georgia or South Carolina or Australia reproduced with others that likely had strong Irish heritage. That has changed over time. However, we'd obviously find a higher preponderance of Celtic/Irish DNA among Australians or Georgians. I'd venture to say as time passes the percentage of Irish DNA has lessened among Georgians and Australians.

All that aside, go to Ireland and tell people in a pub that you are Irish, your DNA says so. LOL! The Irish know the difference and they will have no problem explaining it. On the other hand I'd put money on Australians drinking Irish under the table.
 

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I hope that didn't put pressure on the family. I have heard of cases that was found out, and it caused divorces. I also saw another case when the wife's attitude was 'We were going through difficult times at that point, and we overcame it', and welcomed her husbands son into the family, because no matter what, it was NOT his fault.

There is also the folk song where this woman was trying to find a husband, and her father kept on saying "No, you can't marry him, he's my son'. She complains to her mother, and her mother says "Marry who you want, he's not your father'.
All is good.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

Lord Tammerlain

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Yes, and also much depends on generational results. Five generations past may produce different results than 10 generations, etc.

Georgia like Australia was established as a British penal colony. You aren't/weren't surprised to discover that a whopping number of suffering bastards thrown on coffin ships and sent to Australia were Irish.

People who remained in Georgia or South Carolina or Australia reproduced with others that likely had strong Irish heritage. That has changed over time. However, we'd obviously find a higher preponderance of Celtic/Irish DNA among Australians or Georgians. I'd venture to say as time passes the percentage of Irish DNA has lessened among Georgians and Australians.

All that aside, go to Ireland and tell people in a pub that you are Irish, your DNA says so. LOL! The Irish know the difference and they will have no problem explaining it. On the other hand I'd put money on Australians drinking Irish under the table.

In Australia, I expect the Irish DNA has been slowly replaced with that of Ovis Aries
 
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